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Ofer Nimrodi

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NEWS
October 23, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the peace process. Israelis these days are riveted by a pair of sexy scandals involving alleged murder-for-hire and top-level corruption and reaching into the echelons of the rich, famous and very powerful. On Friday, authorities confirmed what Israelis had been talking about much of the week: The publisher of a popular daily newspaper and scion of a powerful business dynasty is under investigation to determine whether he conspired to kill three people.
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NEWS
October 23, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the peace process. Israelis these days are riveted by a pair of sexy scandals involving alleged murder-for-hire and top-level corruption and reaching into the echelons of the rich, famous and very powerful. On Friday, authorities confirmed what Israelis had been talking about much of the week: The publisher of a popular daily newspaper and scion of a powerful business dynasty is under investigation to determine whether he conspired to kill three people.
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NEWS
October 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
An Israeli court convicted a former newspaper publisher of breach of trust and intimidating a witness, but in a plea bargain dropped a charge that he tried to arrange the murder of a witness. Ofer Nimrodi, whose family partially owns the Maariv daily, will be sentenced within a few days. Nimrodi had been accused of attempting to hire somebody to kill private investigator Yaakov Tsur, a prosecution witness in an earlier wiretapping case that ended in a plea bargain, with the charge dropped.
NEWS
December 27, 1999 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sensational case that has portrayed a world of high-level corruption and seedy business tactics, Israeli prosecutors charged a prominent newspaper publisher Sunday with plotting murder and bribing witnesses and police in an attempt to subvert the justice system.
NEWS
April 29, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the sort of scandal that Israel's two brash tabloids--Maariv and Yediot Aharonot--normally love to pursue: Someone illegally wiretapped dozens of senior Israeli politicians, top reporters and even the Shin Bet, the nation's internal security service. But no one at the newspapers has much stomach for reporting the affair, after police last week locked up Maariv's publisher and Yediot's editor in chief for alleged involvement in the scheme.
WORLD
March 10, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
Media Titan to Rivals: Drop Dead! edia Titan to Rivals: Drop Dead! That's tabloid shorthand for the Darwinian clash unfolding between Israel's three biggest newspaper barons. The story begins with a publicity-shy publisher who built a paper so popular and powerful it was deemed a monopoly. Nipping at his heels is a scrappy businessman who once wiretapped competitors and later destroyed an incriminating document by swallowing it. But it didn't become a battle royal until a Jewish-American billionaire, borrowing a page from Fox News, launched a "fair and balanced" newspaper to counter what he called liberal media.
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