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Octogenarians

NEWS
June 12, 1994 | LINDA FELDMAN
Her eyes have a childlike quality. They're curious, seeking. But the eyes don't jibe with the tremor in her hand. She readily admits that her memory sometimes disappoints her. Her physical presence is slight but when she claps her hands after making a discovery about her beloved eucalyptus trees, it's clear there's a force to be reckoned with here. "Sometimes I think I lead a charmed life; it always gives me what I need," says Grace Heintz, 89, from her modest apartment in Santa Monica.
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NEWS
November 30, 1986 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
In the context of nuclear weapons, war is a misnomer--an impossibility. With two superpowers having the capability of destroying every human on the face of the earth a dozen times over, the word "war," said philosopher John Somerville, is an inappropriate--even violent--use of language. "The word war is inaccurate and misleading," he said, "for the simple reason that what we've always called war is survivable by most of the human race."
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dominican voters crowded the polls Wednesday in a peaceful election to choose one of two octogenarians to lead this economically hard-pressed country for the next four years. The presidential race appeared to be a toss-up between the incumbent conservative President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, and leftist former President Juan Bosch, 80, facing one another at the polls for the fifth time in the last quarter century.
SPORTS
April 13, 1991 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's clear up a misconception. Despite the rantings of the zealous exercise and nutrition folks, life does not begin at 80 or 85. If you asked the average 85-year-old person on a Wednesday what he hopes will begin, the most common answer would be Thursday. So just what were 81-year-olds Bert Burnham of Van Nuys and Bill Conel of Oceanside doing running back and forth across a tennis court like wild dogs on a hot and sunny day in Studio City earlier this week? Relax.
TRAVEL
March 28, 1999 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
"Perhaps you would like to know how two women in their 80s who love Paris and touring by car cope." This is the way a recent letter to the Travel section--signed simply "Dolly and Maisie of Santa Barbara"--began. And, indeed, I wanted to know how two octogenarians manage to gad about Europe on their own, braving traffic on French autoroutes and never coming undone when they encounter road signs that say Allumez Vos Feux and Cedez le Passage.
NEWS
June 24, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
Things were pretty quiet around the Mother Gertrude Balcazar Home for Senior Citizens on Monday--until the Golden Dreams showed up. With verve and vitality, the octogenarian troupe, led by music teacher Violeta Quintero, entertained their peers with Mexican folk-style songs they composed about the trials and triumphs of living.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2004 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
In Patrice LeConte's enigmatic "Intimate Strangers," a woman named Anna knocks on the wrong door of a professional building in Paris, leading to a quirkily suspenseful psychological pas de deux. The misunderstanding between Anna (Sandrine Bonnaire) and William (Fabrice Luchini), the man who opens the door, builds to a craftily comic level, with the truth becoming increasingly elusive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1992 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leah Witherspoon is 8 years old, a believer in heaven, who used to ask God every night to give her daddy and her grandpa a hug and a kiss for her. Then she'd pray for a substitute grandpa. Arthur Weller is 86, a widower who still keeps his wife's brushes laid out on the dresser. Despite his popularity with the widows at the retirement home, he still has a little trouble filling the hours in between meals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001 | STEVE HARVEY
It took George Matsui of L.A. an hour to complete the Ketchum YMCA Stair Climb to the Top last year. Of course, he did have to run up 75 flights of stairs. At the age of 85. With two artificial knees. "I rested every two or three floors," Matsui recalled. "There are 20 steps between floors, so I went up about 1,500 steps." The secret for his endurance? "I'm an outdoors person," he said simply. Alas, he has dropped out of this year's stair climb, set for Oct. 6 at the downtown library tower.
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