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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2004
Lynn Smith's article on the Golden Globe Awards success of "The Office" ("The People Make This 'Office' Work", Jan. 27) stated: "Even the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. was apparently taken off guard -- the table for 'The Office' was on the ballroom's second tier, so far from the cameras that it proved difficult to even get a reaction shot of [Ricky] Gervais each time his name was announced." It said the table was in "the hinterlands." The implications are that the HFPA somehow treated Gervais and the costars and producers of "The Office" as second-class citizens and disregarded the professional needs of the Golden Globes broadcast director, Chris Donovan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 27, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
In the NBC sitcom "30 Rock," the self-absorbed television chief executive, played by Alec Baldwin, obsesses over what will happen to his career when his company ? NBC ? is taken over by Kabletown, a fictional cable systems operator from Philadelphia. On Friday the real-life cable company from Philadelphia ? Comcast Corp. ? assumes control of NBC Universal, the real-life entertainment colossus that is featured in the show. And while Steve Burke, the new chief executive of NBC Universal, is a fan of "30 Rock," one of his priorities will be to reform the NBC Universal corporate culture, one that has condoned politicking and aggrandizement, the very workplace parodied by the sitcom.
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BUSINESS
January 30, 2001 | Bonnie Harris, Bonnie Harris covers workplace issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7828 and at bonnie.harris@latimes.com
Office politics are alive and well, with managers saying they spend close to one day each week dealing with internal conflicts, rivalry disputes and other volatile situations in the workplace, according to an OfficeTeam survey. When asked how much of an executive's time is wasted dealing with company politics, the mean response from 150 managers with the country's largest 1,000 companies was 19%.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2009 | By Alana Semuels
The holiday season is upon us. Time for eggnog, caroling -- and worries about what to buy the boss. Today Alana answers your questions about gift giving and receiving. Dear Alana: I have been working in an office for a little more than a year now. Last year I did not exchange any gifts with co-workers because I was new. However, now that I have been here over a year, who am I supposed to give a card or gift to? What is appropriate? Oscar in El Monte Dear Oscar: It's a tough question.
NEWS
January 21, 1997 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Runner got a shoebox-sized space near the elevators. Martha Escutia got lots of room, lots of windows and new carpet. Tom Bordonaro went from plush to purely pedestrian, losing his wood-paneled walls and killer view. Six days after it started, the Great Legislative Office Shuffle of 1997 is essentially complete.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1998 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barbara Adler worked eight internships while she attended college at Bradley University in Peoria, Ill. But none prepared her for the office politics she confronted in her first job at a public relations firm. The 28-year-old Adler, now vice president of a Chicago public relations firm, had no one to turn to for advice on handling politically charged situations. She also often worried she wouldn't be taken seriously because of her age.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the curtain rises on Act I, dozens of dark-suited "salarymen" crammed into an imaginary train sway from side to side as they belt out: "Economic superpower Japan! We go for the gold! We push for section chief, we push for division manager." The number is from "Salaryman's Gold Medal," Japan's latest hit musical, which offers an amusing and insightful look at the tense and often frustrating company-centered life of the Japanese office worker--the salaryman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994
In Kenneth Turan's review " 'Wolf' Man Jack in the Wilds of N.Y." (June 17), he comments that "Wolf" "meanders down several paths" from a story about office politics to a story about immortality to a horror story. Turan comments on the awkwardness of putting these unrelated themes into the same film. But I feel the connection. To me, as a man who has spent many years working in a law office, "Wolf" taps into something very true. We businessmen experience pain and pleasure as passionately as an action hero.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1987
I read with interest your article on the temporary employment business, since I have been a temporary legal secretary for almost six years. One of the advantages to the employer is that a position can be covered until a permanent employee is found, and very often the temporary is offered the permanent position. So it's not necessarily a case of trying to avoid putting another secretary on the payroll. The advantages to the secretary are that the pay per hour is better, you're above office politics and never are taken for granted--not if they want you to stay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1996 | Jerry Hicks
Do you work in an office environment but hate your job? Unhappy with slow advancement? Not thrilled with some of your co-workers? Brace yourself: You could be part of the problem. I've worked in an office my entire career. A time or two I've been less than a happy camper. On those occasions I was always convinced the fault lay with someone else, certainly not at my doorstep.
BOOKS
June 1, 2008 | Ellen Slezak, Ellen Slezak is the author of the story collection "Last Year's Jesus" and the novel "All These Girls."
Gary Amdahl has observed office politics up close. He reads the Wall Street Journal and the Nation. He's a fan of C-SPAN. He's read Barthelme, Bulgakov, Melville and Swift -- even such business books as "Who Moved My Cheese?"
BOOKS
March 11, 2007 | Darcy Cosper, Darcy Cosper contributes to publications including Bookforum and Time Out New York.
JOSHUA FERRIS' deceptively modest debut novel, "Then We Came to the End," opens as the halcyon days of the dot-com decade are coming to a close for the staff of a large, unnamed Chicago advertising agency. The carefree age of pushing one another down the hall really fast in swivel chairs has given way to a considerably less pleasant period of corporate downsizing.
MAGAZINE
July 16, 2006 | Milt Policzer
From Oldham vs. Larry Flynt in Los Angeles County Superior Court: The plaintiff was informed that Flynt's wife worked on the 10th floor "and that if Mrs. Flynt ever attempted to gain access to Flynt while engaged with prostitutes behind closed doors that Plaintiff was to divert and distract Mrs. Flynt at all costs until Flynt could get the prostitutes out of the building."
OPINION
May 19, 2005
Re "Faithful Are Carving Niche in the Workplace," May 15: Corporate America is making a huge mistake by making concessions to evangelicals who, like all of their fundamentalist soul mates (including the Taliban in Afghanistan and the Saudi Wahhabi Muslims who perpetrated 9/11) will stop at nothing to spread their intolerant vision of how society should function. Anyone who thinks these fanatics will be content with the current workplace accommodations is mistaken. They don't want to be part of the mainstream; they want to take over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2002 | MANUEL GAMIZ Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter announced plans Friday to open two field offices in the San Fernando Valley in early July to serve residents in her newly redrawn council district. "My new constituents may not have elected me, but they will be getting an unparalleled level of service," she said in a statement. To create another Valley district, the council moved the 6th District, which consisted of parts of West Los Angeles, Venice and Crenshaw, to the East Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Bill Campbell, who must leave his seat because of term limits, became the first candidate to announce that he will run for Orange County Supervisor Todd Spitzer's seat should Spitzer be elected in November to Campbell's legislative seat. Campbell (R-Villa Park) declared his intentions Tuesday--seven months before the November election, when Spitzer faces Democrat Bea Foster, a Santa Ana teacher. The winner will be sworn in Dec. 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2002 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From attorney general to state treasurer, Republican candidates are clear underdogs in every down-ballot contest this fall, a predicament that reflects the flagging political fortunes of the California GOP in recent years. The Republicans' longshot status is the logical consequence of prior election defeats.
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