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BUSINESS
January 19, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An inventive genius and a desktop machine spark a revolution in office technology that sends productivity soaring. In the process, America vaults to the forefront of a leading-edge industry. If you think that sounds a lot like the '70s, you're right. The 1870s, that is. Conventional wisdom has it that the modern office began with the birth of the microcomputer. Fact is, the standard equipment of the Information Age has its roots firmly planted in the industrial era.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Robert Faturechi and Ben Poston
Under fire for hiring dozens of officers with histories of serious misconduct, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca on Wednesday acknowledged shortcomings in the way his agency handled the process. "We did a job that could have been done better," Baca told reporters. "There is a reality here that certain individuals, upon scrutiny, need to be revisited and that's exactly what I intend to do. " Baca's comments came a day after county leaders demanded he investigate his department's hiring practices.
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BUSINESS
December 25, 2009 | By Ben Fritz
When "Sherlock Holmes" producer Joel Silver ran into "Avatar" director James Cameron this month in London, where both were promoting their movies, there was an undeniable tinge of rivalry. "I said to him, 'Please leave some money on the table for us,' " Silver recalled. "He said, 'Oh, people will see them both.' " With five movies opening or expanding nationwide and "Avatar" still doing business like gangbusters, the question for nearly every major studio this weekend is just how much money there is on the table.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2013
Despite background investigations that revealed wrongdoing, incompetence, or poor performance, the department still hired dozens of problem applicants in 2010, internal records show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2013
Despite background investigations that revealed wrongdoing, incompetence, or poor performance, the department still hired dozens of problem applicants in 2010, internal records show.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Historically, historical movies have trouble at the box office. Even period dramas perceived as successful had limited appeal--the much-lauded "Glory," for example, took in only about $26 million. Which is why the apparent failure of "Beloved" to strike a chord with audiences should come as no surprise--even with the massive goodwill and publicity that accompanied the film's star, Oprah Winfrey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Robert Faturechi and Ben Poston
Under fire for hiring dozens of officers with histories of serious misconduct, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca on Wednesday acknowledged shortcomings in the way his agency handled the process. "We did a job that could have been done better," Baca told reporters. "There is a reality here that certain individuals, upon scrutiny, need to be revisited and that's exactly what I intend to do. " Baca's comments came a day after county leaders demanded he investigate his department's hiring practices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First, James Parker hid the car keys so his son wouldn't drink and drive. Then he hid the guns so the troubled young man with the insatiable hunger for cocaine wouldn't shoot himself or anyone else. When the violence escalated and Parker could control his son no longer, he came to court in late 1994 and told a judge that he wanted what was best for the young man--even if that meant a long state prison term. "Terry needs serious help," Parker told authorities, according to court records.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | CECILIA BALLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army officer testified Friday that the nation's former top enlisted soldier twice asked her to go to bed with him and grabbed her by the arm in an apparent attempt to kiss her. Maj. Michelle Gunzelman, 35, is the second of six female accusers to testify in the sexual misconduct court-martial of Sgt. Maj. Gene C. McKinney, who is charged with harassing, assaulting and threatening the women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1986 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The editor of the San Diego State University campus newspaper filed suit Thursday to overturn a California State University policy prohibiting the system's 20 newspaper editorial boards from endorsing political candidates and propositions. Represented by the San Diego chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, R. Andrew Rathbone also asked U.S. District Judge Edward Schwartz to prohibit SDSU President Thomas Day from suspending him as editor of the Daily Aztec for one day.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2009 | By Ben Fritz
When "Sherlock Holmes" producer Joel Silver ran into "Avatar" director James Cameron this month in London, where both were promoting their movies, there was an undeniable tinge of rivalry. "I said to him, 'Please leave some money on the table for us,' " Silver recalled. "He said, 'Oh, people will see them both.' " With five movies opening or expanding nationwide and "Avatar" still doing business like gangbusters, the question for nearly every major studio this weekend is just how much money there is on the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Historically, historical movies have trouble at the box office. Even period dramas perceived as successful had limited appeal--the much-lauded "Glory," for example, took in only about $26 million. Which is why the apparent failure of "Beloved" to strike a chord with audiences should come as no surprise--even with the massive goodwill and publicity that accompanied the film's star, Oprah Winfrey.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | CECILIA BALLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Army officer testified Friday that the nation's former top enlisted soldier twice asked her to go to bed with him and grabbed her by the arm in an apparent attempt to kiss her. Maj. Michelle Gunzelman, 35, is the second of six female accusers to testify in the sexual misconduct court-martial of Sgt. Maj. Gene C. McKinney, who is charged with harassing, assaulting and threatening the women.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An inventive genius and a desktop machine spark a revolution in office technology that sends productivity soaring. In the process, America vaults to the forefront of a leading-edge industry. If you think that sounds a lot like the '70s, you're right. The 1870s, that is. Conventional wisdom has it that the modern office began with the birth of the microcomputer. Fact is, the standard equipment of the Information Age has its roots firmly planted in the industrial era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
First, James Parker hid the car keys so his son wouldn't drink and drive. Then he hid the guns so the troubled young man with the insatiable hunger for cocaine wouldn't shoot himself or anyone else. When the violence escalated and Parker could control his son no longer, he came to court in late 1994 and told a judge that he wanted what was best for the young man--even if that meant a long state prison term. "Terry needs serious help," Parker told authorities, according to court records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1986 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
Terms of a $500,000 endowment for a history professorship at California State University, Northridge have been agreed upon by the university and the donor, the W. P. Whitsett Foundation, the university announced Tuesday. The agreement appeared to resolve a dispute within the CSUN history department over several conditions in the foundation's original proposal, which some history professors said infringed on academic freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2007 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
If you want to rile a historic preservationist in Santa Ana, the way to do it has become pretty clear -- as clear as glass. For the second time in as many years, preservationists are protesting a glass-facade building proposed for the largest historic downtown in Orange County. The latest project, which the City Council will review Feb. 5, proposes five lofts atop ground-level shops. A jumbo-size elevator would lift cars into holding spaces tucked inside the building.
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