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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2012 | Steve Lopez
On the morning of July 10, attorney Jerald Gale was reading an e-mail in his office on the 20th floor of a Koreatown high-rise. That's the last thing the 58-year-old husband, father and avid cyclist remembers before losing consciousness. Gale's heart had gone into sudden cardiac arrest. It wasn't a heart attack, in which blockage cuts off blood flow to the heart. In sudden cardiac arrest, the heart stops pumping because of an electrical problem caused by a rhythm disorder. Gale had been treated for some blockage six years ago, but he was healthy again and under the care of a cardiologist, and he'd had no warning signs that anything was wrong.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
With more than 300 movies showing at the Toronto International Film Festival, there is bound to be some overlap. Jesse Eisenberg acts in two films world premiering at the Canadian event, while Mia Wasikowska performs in three screening there. But the multiplicities are especially manifold for their movie "The Double," director Richard Ayoade's examination of the horror of encountering your better self. A loose adaptation of the Fyodor Dostoevsky novella first published in 1846, "The Double" stars Eisenberg in a dual role in a tale of identity, paranoia and the relentless grip of self-loathing.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA
Some office workers in Orange County will see modest pay increases this year, while others will experience a decline in pay. This good news-bad news scenario was one of the findings of a recent survey of county employers by Thomas Staffing, the Irvine-based temporary employment agency. Conducted in the fourth quarter of 1996, the study found that executive secretaries and administrative assistants are expected to receive the highest average starting salaries this year.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2013 | By Tina Susman
CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Gunfire echoed through the building as office workers pushed a heavy table across the doorway and turned out the lights. They flattened themselves against the wall. One woman hoisted a chair high over her head. Another stood ready to hurl a juice bottle. All eyes were on the door, the only thing separating them from a man with a gun. When he pushed his way into the room, they pounced. One woman used her hand to force the gun's muzzle downward. A colleague kicked the back of the assailant's knees, knocking him to the ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Melanie Brown and Joey Fatone have a new role to add to their scarily similar resumes: TLC host. The duo will co-host "The Singing Office," a tongue-in-cheek singing competition that pits different groups of employees against each other. Both Brown and Fatone were members of chart-topping pop quintets, both finished in second place on ABC's "Dancing With the Stars" and both have starred in "Rent" on Broadway. "It's not like 'American Idol' or 'Dancing With the Stars,' " Brown said while filming at the Long Beach Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1995
Police Friday detained a man in connection with the stabbings of two female office workers who were attacked during a holdup attempt at a Hollywood high-rise Thursday. The suspect, described only as 33 years old, reportedly had been seen lurking near the First Interstate Building on the 6200 block of Sunset Boulevard before the crimes occurred. A police spokesman said the victims, Anna Garamvolgyi, 35, and Armida Parry, 44, would be asked to try to identify the man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1991
The city is sponsoring a free health lecture on Thursday for chair-bound office workers prone to minor aches. The class, "Keeping Fit for Those Who Sit," will demonstrate fitness techniques for anyone spending long stretches of time in a chair. Taught by a recreational therapist from St. Joseph Hospital, the class begins at 7 p.m. at St. Joseph Irvine Health Center, 4050 Barranca Parkway, Irvine. Registration is required.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1988 | JOHN O'DELL, Times Staff Writer
The first half of 1988 promises to hold good news for trained office workers, particularly operators of word processing equipment, according to a recent survey by a major clerical employment agency. The annual study by Irvine-based Thomas Temporaries shows that 28% of the businesses in Orange County plan to increase the size of their permanent office staffs during the first six months of the year, compared with 26% statewide. And only 6.
NEWS
April 6, 1986 | JANICE MALL
Advocacy organizations such as 9 to 5 National Assn. of Working Women and the Service Employees International Union have been warning for some time that the trend toward automation of offices presents threats to the health and economic futures of clerical workers. Now the economic concern has been confirmed by the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment in a major report, requested by Congress, on the future of America's offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998
Office workers were still traumatized Wednesday by the suicide earlier this week of a man who jumped to his death from high atop a building and landed on the sidewalk in a shower of broken glass. Tin Wong, 39, a Los Angeles waiter, leaped to his death Monday from the 36th floor of the Bank of America Tower. The suicide forced authorities to close 6th and Flower streets for four hours, tying up rush-hour traffic.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Two window washers were rescued 46 floors above street level Wednesday afternoon after their scaffolding collapsed outside a skyscraper in midtown Manhattan. Before firefighters removed part of a window and pulled the workers inside, the two workers were calmly awaiting rescue from opposite sides of a scaffold that appeared to have buckled in the center. Two rescuers at Hearst Tower, on Eighth Avenue in Manhattan, laid atop the lip of the roof staring down at them. One worker chatted on his cellphone as rescuers milled about on the roof of the avant-garde skyscraper.
OPINION
March 3, 2013 | By Nikil Saval
When the first modern office buildings sprung up in America at the end of the 19th century, it was an unquestioned expectation that employees would show up for work there every day. Like the factory workers who came before them, office workers usually clocked in and out, and they sat at their desks - most arranged in highly regimented rows - from morning until early evening, under constant supervision. Even trips to the water cooler were often monitored. With the development of computers and more advanced telecommunications in the 1970s, some employees began to imagine a day when it might be possible to work from home, free from oversight and more in control of their work day. Today, working from home is becoming so common that the idea of making every employee come into the office five days a week seems almost tyrannical.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By F. Kathleen Foley
“Slipped Disc: A Study of the Upright Walk,” by prominent German playwright Ingrid Lausund, is the debut of Green Card Theatre, a new company dedicated to bringing playwrights from around the world to the attention of Los Angeles audiences. The play, a guest production at Son of Semele, is the first of Lausund's 30-odd plays to be produced locally.  And although the aim of Green Card is definitely an admirable one, the present production disappoints. Perhaps something was lost in Henning Bochert's somewhat prolix translation, but despite a crisp staging by director Christopher Basile, the play is so philosophically dense that meaning gets stranded on the shoals of artistic pretention.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
A free Amazon.com service that makes content-sharing easier on multiple Kindles could bring students one step closer to shedding their heavy backpacks. Called Whispercast , the service creates a single point to purchase and distribute Kindle e-books to students and office workers with wireless Internet connection. Amazon announced the launch Wednesday. A teacher or administrator can register students to the classroom's Kindles, sort them into groups by subject or grade level, then distribute readings accordingly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2012 | Steve Lopez
On the morning of July 10, attorney Jerald Gale was reading an e-mail in his office on the 20th floor of a Koreatown high-rise. That's the last thing the 58-year-old husband, father and avid cyclist remembers before losing consciousness. Gale's heart had gone into sudden cardiac arrest. It wasn't a heart attack, in which blockage cuts off blood flow to the heart. In sudden cardiac arrest, the heart stops pumping because of an electrical problem caused by a rhythm disorder. Gale had been treated for some blockage six years ago, but he was healthy again and under the care of a cardiologist, and he'd had no warning signs that anything was wrong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2012 | By Jack Dolan and Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley said Tuesday that the corruption investigation of Assessor John Noguez has grown to include multiple targets and that he intends to seek grand jury indictments in the near future. In his first public comments about the expanding criminal probe, Cooley also accused the union that represents assessor's office employees of interfering with the investigation by ordering members to refuse to cooperate without permission from Noguez's office.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Working 9 to 5 may not be everyone's idea of a great way to make a living, but in much of Southern California, having clerical skills can just about guarantee a job, a new survey suggests. One-fourth to one-half of employers in most parts of the Southland expect to be hiring office workers during the first six months of 1989, according to a survey of 1,500 California businesses by Irvine-based Thomas Temporaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It can take years to climb the corporate ladder. Brett Munger and Carlos Ariaga are hoping it will only take minutes to climb the corporate stairs, however. They are among 150 office workers who plan to stay after work today to race up the steps of the tallest skyscraper in Los Angeles. Competitors will climb to the 68th floor of the 73-story First Interstate World Center, the corn cob-like tower that since 1989 has been the tallest building west of the Mississippi.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2012 | By Lucy Kellaway
Julie Berebitsky's history of hanky-panky in U.S. offices over the last 150 years is an extraordinary achievement. To write about so much bottom-pinching, ogling and scandal without a single double entendre or levity of any sort must have taken considerable restraint. Instead, the history professor at the University of the South in Sewannee, Tenn., has chosen to present her treasure trove of saucy examples in such a relentlessly flat way that "Sex and the Office: A History of Gender, Power and Desire" is an effort to get through.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Mega Millions' $290-million jackpot is up for grabs, and office workers across the country are no doubt pooling resources to buy a bunch of tickets. But how do you keep from getting swindled? It happens, you know. Just last week, a New Jersey jury found that construction worker Americo Lopes tried to scam his co-workers out of their share of a $38.5-million jackpot by slinking off with the winning ticket purchased as part of an office pool. You could avoid a similar fate by purchasing your own Mega Millions lottery ticket before Friday's drawing . But do you really want to be the only guy or gal standing on the sidelines when your co-workers win the jackpot?
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