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BUSINESS
June 21, 1996 | From Reuters
The U.S. economy is growing robustly, Japan seems well on the road to economic recovery and Europe could join them with an upturn later this year, but unemployment remains a worry, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Thursday. The OECD said in its semiannual Economic Outlook that it expected growth in its 27-member countries to average 2.1% this year, marginally more than last year. Growth is seen rising to 2.5% in 1997.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
After a two-day lobbying blitz among the world's richest nations, the United States and Japan both claimed moral victory Wednesday in their trade dispute. The annual ministerial meeting of the 25-nation Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development provided no grounds for optimism that a solution to the row over automobile parts is in sight. "We don't want to fight," U.S. Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown said.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1995 | Bloomberg Business News
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has revised downward its economic growth forecasts for most of its 25 member countries for this year and next. The predictions were released at a news conference at the OECD, which is holding its 34th ministerial meeting today and Wednesday. A fuller report on economic forecasts will be issued in June. For the OECD as a whole, the organization sees GDP growing by 2.7% in 1995 and 1996. That compares to December estimates of 3% and 2.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has revised down its economic growth forecasts for most of its 25 member countries for this year and next. The predictions were released at a news conference at the OECD, which is holding its 34th ministerial meeting today and Wednesday. A fuller report on economic forecasts will be issued in June. Such forecasts are issued twice yearly, in June and December.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher on Wednesday called on the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development--often known as the West's "rich man's club"--to expand its vision and mandate to accommodate the post-Cold War world. "We cannot allow new divisions to arise. Europe must not be split into zones of prosperity and poverty, stability and insecurity," he said at the OECD's annual ministerial meeting, where Mexico became the group's first new member in more than 20 years.
NEWS
September 10, 1991
Compulsory schooling has been extended in some countries, but even more striking is growing demand for education at both the pre-primary school and post-secondary school levels. Among member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, school enrollment rates for very young children are "significantly higher" than 10-15 years ago. One reason: A rising demand among working parents for their young children.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1990 | Reuters
Farm subsidies and import barriers cost the world's riches nations $72 billion a year in list income, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, an international economic research group, said in a report. Agricultural policies waste resources by overstimulating output in farming and food processing and pushing up land and consumer food prices, the study said.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Economic growth in the industrialized world will continue for an eighth straight year in 1990 at the start of a decade that promises far-reaching if unpredictable changes, the OECD said Thursday. The 24-nation think tank said in its latest semiannual outlook that economic reform in Eastern Europe should benefit both East Bloc countries and their trading partners in the West.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1989 | From Reuters
The United States, its economy menaced by inflation, must rapidly take steps to cut the federal budget deficit after four years of missed targets, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Thursday. In its semiannual report, OECD, a leading organization of industrialized nations, predicted that the Bush Administration will fail to meet its targets to reduce the budget deficit. It doubted whether the shortfall would be eliminated by 1993, as required by law. It also questioned the White House's view that U.S. inflation, which has risen sharply over the past year, is truly headed lower.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1989 | From United Press International
Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady today urged West Germany and Japan to reduce trade surpluses at the start of a two-day economic conference dominated by friction over U.S. trade policy toward Japan. "The industrial countries have agreed that reducing the large existing trade and current account imbalances is a matter of priority," Brady told the conference of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. "Japan's trade surplus declined modestly last year but has increased for three consecutive quarters," Brady said.
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