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Office Of Technology Assessment U S

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NEWS
June 17, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one can say how much the final bill will be for cleaning up the hazardous waste sites dotting neighborhoods, industrial parks and federal land across the country. Congress has appropriated $10.1 billion so far for the Superfund program alone, but even conservative estimates put the final price tag at four to five times that amount. Most independent estimates are far higher.
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NEWS
October 25, 1995 | COLLEEN KRUEGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As members of Congress evaluate the effects of spending cuts they are making to balance the federal budget, they will have to look no further than at the quality of research crossing their desks. To save $22 million a year, Congress has shut its Office of Technology Assessment, an agency created 23 years ago to help lawmakers navigate the difficult waters of scientific legislation.
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NEWS
October 25, 1995 | COLLEEN KRUEGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As members of Congress evaluate the effects of spending cuts they are making to balance the federal budget, they will have to look no further than at the quality of research crossing their desks. To save $22 million a year, Congress has shut its Office of Technology Assessment, an agency created 23 years ago to help lawmakers navigate the difficult waters of scientific legislation.
NEWS
June 23, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Republican leaders, retreating in the face of charges that they "stole" a vote to dismantle the congressional Office of Technology Assessment, allowed a second count Thursday that revived the obscure agency. The action cleared the way for passage of a $1.7-billion bill to finance Congress' operations for the fiscal year starting Oct. 1. The bill was approved by a vote of 337 to 87.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. May Be More Vulnerable to Oil Supply Cut: The United States is losing its ability to respond to disruptions in oil imports, making the nation more vulnerable to a cutoff in supply, a government report said. The report by the Office of Technology Assessment, which researches technology issues for Congress, said the country continues to grow more reliant on imported oil as domestic production declines and demand for energy increases.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Even full deployment of the best pollution control technology now available would leave dozens of American cities with unhealthy air by the turn of the century, the Office of Technology Assessment reported Monday in a gloomy assessment of the prospects for reducing urban smog.
NEWS
June 23, 1995 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Republican leaders, retreating in the face of charges that they "stole" a vote to dismantle the congressional Office of Technology Assessment, allowed a second count Thursday that revived the obscure agency. The action cleared the way for passage of a $1.7-billion bill to finance Congress' operations for the fiscal year starting Oct. 1. The bill was approved by a vote of 337 to 87.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elderly women appear to have higher death rates from cervical cancer than younger women, and screening them for the disease "is relatively cost effective for the number of lives saved," according to a federal report released Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1989
Nicholas Eberstadt ("Out of Wedlock and Into Danger," Op-Ed Page, Nov. 3) was correct in bringing the issue of the health and welfare of our children to the attention of your readers. The statistics on infant mortality are alarming indeed. According to the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment, the U.S. ranks 17th, well behind most industrialized countries in this regard. Children are also the largest single group of Americans who are living in poverty. However, his attack on "illegitimacy" is misguided and mean-spirited.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
At the research center of Nippon Electric Corp. in Kawasaki, near Tokyo, Hirokazu Goto, general manager, explains that his laboratories are pursuing research on a single memory chip that will hold 64 million bits of information--the telephone books of a dozen cities. Such a chip will require circuits so fine--less than 3-millionths of an inch apart--that any resistance to electric current would melt the circuitry.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. May Be More Vulnerable to Oil Supply Cut: The United States is losing its ability to respond to disruptions in oil imports, making the nation more vulnerable to a cutoff in supply, a government report said. The report by the Office of Technology Assessment, which researches technology issues for Congress, said the country continues to grow more reliant on imported oil as domestic production declines and demand for energy increases.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one can say how much the final bill will be for cleaning up the hazardous waste sites dotting neighborhoods, industrial parks and federal land across the country. Congress has appropriated $10.1 billion so far for the Superfund program alone, but even conservative estimates put the final price tag at four to five times that amount. Most independent estimates are far higher.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elderly women appear to have higher death rates from cervical cancer than younger women, and screening them for the disease "is relatively cost effective for the number of lives saved," according to a federal report released Tuesday.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Even full deployment of the best pollution control technology now available would leave dozens of American cities with unhealthy air by the turn of the century, the Office of Technology Assessment reported Monday in a gloomy assessment of the prospects for reducing urban smog.
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