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SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
With so many new faces arriving at the trading deadline, the wonder is less how they'll all influence a winning clubhouse than the individual players left behind. Or is the end of the Dee Gordon experiment, circa 2012? The addition of Hanley Ramirez and Shane Victorino doesn't bode well for Gordon, at least not for this season. Don Mattingly keeps saying if all things are equal, when Ramirez has taken enough infield at shortstop and feels comfortable returning there, that will be his ultimate destination this season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Wielding silence as deftly as he harnessed speech, British playwright Harold Pinter wrote plays that have the precision of musical scores. Much of the joy in encountering these extravagantly minimalist works in performance is noticing where the stresses have been placed and interpretive liberties taken. "Betrayal," first produced in London in 1978, is the Pinter play that has lately been drawing the starriest interpreters. In Ian Rickson's 2011 West End revival, Kristin Scott Thomas was like an icy cinder, coolly burning her way to the heart of this drama that lays bare the gamesmanship of marital infidelity.
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SPORTS
October 4, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
Dee Gordon, that bright shortstop of the Dodgers' future? Exactly where is he now? Out there in limbo land. After a disappointing first full season, the addition of Hanley Ramirez and the unexpected emergence of Luis Cruz, Gordon is currently with his nose to the Dodgers' window. When Gordon when down with an injured thumb on July 4, he was expected to reclaim his starting position upon his return. He never started another game. Meanwhile, the power-hitting Ramirez arrived and Cruz defied expectations.
SPORTS
July 6, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Hanley Ramirez said the defense, rather than Stephen Fife, was responsible for the Dodgers' 4-2 loss to the San Francisco Giants on Saturday at AT&T Park. "I let him down a little bit today," said Ramirez, who made one of the Dodgers' three errors. Whatever the case, Fife could be out of the rotation soon, as the Dodgers acquired Ricky Nolasco from the Miami Marlins. In exchange for Nolasco and $197,000 worth of cap space they can use to sign international amateur players, the Dodgers sent the Marlins three pitching prospects: triple-A relievers Josh Wall and Steven Ames, and Class-A starter Angel Sanchez.
OPINION
February 22, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
Maybe anyone who voluntarily runs the gantlet we call our presidential election process must be mentally imbalanced in some respect, but this year's crop of Republican candidates has been especially odd. Of the four who remain viable, only Mitt Romney can pass as normal - and he has that eerie, Stepford-wife quality of being so normal he's weird. Upon first exposure, it doesn't take long to identify Ron Paul as a charming old crank, or Newt Gingrich as an egomaniac who imagines that the voices he hears in his head are the call of destiny.
OPINION
January 25, 2011 | Jim Newton
Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich is a refreshing presence at City Hall. He exists outside its main political currents and is uninhibited by its usual constraints. He's also, well, a bit odd. In a city government dominated by the slick and the connected, Trutanich is gruff and emotional. He's built like an old-school boxer, barrel-chested, with big hands. He calls himself a "knucklehead," insists he's not a "bellyacher," laughs boisterously at his own jokes. He loves to talk ?
OPINION
July 7, 2005
President Bush conceded Wednesday that global warming is a real environmental problem and that human-caused pollution worsens it. "Listen, I recognize the surface of the Earth is warmer," Bush told reporters in Denmark, "and that an increase in greenhouse gases caused by humans is contributing to the problem."
SPORTS
March 15, 2001 | THOMAS BONK
Now that the ice particles have settled after Tuesday's NHL trading deadline, the issue for the Kings is no longer who they traded, but who stayed in goal. It's crowded in the net now that the Kings will go the rest of the way with three goalies: Felix Potvin, Jamie Storr and Stephane Fiset. Potvin is the clear No. 1, but Coach Andy Murray also says there is a clear No. 2, and that is Storr.
SPORTS
September 7, 1986 | KEN DENLINGER, The Washington Post
Some men get violent. When others are cut in professional sport, they rant in public and weep in private. A few accept the decision stoically, team players to the end. Nobody ever left the NFL quite the way Babe Laufenberg did the Redskins last month. All four television stations were on hand at Redskin Park; he was photographed from the time he arrived, in a pin-striped suit, to his final interview, given close to a sign that said: "No admittance."
SPORTS
May 22, 2003 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
Mickey Callaway knew that Aaron Sele's return from off-season shoulder surgery was going to result in either a return to triple-A Salt Lake or a move to the bullpen, but he probably never envisioned becoming what seems like the forgotten man on the Angel staff. "There's no telling how often he's going to pitch," pitching coach Bud Black said of Callaway. "We'll just have to see how his appearances go."
SPORTS
March 3, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
A day after the Kings suffered one of their worst losses this season, goalie Jonathan Quick found himself surrounded by familiar allies, all of them saying mea culpa . Little went well in a 5-2 loss to the Canucks at Vancouver on Saturday night, but everyone was lining up Sunday to share the blame. Quick is often his own worst critic and he had accepted responsibility immediately after the loss. As Kings defenseman Drew Doughty pointed out: "Quickie can't take the blame for that — some of those goals were two-on-ones, or shots that are going high, back-door passes, so definitely don't blame the game on Quickie.
SPORTS
October 4, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
Dee Gordon, that bright shortstop of the Dodgers' future? Exactly where is he now? Out there in limbo land. After a disappointing first full season, the addition of Hanley Ramirez and the unexpected emergence of Luis Cruz, Gordon is currently with his nose to the Dodgers' window. When Gordon when down with an injured thumb on July 4, he was expected to reclaim his starting position upon his return. He never started another game. Meanwhile, the power-hitting Ramirez arrived and Cruz defied expectations.
SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
With so many new faces arriving at the trading deadline, the wonder is less how they'll all influence a winning clubhouse than the individual players left behind. Or is the end of the Dee Gordon experiment, circa 2012? The addition of Hanley Ramirez and Shane Victorino doesn't bode well for Gordon, at least not for this season. Don Mattingly keeps saying if all things are equal, when Ramirez has taken enough infield at shortstop and feels comfortable returning there, that will be his ultimate destination this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Is a strain of recent abstract painting obsessed with revitalizing the celebrated tradition of the 1950s New York School? A peculiar new show at the Museum of Contemporary Art says yes, proposing that a vigorous revival of Jackson Pollock's drips, Mark Rothko's luminous clouds of color, Franz Kline's muscularity of forms and other painterly concerns from a half-century ago is underway - albeit with a notable twist. The old abstraction recorded the singular hand of the artist at work in the studio.
SPORTS
March 19, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Alex Smith appeared to be the odd man out in San Francisco. The Miami Dolphins were already one of the odd teams out in the Peyton Manning derby. Sounded like a match made in heaven ... or at least a match made on the Island of Misfit Toys. While free-agent quarterback Smith was considering a three-year offer from San Francisco, the team he led to the NFC championship game last season, members of the 49ers hopped a plane to North Carolina to watch Manning work out. Meanwhile, Manning informed the Dolphins last week that they were no longer in the running for his services.
OPINION
February 22, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
Maybe anyone who voluntarily runs the gantlet we call our presidential election process must be mentally imbalanced in some respect, but this year's crop of Republican candidates has been especially odd. Of the four who remain viable, only Mitt Romney can pass as normal - and he has that eerie, Stepford-wife quality of being so normal he's weird. Upon first exposure, it doesn't take long to identify Ron Paul as a charming old crank, or Newt Gingrich as an egomaniac who imagines that the voices he hears in his head are the call of destiny.
SPORTS
December 3, 1986
George Halas, the father of the National Football League, was a shrewd operator who became the winningest coach in the game, but he did make mistakes. One of the biggest was letting Bobby Layne get away from the Chicago Bears after his rookie year in 1948. Layne, who died Monday, explained it this way: "Johnny Lujack and I were rookies together at Chicago. Mr. Halas thought Sid Luckman was going to retire, but Sid decided to play two or three more years. "Mr. Halas was a great man.
SPORTS
January 26, 1996 | LARRY STEWART
Dick Enberg, liked by almost everyone, has announced six Super Bowls. Phil Simms, finishing a solid rookie season in the broadcast booth, has played in two. "I've watched 29 of 'em," says Paul Maguire, the odd one of the three-man announcing team who will be working Sunday's Super Bowl for NBC. It's hard to put your finger on it, but there's a certain appeal to Maguire. It's certainly not his looks. He will tell you he was fired by NBC in 1979 for being so darn ugly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2011 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
Magician Rob Zabrecky has a bar of skeleton-shaped soap in his bathroom in the Valley, even though Halloween isn't on the horizon yet. The skeleton, like so much about Zabrecky, is a manifestation of his obsession with the macabre. It's an obsession he has cultivated for the last 12 years, eventually embodying it in the persona of his alter ego — a darkly comic character called Odd Man. At Hollywood's Magic Castle, where Zabrecky is a member, he performs as Odd Man, but his shows are short and completely devoted to his theatrical brand of magic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2011 | By Anne Loader McGee
Late one afternoon a young girl with a large basket was seen hurrying along a dirt road toward a distant forest. Suddenly from out of the bushes jumped an impish man dressed in a red velvet vest and leather breeches. The girl came to a startled halt. "What do you have in that basket?" the man demanded to know. "Pies and goodies for a sick lady," the girl replied fearlessly. The mischievous man grinned. Then he began to whirl in a frantic circle. His shirt billowed out like sails in a wind and fine powdery dust rose in the air as his turned-up shoes shuffled faster and faster.
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