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BUSINESS
February 6, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The key to understanding the massive $1.45-trillion federal budget--and what it means for the U. S. economy--is in the numbers you don't see. The budget deficit, for example, is even larger than the $280 billion acknowledged by the Bush Administration on Monday as it submitted its fiscal 1992 spending plan to Congress. That deficit calculation for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1 includes roughly $75 billion borrowed from the Social Security trust fund's reserve for future retirees.
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NEWS
February 14, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The budget deficit has been eliminated. Washington is looking at massive surpluses as far as the eye can see--the biggest piles of cash the federal government has ever accumulated. And at precisely this moment of plenty, President Bush is trying to abruptly tighten the spigot on government spending in all but a few key areas.
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NEWS
November 22, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President-elect George Bush, reaching again into the ranks of Reagan Administration officials, announced Monday that he wants to keep Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos and that he will nominate Richard G. Darman to be his budget director. All five of Bush's Cabinet-level appointees so far have worked for the current Administration.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Acting to preserve a bipartisan budget-trimming deal, President Clinton's budget chief has ordered federal agencies to freeze any funding covered by a $16-billion spending-cut bill that stalled in the Senate last month, officials said Thursday. Alice Rivlin, director of the Office of Management and Budget, has ordered federal department heads to observe the limits imposed by the spending-cut bill as if the measure had already passed.
NEWS
February 14, 2001 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The budget deficit has been eliminated. Washington is looking at massive surpluses as far as the eye can see--the biggest piles of cash the federal government has ever accumulated. And at precisely this moment of plenty, President Bush is trying to abruptly tighten the spigot on government spending in all but a few key areas.
NEWS
July 7, 1995 | DOYLE McMANUS and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Acting to preserve a bipartisan budget-trimming deal, President Clinton's budget chief has ordered federal agencies to freeze any funding covered by a $16-billion spending-cut bill that stalled in the Senate last month, officials said Thursday. Alice Rivlin, director of the Office of Management and Budget, has ordered federal department heads to observe the limits imposed by the spending-cut bill as if the measure had already passed.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
A liberal citizens lobby assailed the Reagan Administration Thursday for an "obsession with secrecy" and said a new opinion poll shows that 68% of Americans believe "the government is not open enough."
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | ART PINE and TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writers
The man President-elect George Bush has named to be his new budget director is widely acknowledged to be a pragmatic, brilliant policy strategist with a proven ability to get things done--and a reputation as a ruthless and abrasive infighter. Hard-charging, quick-thinking and witty, with a penchant for detail, Richard G. Darman, deputy secretary of the Treasury until last year, was clearly one of the brightest intellects in the Reagan Administration.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for workers and consumers, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the White House may not block regulations intended to warn employees about the dangers of hazardous chemicals in their workplace. Both sides in the dispute predicted that the ruling will have wide ramifications. Public interest lawyers said it could lead to more public disclosures on everything from food nutrition to the dangers of tampons.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday abolished the controversial Council on Competitiveness, which had been chaired by former Vice President Dan Quayle, and watched as his Cabinet--with the glaring exception of an attorney general--was sworn into office. While the council had no statutory authority over regulatory policy, the George Bush Administration used it as an informal arbiter of regulations.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The key to understanding the massive $1.45-trillion federal budget--and what it means for the U. S. economy--is in the numbers you don't see. The budget deficit, for example, is even larger than the $280 billion acknowledged by the Bush Administration on Monday as it submitted its fiscal 1992 spending plan to Congress. That deficit calculation for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1 includes roughly $75 billion borrowed from the Social Security trust fund's reserve for future retirees.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for workers and consumers, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that the White House may not block regulations intended to warn employees about the dangers of hazardous chemicals in their workplace. Both sides in the dispute predicted that the ruling will have wide ramifications. Public interest lawyers said it could lead to more public disclosures on everything from food nutrition to the dangers of tampons.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President-elect George Bush, reaching again into the ranks of Reagan Administration officials, announced Monday that he wants to keep Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos and that he will nominate Richard G. Darman to be his budget director. All five of Bush's Cabinet-level appointees so far have worked for the current Administration.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | ART PINE and TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writers
The man President-elect George Bush has named to be his new budget director is widely acknowledged to be a pragmatic, brilliant policy strategist with a proven ability to get things done--and a reputation as a ruthless and abrasive infighter. Hard-charging, quick-thinking and witty, with a penchant for detail, Richard G. Darman, deputy secretary of the Treasury until last year, was clearly one of the brightest intellects in the Reagan Administration.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
A liberal citizens lobby assailed the Reagan Administration Thursday for an "obsession with secrecy" and said a new opinion poll shows that 68% of Americans believe "the government is not open enough."
NEWS
April 12, 1985 | Associated Press
Seven White House policy-making councils will be consolidated into two Cabinet-level agencies dealing with economic matters and domestic policy affairs, it was announced Thursday. President Reagan will be chairman of both panels. In his absence, they will be headed by two of his former top White House lieutenants, Treasury Secretary James A. Baker III and Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III. White House spokesman Larry Speakes said that the restructuring reflects the management style of Donald T.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
In another sign of his reluctance to interfere with foreign takeovers of U.S. corporations, President Bush on Friday approved the sale of three aerospace divisions of Fairchild Industries to Matra S.A., a French space and telecommunications company. The U.S. firms, Fairchild Communications & Electronics Co., Fairchild Control Systems and Fairchild Space Co., produce hardware and software for aerospace systems and spacecraft.
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