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NEWS
October 8, 1994 | Associated Press
The Senate early Friday confirmed Alice Rivlin to be director of the Office of Management and Budget. Confirmation came on a voice vote. Rivlin, 63, is the first woman to direct the budget office. She fills the vacancy caused when Leon E. Panetta left to become White House chief of staff.
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NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Kathleen Sebelius, who helped guide the rocky and controversial rollout of President Obama's landmark healthcare law, is stepping down as Health and Human Services secretary after about five years, according to a senior administration official. In her place, the president plans to nominate Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget. Sebelius was not pressured to resign, according to the administration official. But she leaves after presiding over the disastrous launch of the health law's new online insurance marketplaces last fall.
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NEWS
February 16, 1989
Frank Hodsoll, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts for the last seven years, has been appointed executive associate director and chief financial officer of the Office of Management and Budget, the White House announced. Before leaving for Minnesota and Los Angeles to announce a new series of arts grants, Hodsoll told top staffers at the endowment about the appointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2012 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Roy L. Ash, a co-founder and former president of Litton Industries who served as director of the Office of Management and Budget in the 1970s during the Nixon and Ford administrations, has died. He was 93. Ash, who had Parkinson's disease, died Dec. 14 at his home in Los Angeles, said his wife, Lila. A Los Angeles native, Ash was chief financial officer of Hughes Aircraft Co. in Culver City before partnering with former Hughes colleague Charles B. "Tex" Thornton in 1953 in a new company that soon led to the acquisition of a small microwave tube firm owned by Charles Litton in the Bay Area community of San Carlos.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Budget Director James C. Miller III is resigning effective Oct. 15 and will be replaced by his deputy, Joseph R. Wright Jr., President Reagan announced Wednesday. Miller will become a fellow of the Center for Study of Public Choice at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., a Washington suburb.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush on Wednesday picked former Louisiana GOP congressman W. Henson Moore for the No. 2 job at the Energy Department and selected attorney William M. Diefenderfer III to be second in command at the Office of Management and Budget. For the No. 2 spot at the Pentagon, Bush chose automotive executive Donald J. Atwood.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Senate confirmed Josh Bolten as budget director Thursday, an approval that came ahead of the annual spending battle between the White House and Congress. Bolten was confirmed without debate by the full Senate after the Governmental Affairs Committee approved him on a voice vote earlier in the day. He had drawn bipartisan praise from the panel's members. Bolten, 48, has been Bush's deputy chief of staff for policy.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | Associated Press
The Senate confirmed Franklin D. Raines on Friday to be President Clinton's budget chief, ending a near five-month delay by Republicans demanding more details about White House spending plans. The voice vote will allow Raines, now a top executive at the Fannie Mae home-loan bank, to replace Alice Rivlin as director of the Office of Management and Budget. Rivlin was named to the Federal Reserve Board. "I think this is the right thing to do," Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) said.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
President Bush, accusing Democrats of breaking last fall's budget deal, threatened a flurry of vetoes on Friday to cancel any effects of a House vote limiting the authority of his budget office. Bush told a meeting of House Republicans at the White House that a rules-change vote in the House on Thursday "undercut the credibility of the entire budget agreement," according to presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater. "A deal is a deal. Let's stick by it," Fitzwater said.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last autumn's battle over the budget erupted anew Thursday as Democrats angered Republicans by trying to seize more control over how budget numbers are computed. In one of the first official acts of the 102nd Congress, the House adopted rules giving Congress, instead of the White House, the power to referee any disputes over the spending limits enacted as part of last fall's compromise deficit-reduction package.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2003 | Miguel Bustillo, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration Tuesday opened 300,000 more acres of Alaska's Tongass National Forest to logging by exempting it from a Clinton-era rule that barred road-building in most of the 17-million-acre area, the biggest expanse of temperate rain forest left on the planet. The widely expected decision by the U.S. Department of Agriculture stemmed from the Bush administration's settlement of a lawsuit by the state of Alaska.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Senate confirmed Josh Bolten as budget director Thursday, an approval that came ahead of the annual spending battle between the White House and Congress. Bolten was confirmed without debate by the full Senate after the Governmental Affairs Committee approved him on a voice vote earlier in the day. He had drawn bipartisan praise from the panel's members. Bolten, 48, has been Bush's deputy chief of staff for policy.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2003 | From Associated Press
President Bush has chosen aide Mark Everson to be commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, tapping a top manager from within the White House to head the nation's tax-collection agency. Everson is a deputy director of the White House Office of Management and Budget. During President Reagan's administration, Everson served in the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Justice Department and the U.S. Information Agency. The IRS nomination requires Senate approval.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Proposals to shift research programs at the Smithsonian elsewhere would cut at the heart of the institution's contribution to science, a special commission charged Friday. "The disruptive potential is mind-boggling," said Jeremy A. Sabloff, chairman of a commission formed earlier this year to study Smithsonian science programs and recommend improvements.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
The Clinton administration will issue a new rule today to make it harder for companies that have violated labor, tax or other federal laws to win government contracts, the Office of Management and Budget said Tuesday. The regulation, dubbed the "blacklisting" rule by industry critics, will take effect Jan. 19, one day before President Clinton's administration turns over the White House to Republican President-elect George W. Bush.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Senate voted Friday to fill vacancies in two top Clinton administration posts, confirming the nominations of Bill Richardson as Energy secretary and Jack Lew as budget director. Both were confirmed by voice vote amid a cluster of lesser nominations and other votes before the Senate adjourned for its August recess. The House is scheduled to leave in a week.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | Associated Press
The Senate confirmed Franklin D. Raines on Friday to be President Clinton's budget chief, ending a near five-month delay by Republicans demanding more details about White House spending plans. The voice vote will allow Raines, now a top executive at the Fannie Mae home-loan bank, to replace Alice Rivlin as director of the Office of Management and Budget. Rivlin was named to the Federal Reserve Board. "I think this is the right thing to do," Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caught up in a battle with Clinton Administration budget-cutters over how to trim costs at the General Services Administration, agency chief Roger W. Johnson is firing salvos at bureaucrats and politicians, contending they are refusing to abide by the voter mandate from last November's election to downsize government. Johnson, former chief executive officer of Western Digital Corp.
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