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Office Of National Drug Control U S

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NEWS
January 31, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House Office of Drug Control Policy on Thursday accused the Health and Human Services Department of an "unconscionable" delay in deciding whether to lift a ban on marijuana for seriously ill patients who want the drug for pain relief. In a letter to James O.
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NEWS
January 31, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House Office of Drug Control Policy on Thursday accused the Health and Human Services Department of an "unconscionable" delay in deciding whether to lift a ban on marijuana for seriously ill patients who want the drug for pain relief. In a letter to James O.
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NEWS
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL ISIKOFF and ELSA WALSH, THE WASHINGTON POST
One year after he pledged to make the District of Columbia a "test case" in the nation's drug war, national drug policy director William J. Bennett said Friday that the results of federal efforts here have been "mixed, spotty, incomplete" but that he had no intention of abandoning the city. Even though the city's homicide rate remains at a near-record level, Bennett said, there are "encouraging" signs that the worst days of the drug epidemic here may be over.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | MICHAEL ISIKOFF and ELSA WALSH, THE WASHINGTON POST
One year after he pledged to make the District of Columbia a "test case" in the nation's drug war, national drug policy director William J. Bennett said Friday that the results of federal efforts here have been "mixed, spotty, incomplete" but that he had no intention of abandoning the city. Even though the city's homicide rate remains at a near-record level, Bennett said, there are "encouraging" signs that the worst days of the drug epidemic here may be over.
WORLD
September 18, 2005 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Every few days or so, a speedboat laden with a ton or two of cocaine launches from somewhere along this country's jagged Caribbean coastline, headed for a rendezvous in deeper waters. There, the precious cargo gets transferred to a nondescript fishing vessel, which smuggles it into a port in Mexico, Haiti or elsewhere. Then the shipment hitches another ride, by sea or land, to its final destination: the streets of Los Angeles, New York and other U.S. cities, where it fetches about $100 per gram.
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