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Octogenarians

NEWS
September 19, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sipping tea out of a Che Guevara mug, tending her suburban garden and admitting to having spied for the Soviet Union for nearly four decades, 87-year-old Melita Norwood has enraged and baffled Britain while calmly waiting to see if she will be prosecuted for treachery. The great-grandmother, who passed nuclear weapon secrets to Moscow, has been depicted as England's equivalent of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, the Americans who were convicted of trying to pass U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Keeping up with David Kaye can be challenging. The slightly built community activist walks fast, thinks faster and generally doesn't sit still long enough for any grass to grow under his feet. On Tuesday, the octogenarian was up at dawn as usual, exercised, then headed over to a Chatsworth food warehouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1999 | STEPHEN F. HOLDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There are a few things you ought to know about Doris Haddock before taking a walk with the 89-year-old woman. No. 1: Despite her age, severe arthritis and her recent recovery from emphysema, she keeps a brisk pace. No. 2: She waits for no one. And No. 3: She walks with a purpose. The soft-spoken, 5-foot "Granny D" is nearly halfway through a 3,055-mile walk across the country to call attention to campaign finance reform.
TRAVEL
March 28, 1999 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
"Perhaps you would like to know how two women in their 80s who love Paris and touring by car cope." This is the way a recent letter to the Travel section--signed simply "Dolly and Maisie of Santa Barbara"--began. And, indeed, I wanted to know how two octogenarians manage to gad about Europe on their own, braving traffic on French autoroutes and never coming undone when they encounter road signs that say Allumez Vos Feux and Cedez le Passage.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | By ERNEST F. IMHOFF, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Bradford Washburn has a favorite phrase: "Skin one skunk at a time." The critters out there know better. At 88, Washburn still walks, shoots and maps mountains, and he directs projects simultaneously as the mountaineer, photographer, cartographer and manager he's been in a 65-year career that won't quit. "I can't see playing shuffleboard in Florida," he says. "I'm on the cutting edge of the twilight of life." His is a life in love with cold vertical surfaces. He climbed Mt.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | NOA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It doesn't get much more romantic than this. As the Indian Ocean gently laps against a ship sailing into the night, a fax machine twitches to life. To Mae, from Ben: "As a youth I met and loved a girl named Mae / and although I loved her, irrationally, I let her get away. . . ." After 44 years and four days of waiting, this transatlantic proposal in verse was met with teenage ebullience. Of course Mae would marry Ben. That was last spring. Mae Billet Ziskin first met Ben Rosenbaum in 1954.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, Times Staff Writer
Elaine Brown, 82, says playing pool with the guys at the Glendale Adult Recreation Center keeps her mind sharp. Elaine Brown squints, draws back the pool cue, strikes the ball and squeals with delight as it rolls into a corner pocket. "When you shoot, you try to make the shot or leave the ball in a good position for your partner. You want your opponent in the worse position," Brown says, sounding as if she is giving away a trade secret. "That's the name of the game."
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At home on his dusty rural horse ranch, Frank Hyde embodies the courtly graces of a gentleman cowboy. The plain-spoken man with the weather-etched face coos to horses and charms women. His turquoise shirt with the opalescent snaps is trimly tucked into gray boot-cut Levi's. Hyde's patinaed saddle bears his name, embossed in leather. But don't be fooled. This octogenarian equestrian has the reflexes of a twentysomething, and the accolades to prove it.
NEWS
June 24, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
Things were pretty quiet around the Mother Gertrude Balcazar Home for Senior Citizens on Monday--until the Golden Dreams showed up. With verve and vitality, the octogenarian troupe, led by music teacher Violeta Quintero, entertained their peers with Mexican folk-style songs they composed about the trials and triumphs of living.
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