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October Surprise

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991
Although the story has been available for years, it's good that the "October Surprise" is finally making it into the mainstream media via "Frontline" and Stuart Eizenstat's column ("The Presidency, by Any Means," Commentary, May 5). It should come as no surprise that events such as the Chennault episode (1968), Watergate (1972) and the October surprise (1980) keep being perpetrated by Republicans. The reason the Republican Party exists is to exert the maximum degree of control over the maximum number of citizens for the maximum monetary benefit of the party's benefactors, the corporate and business minority of the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 4, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio - Gabrielle Smith is that rarest of rarities, coveted by both sides in the presidential campaign: an undecided voter in the bull's-eye state of Ohio. As a teacher, she doesn't like Mitt Romney's support for charter schools. But she also thinks President Obama has spent too much money, and she worries about the size of the federal debt. The 28-year-old Democrat plans to make her choice in the voting booth and says there isn't much at this point either candidate can do to sway her - she already mutes their TV ads - and that includes their responses to the devastation caused by super storm Sandy.
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OPINION
October 30, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
If you want to understand why conservatives have lost faith in the so-called mainstream media, you need to ponder the question: Where is the Benghazi feeding frenzy? Unlike some of my colleagues on the right, I don't think there's a conspiracy at work. Rather, I think journalists tend to act on their instincts (some even brag about this; you could look it up). And, collectively, the mainstream media's instincts run liberal, making groupthink inevitable. In 2000, a Democratic operative orchestrated an "October surprise" attack on George W. Bush, revealing that 24 years earlier, he'd been arrested for drunk driving.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Civil libertarians are upbeat after an argument in the Supreme Court this week over whether lawyers, activists and academics can challenge the constitutionality of a law authorizing the wiretapping of potential terrorists abroad -- who may be conversing or swapping emails with Americans. The plaintiffs, who carry on confidential conversations with foreign clients and sources, say the law chills them in the exercise of their rights. As is often the case, the civil liberties groups are pinning their hopes on Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who has voted with liberals on the court in previous cases arising from the war on terrorism.  Kennedy seemed receptive to the plaintiffs' argument that they have standing to sue because they fear that their confidential conversations with sources and clients are being monitored.   “I think the lawyer would engage in malpractice if he talked on the telephone with some of these clients, given this statute,” Kennedy told Solicitor General Donald Verrilli.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1991
The real surprise will come if the White House allows the investigation to go on at a later date. ARNO TANNEY Santa Monica
SPORTS
October 2, 2008 | Bill Plaschke
CHICAGO -- October arrived Wednesday on the back of a chilly lake wind and a nasty neighborhood roar. The Dodgers shrugged. October arrived with the doom of a two-run deficit in four miserable innings. The Dodgers grinned. October arrived high, hard, and screaming down at them with the bad luck that has plagued their postseasons for the last 20 years. The Dodgers turned on it. Finally, they turned on it. James Loney hit it 400 feet into a Wrigley Field mob gone silent.
OPINION
October 30, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
If you want to understand why conservatives have lost faith in the so-called mainstream media, you need to ponder the question: Where is the Benghazi feeding frenzy? Unlike some of my colleagues on the right, I don't think there's a conspiracy at work. Rather, I think journalists tend to act on their instincts (some even brag about this; you could look it up). And, collectively, the mainstream media's instincts run liberal, making groupthink inevitable. In 2000, a Democratic operative orchestrated an "October surprise" attack on George W. Bush, revealing that 24 years earlier, he'd been arrested for drunk driving.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Donald Trump's Wednesday presidential race "game changer" turned out to be anything but. The "Celebrity Apprentice" host promised he had information that would have a dramatic effect on the race for the White House between President Obama and Mitt Romney, but the short two-minute video released on YouTube turned out to be a bizarre offer from Trump to donate $5 million to Obama's favorite charity if the president released his college records and...
NATIONAL
November 14, 2008 | Associated Press
The federal government began the new budget year with a record deficit of $237.2 billion, reflecting the billions of dollars the government has started to pay out to rescue the financial system. The Treasury Department said Thursday that the deficit for the first month in the 2009 budget year was the highest monthly imbalance on record. It was far bigger than analysts had expected, more than four times larger than the October 2007 deficit of $56.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The first big snowstorm of the season closed sections of major highways and blacked out more than 100,000 utility customers. The National Weather Service posted a winter storm warning for parts of New York and issued winter storm advisories for parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Vermont. "It looked like a mini-blizzard in October," said Joe Orlando, spokesman for the New Jersey Turnpike Authority. "We're salting the roads and we haven't even gone trick-or-treating yet." Up to a foot of snow was possible in parts of upstate New York, and as much as 9 inches was forecast in Vermont's mountains, the weather service said.
SPORTS
October 2, 2008 | Bill Plaschke
CHICAGO -- October arrived Wednesday on the back of a chilly lake wind and a nasty neighborhood roar. The Dodgers shrugged. October arrived with the doom of a two-run deficit in four miserable innings. The Dodgers grinned. October arrived high, hard, and screaming down at them with the bad luck that has plagued their postseasons for the last 20 years. The Dodgers turned on it. Finally, they turned on it. James Loney hit it 400 feet into a Wrigley Field mob gone silent.
NEWS
September 13, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Friday, The Times' Greg Miller and Julian E. Barnes reported that the United States has escalated its war against Al Qaeda and its Taliban allies by "deploying Predator aircraft equipped with sophisticated new surveillance systems that were instrumental in crippling the insurgency in Iraq." It's a story whose significance may extend well beyond the benighted hills and valleys of Pakistan's violent Pashtun hinterlands and onto the hustings of our current presidential campaign. Coupled with Thursday's report in the New York Times that President Bush has signed a secret order permitting Afghanistan-based U.S. special operations forces to cross into Pakistan without Islamabad's permission, the odds of an "October surprise" that could influence the general election have risen appreciably.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2008 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Air travelers suffering from summer sticker shock might find some relief this fall. With demand for air travel falling faster than Olympic swimming records, some carriers are slashing autumn fares to levels not seen since oil prices began skyrocketing last year. "It's a good time to fly if you want to put up with the grief," said Joe Brancatelli, editor of the business travel website JoeSentMe.com.
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