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BUSINESS
March 29, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The economy is moving faster in the U.S. than it is across the pond, according to a new OECD report predicting that domestic growth will outstrip Europe's. The U.S. economy will expand at a 2.9% annual rate in the first quarter and then a 2.8% rate in the second, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development . That's much faster than the 1.9% overall growth rate forecast for the advanced nations considered to be in the Group of Seven. The credit goes to the rebounding stock market in the U.S., as well as consumer confidence that is near one-year highs and promising movements in the job market, according to the OECD.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 1996 | From Reuters
The U.S. economy is growing robustly, Japan seems well on the road to economic recovery and Europe could join them with an upturn later this year, but unemployment remains a worry, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Thursday. The OECD said in its semiannual Economic Outlook that it expected growth in its 27-member countries to average 2.1% this year, marginally more than last year. Growth is seen rising to 2.5% in 1997.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Economic growth in the industrialized world will continue for an eighth straight year in 1990 at the start of a decade that promises far-reaching if unpredictable changes, the OECD said Thursday. The 24-nation think tank said in its latest semiannual outlook that economic reform in Eastern Europe should benefit both East Bloc countries and their trading partners in the West.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
After a two-day lobbying blitz among the world's richest nations, the United States and Japan both claimed moral victory Wednesday in their trade dispute. The annual ministerial meeting of the 25-nation Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development provided no grounds for optimism that a solution to the row over automobile parts is in sight. "We don't want to fight," U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown said.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Wednesday called on the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development--often known as the West's "rich man's club"--to expand its vision and mandate to accommodate the post-Cold War world. "We cannot allow new divisions to arise. Europe must not be split into zones of prosperity and poverty, stability and insecurity," he said at the OECD's annual ministerial meeting, where Mexico became the group's first new member in more than 20 years.
WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Aaron Wiener and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
BERLIN - If it seems to German Chancellor Angela Merkel that the world is against her, she may be right. Her insistence that debt-ridden European nations cut their way out of financial crises helped cost her conservative political party two state elections this month, exposed her to criticism as an inflexible taskmaster across the Eurozone and unleashed a torrent of anti-austerity venting that has toppled like-thinking national and regional leaders...
WORLD
September 1, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
The approach of a powerful hurricane on Monday prompted officials to move an international tax gathering away from Baja California. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said the two-day meeting would be shifted to Mexico City today and Wednesday to avoid possible dangers from Hurricane Jimena. The group was to have met in Los Cabos, on the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula, which stands in the likely path of the storm. Jimena, a Category 4 hurricane with top sustained winds of 155 mph, churned well off Mexico's Pacific coast on Monday as it moved slowly toward Baja California.
WORLD
April 19, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Lomas de Chapultepec, a neighborhood of huge homes behind high stone and brick walls, wakes up each morning to the sound of sweeping. As the dawn's dark fades to light, servants emerge from behind gates and, with witches' brooms, brush away the leaves and twigs and lavender jacaranda petals that have fallen overnight. Maids in pastel uniforms, security guards, gardeners and chauffeurs — these are the public denizens of this super-rich enclave. The actual homeowners and permanent residents are rarely seen.
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