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Octane

TRAVEL
June 9, 1996
Regarding the suggestion that it can be helpful to use higher-octane fuel at higher altitude ("Before Taking a Motor Trip, Check Your Cash Efficiency," Travel Insider, May 19): This makes no sense. Gasoline burns slower at higher altitude because of less oxygen, which effectively boosts octane. You will find that the octane ratings on all grades of gasoline sold in high altitude areas of the country are lower. RAY ELIAS Los Angeles Christopher Reynolds replies: Mr. Elias is right about lower octane levels being necessary at higher altitudes.
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NEWS
August 4, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At first glance, the tiny red-and-white gas station looks like a movie set for a period film about small-town America. There are just three pumps, with a small, hand-painted "full-service" sign propped atop the middle one. Not one electronic-payment machine is in sight. And attendants, with aim-to-please faces, actually speak to and dote on drivers who pull into the station: wiping their car windows clean, looking under the hood and sending them off with "Thanks . . . Have a good one."
SPORTS
February 24, 1994 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe it was playoff jitters. Or perhaps it was good defense. But whatever the reason, it was not a game worth remembering for the Ventura College women's basketball team. Sure, the Pirates defeated Citrus, 50-34, as expected in a first-round game of the Southern California regional Wednesday night at Ventura, but they had to fight for every shot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1993 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oil giant Atlantic Richfield Co. has been charged by the Los Angeles city attorney with selling its highly touted EC-1 gasoline at lower than the advertised octane level. The city attorney's office has filed 15 counts of false and misleading advertising against the company, which markets its Arco products at about 700 stations in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High Octane Productions, the entertainment company in Laguna Beach that recently grabbed the rights to "A Child's Christmas in Wales" away from GroveShakespeare, has landed a Dec. 6-13 engagement for its production at the 450-seat Norris Theatre in Rolling Hills Estates. Meanwhile, the former managing director of the Grove, Barbara G. Hammerman, has turned down an invitation from High Octane president Bradford C. Moseley to co-produce the show. "We've inked the Norris," Moseley said.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Take one pair of wide-leg pants (use bell bottoms if elephant legs aren't available.) Add one dress, cut from your mother's table linens. With leftovers from last spring, form a two-layer look--two skirts or a skirt over pants. Use a sheer fabric, preferably black. Season to taste with macrame cuffs, crocheted collars, rickrack suede sashes, halter tops, or thick maxi-heel shoes, and serve with a Paris label. That's the French formula for a new spring wardrobe.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. oil companies dupe American motorists out of $3 billion annually by falsely suggesting that high-octane fuels improve performance and help maintain engine efficiency in the overwhelming majority of vehicles, a consumer research group charged Wednesday. Furthermore, the group said, companies frequently mislabel gasoline, indicating higher octane levels than the fuel actually contains.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
Many motorists believe that higher-octane gasoline, typically a premium-grade fuel, will yield higher performance and better economy. Gasoline retailers often encourage this notion, either explicitly or through subtle advertising that extols the benefit of their higher-priced brands. You might think that with computer-controlled engines, this hype would have passed from the scene along with carburetors and leaded gasoline.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The revival of Paul Zindel's "And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little" at the Zephyr Theatre is a boisterous tour de force. A dramatic comedy about three neurotic sisters, the show capitalizes on some serendipitous connections with the 1971 Broadway production. The director at the Zephyr, Rae Allen, won a Tony as an actor in that New York show and one of her actors, Paul Lieber, was also in it with her. These personal associations appear to have rubbed off on this crisp and sure-footed revival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1990 | GEORGE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One small Santa Fe Springs oil refinery said it would have to close and another said its existence would be threatened if air quality officials enact a proposed ban on the bulk use of hydrofluoric acid at their plants. The South Coast Air Quality Management District says the ban is needed to prevent a potential catastrophe that could threaten the lives of thousands living near four Southland refineries and a refrigerant manufacturing plant that use the acutely hazardous substance.
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