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Officer Laurence Powell

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1992
I feel the title "When the Self Comes First, We All Suffer" more appropriately describes the actual event that triggered the outcome of the riots rather than the rioters themselves. That Officer Laurence Powell and others were unable to say "we are human and therefore make errors in judgment occasionally. We are sorry for our inappropriate actions and the physical and emotional injuries we gave to Mr. King." Instead, they demonstrated concern only for their own welfare and not that of justice or truth; a complete disregard for others' feelings.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 6, 1996
The Times was its usual snide self when commenting on the refusal of Judge John G. Davies to add additional prison time for Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell in the Rodney King episode (editorial, Sept. 30). Regardless of the estimates, the funds raised for Koon's defense were given voluntarily by people who felt the officer had been unfairly treated by the judicial system. An unfairness encouraged by the hostility of The Times. Voluntarily, I repeat. Whereas King's payoff from the city was extortion of public funds at the highest level.
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OPINION
October 6, 1996
The Times was its usual snide self when commenting on the refusal of Judge John G. Davies to add additional prison time for Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell in the Rodney King episode (editorial, Sept. 30). Regardless of the estimates, the funds raised for Koon's defense were given voluntarily by people who felt the officer had been unfairly treated by the judicial system. An unfairness encouraged by the hostility of The Times. Voluntarily, I repeat. Whereas King's payoff from the city was extortion of public funds at the highest level.
OPINION
April 3, 1994
Rodney King was hurt pretty badly by the Los Angeles Police Department, but he survived and will be able to enjoy life again. Now he wants to be a millionaire and sues the City of Los Angeles for $9.5 million for the physical and mental pain he suffered. If the jury decides that he should get that amount, how big a pension should go to the family members of a police officer killed on duty by a hoodlum? I don't think that a police officer's pension comes even close to the amount that Rodney King wants.
OPINION
April 3, 1994
Rodney King was hurt pretty badly by the Los Angeles Police Department, but he survived and will be able to enjoy life again. Now he wants to be a millionaire and sues the City of Los Angeles for $9.5 million for the physical and mental pain he suffered. If the jury decides that he should get that amount, how big a pension should go to the family members of a police officer killed on duty by a hoodlum? I don't think that a police officer's pension comes even close to the amount that Rodney King wants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993
In response to "Justice Dept. to Appeal Powell, Koon Sentences," Sept. 28: Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell were found not guilty by a jury during a state trial. Federal Justice Department officials didn't like the results so they utilized a rarely used option to try them a second time on federal civil rights violations, which calmed the rioters. The federal jury found them guilty of violating Rodney King's civil rights. The rioters were quiet and federal Justice Department officials bragged about what a great job they did in convicting the two. The judge sentenced Koon and Powell to 30 months in federal prison, inferring that their trial was politically motivated and that Rodney King himself was a major factor in determining the actions the officers took in overcoming his resistance to a lawful arrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993 | GERALD PETIEVICH, Gerald Petievich, a former Secret Service special agent, is the author of the novel "To Live and Die in L.A." (Arbor House, 1984).
As the officers convicted in the Rodney King civil-rights trial prepare to be sentenced, U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno and FBI Director William Sessions are under a barrage of career-threatening criticism for their decision to use force at the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Tex. Can cops, even with the best equipment and training, meet the expectations of a public educated at the college of television fiction and informed by so-called media experts?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1993
The sentences given LAPD Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell are yet another indication of the subjectivity of our legal system based on how one person, the judge, perceives the situation ("Koon, Powell Get 2 1/2 Years in Prison," Aug. 5). Though saddened by the lightweight handling of this gross dereliction of duties on the part of these two men, I am not surprised. America believes in equal rights for everyone else around the world but its own citizens. This travesty highlights more than ever the need for changes in our justice system to make it a system based more on content of the crime than color of the skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County leaders, stung by the criticism heaped on their area in the wake of the King beating case verdict, expressed relief Wednesday after hearing that the chief prosecutor wants one of the defendants to be retried elsewhere. Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner said he would seek a new trial for Los Angeles Police Officer Laurence M. Powell in an urban county that reflects the ethnic makeup of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-brewing dispute among the lawyers defending the four police officers indicted by the federal government in the beating of Rodney G. King comes to a head today when U.S. District Judge John G. Davies considers whether to force one of the officers to drop the attorney who has represented him for nearly two years. "This is a critical stage in this case," said lawyer Harland W. Braun, who represents Officer Theodore J. Briseno. "It will determine a great deal about how we proceed from here."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1993
In response to "Justice Dept. to Appeal Powell, Koon Sentences," Sept. 28: Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell were found not guilty by a jury during a state trial. Federal Justice Department officials didn't like the results so they utilized a rarely used option to try them a second time on federal civil rights violations, which calmed the rioters. The federal jury found them guilty of violating Rodney King's civil rights. The rioters were quiet and federal Justice Department officials bragged about what a great job they did in convicting the two. The judge sentenced Koon and Powell to 30 months in federal prison, inferring that their trial was politically motivated and that Rodney King himself was a major factor in determining the actions the officers took in overcoming his resistance to a lawful arrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1993
The sentences given LAPD Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell are yet another indication of the subjectivity of our legal system based on how one person, the judge, perceives the situation ("Koon, Powell Get 2 1/2 Years in Prison," Aug. 5). Though saddened by the lightweight handling of this gross dereliction of duties on the part of these two men, I am not surprised. America believes in equal rights for everyone else around the world but its own citizens. This travesty highlights more than ever the need for changes in our justice system to make it a system based more on content of the crime than color of the skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993 | GERALD PETIEVICH, Gerald Petievich, a former Secret Service special agent, is the author of the novel "To Live and Die in L.A." (Arbor House, 1984).
As the officers convicted in the Rodney King civil-rights trial prepare to be sentenced, U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno and FBI Director William Sessions are under a barrage of career-threatening criticism for their decision to use force at the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Tex. Can cops, even with the best equipment and training, meet the expectations of a public educated at the college of television fiction and informed by so-called media experts?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-brewing dispute among the lawyers defending the four police officers indicted by the federal government in the beating of Rodney G. King comes to a head today when U.S. District Judge John G. Davies considers whether to force one of the officers to drop the attorney who has represented him for nearly two years. "This is a critical stage in this case," said lawyer Harland W. Braun, who represents Officer Theodore J. Briseno. "It will determine a great deal about how we proceed from here."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1992
I feel the title "When the Self Comes First, We All Suffer" more appropriately describes the actual event that triggered the outcome of the riots rather than the rioters themselves. That Officer Laurence Powell and others were unable to say "we are human and therefore make errors in judgment occasionally. We are sorry for our inappropriate actions and the physical and emotional injuries we gave to Mr. King." Instead, they demonstrated concern only for their own welfare and not that of justice or truth; a complete disregard for others' feelings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County leaders, stung by the criticism heaped on their area in the wake of the King beating case verdict, expressed relief Wednesday after hearing that the chief prosecutor wants one of the defendants to be retried elsewhere. Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner said he would seek a new trial for Los Angeles Police Officer Laurence M. Powell in an urban county that reflects the ethnic makeup of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1995
A $155-million lawsuit was filed against the city of Los Angeles, the City Council, the Los Angeles Police Commission and several other public officials over the cancellation of former LAPD Officer Laurence Powell's "welcome home" dinner that had been scheduled at the Los Angeles Police Revolver and Athletic Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1994
A march and rally will be held today at Canyon Country Park to launch a national petition campaign protesting an appeals court order that resulted in longer jail sentences for two former Los Angeles police officers convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights. The events, which will feature a speech by Rep. Howard P. (Buck) McKeon (R-Santa Clarita), will be in support of ex-Officer Laurence M. Powell and ex-Sgt. Stacey C.
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