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Octogenarians

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1989 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Barmaid Carrie Felix uses an old bouncer's technique when she has to kick someone out of the El Sereno lounge where she works. That's because Felix is an old bouncer. "I just ask them real nice to leave," says Felix, 80. "Usually they do. Being older gives me more respect." Felix has served up drinks and banter for 17 years at the Stop Off, a bar at the edge of a working-class neighborhood.
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NEWS
May 20, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In this era of ethical sensitivity, most U.S. senators try to minimize the gifts they must disclose on their annual financial reports. For example, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) reported only the receipt of a paperweight and a crystal eagle. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski (D-Md.) noted that she received a vase, a sugar bowl and creamer, and "a dozen roses" from the Polish Women's National Alliance. For Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-S.C.), however, receiving gifts apparently involves no political anxiety.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the past 12 years, for better or for worse, the Lopez Adobe, a crumbling, historic building owned by the city of San Fernando, and Albert Weinmann, an ailing and aged carpenter, have been joined in a kind of common-law marriage. Weinmann never had a contract with the city, never paid rent and never received a salary. But he lived in the two-story, Victorian-style adobe nonetheless, tending to the general maintenance needs of the 115-year-old building and acting as a round-the-clock watchman.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | HAROLD P. LEVY
If you've ever dreamed of living to a really ripe old age--say 100 or 115 or longer--your chances of making it improve every day. For my part, it was only after turning 80 last year and starting to ponder about my future that I became aware how the outlook on aging has changed, how numerous experts in the field of aging no longer consider 80 the mark of old age it once was thought to be. Rather, they now see the normal life span for Americans extending beyond 100 years.
NEWS
November 30, 1986 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
In the context of nuclear weapons, war is a misnomer--an impossibility. With two superpowers having the capability of destroying every human on the face of the earth a dozen times over, the word "war," said philosopher John Somerville, is an inappropriate--even violent--use of language. "The word war is inaccurate and misleading," he said, "for the simple reason that what we've always called war is survivable by most of the human race."
NEWS
June 12, 1994 | LINDA FELDMAN
Her eyes have a childlike quality. They're curious, seeking. But the eyes don't jibe with the tremor in her hand. She readily admits that her memory sometimes disappoints her. Her physical presence is slight but when she claps her hands after making a discovery about her beloved eucalyptus trees, it's clear there's a force to be reckoned with here. "Sometimes I think I lead a charmed life; it always gives me what I need," says Grace Heintz, 89, from her modest apartment in Santa Monica.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dominican voters crowded the polls Wednesday in a peaceful election to choose one of two octogenarians to lead this economically hard-pressed country for the next four years. The presidential race appeared to be a toss-up between the incumbent conservative President Joaquin Balaguer, 83, and leftist former President Juan Bosch, 80, facing one another at the polls for the fifth time in the last quarter century.
SPORTS
April 13, 1991 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let's clear up a misconception. Despite the rantings of the zealous exercise and nutrition folks, life does not begin at 80 or 85. If you asked the average 85-year-old person on a Wednesday what he hopes will begin, the most common answer would be Thursday. So just what were 81-year-olds Bert Burnham of Van Nuys and Bill Conel of Oceanside doing running back and forth across a tennis court like wild dogs on a hot and sunny day in Studio City earlier this week? Relax.
TRAVEL
March 28, 1999 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
"Perhaps you would like to know how two women in their 80s who love Paris and touring by car cope." This is the way a recent letter to the Travel section--signed simply "Dolly and Maisie of Santa Barbara"--began. And, indeed, I wanted to know how two octogenarians manage to gad about Europe on their own, braving traffic on French autoroutes and never coming undone when they encounter road signs that say Allumez Vos Feux and Cedez le Passage.
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