Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOfficial Visits Bosnia Herzegovina
IN THE NEWS

Official Visits Bosnia Herzegovina

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gathered on the same American C-141 aircraft bound for a meeting with President Clinton on Saturday were mortal enemies, victims of the Bosnian war and its survivors. Alija Izetbegovic, the Muslim president of Bosnia-Herzegovina, was accompanied by members of his government, including Foreign Minister Muhamed Sacirbey. Not far from Izetbegovic sat the Serbian mayors of two Bosnian Serb bastions, Banja Luka in the north and Ilidza, a suburb of Sarajevo.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton flies into this war-scarred capital today, joining leaders from more than 30 other nations to launch an ambitious plan to lift Europe's poor and politically troubled southeastern region into the continent's mainstream. The project, initially the brainchild of German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer, is known as the Balkan "stability pact."
Advertisement
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ignoring an apparent assassination attempt, Pope John Paul II traveled Saturday to this predominantly Muslim city, a symbol of a war in which religion became the pretext for fratricide and a capital where ethnic nationalism continues to divide. Just hours before the pope arrived in Sarajevo, police discovered a powerful batch of explosives along the route the pontiff's motorcade was scheduled to take.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ignoring an apparent assassination attempt, Pope John Paul II traveled Saturday to this predominantly Muslim city, a symbol of a war in which religion became the pretext for fratricide and a capital where ethnic nationalism continues to divide. Just hours before the pope arrived in Sarajevo, police discovered a powerful batch of explosives along the route the pontiff's motorcade was scheduled to take.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | Reuters
President Clinton is considering a visit to Bosnia-Herzegovina to meet U.S. troops there in late January, but only if it is appropriate, White House officials said Friday. They said a decision on a trip had not yet been made and that one would wait for a report from Defense Secretary William J. Perry. Perry is scheduled to visit Bosnia on Wednesday to meet American troops who are among a 60,000-member NATO force massing there to implement a Bosnian peace accord signed earlier this month.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | From Reuters
U.N. officers warned Monday that Pope John Paul II's planned visit to Sarajevo posed grave security risks. "The Pope's life will be at risk and the lives of those around him will be at risk as well," said a U.N. official who asked not to be named. The 74-year-old pontiff is due to travel to the capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina on Thursday, but the Vatican has indicated the trip still may be canceled because of security concerns.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | From Associated Press
Croatia's president made his first wartime visit to the Bosnian capital Tuesday to lend support to the Muslim-Croatian alliance. "I am convinced that we are at the end of the tragedy that this city, and the Muslim nation and Croatian nation with it, had to live through," President Franjo Tudjman said as he formally opened a new Croatian Embassy. Bosnia's Croats and the Muslim-led government initially fought together against Bosnian Serbs when war began in April, 1992.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
On the eve of her front-line visit to Bosnia, Hillary Rodham Clinton comforted anxious military families Sunday, declaring U.S. troops "so ready, so focused" for their dangerous peacekeeping mission. Accompanied by her daughter, Chelsea, the first lady opened an eight-day tour of Europe that promises a mix of diplomacy, politics and sightseeing. It began emotionally: At stop after stop, the first lady met with wives, husbands, children and friends of soldiers deployed in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
September 7, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It started with papal resolve to carry an offering of peace and reconciliation to a city racked by war. But the gesture quickly lapsed into a nasty game of brinkmanship, and on Tuesday it was Pope John Paul II who blinked. "We will be with you," the Pope promised the people of tortured Sarajevo earlier this year. "We will be ever more with you." But only in spirit. A prayed-for one-day papal visit to the battle-scarred Bosnian capital scheduled for Thursday died aborning Tuesday: too dangerous.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | From Reuters
Pope John Paul II said Saturday that he hopes to go ahead this week with a planned visit to Sarajevo, only hours after Bosnian Serbs said they could not guarantee his safety. "I truly hope, if there are sufficient guarantees for the security of the local population, to be able to go to that city which has been battered--and which is so dear to me--as a pilgrim of peace," said the pontiff, 74, who plans to arrive in Sarajevo on Thursday.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
On the eve of her front-line visit to Bosnia, Hillary Rodham Clinton comforted anxious military families Sunday, declaring U.S. troops "so ready, so focused" for their dangerous peacekeeping mission. Accompanied by her daughter, Chelsea, the first lady opened an eight-day tour of Europe that promises a mix of diplomacy, politics and sightseeing. It began emotionally: At stop after stop, the first lady met with wives, husbands, children and friends of soldiers deployed in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a backdrop of battle-ready attack helicopters and armored vehicles, President Clinton on Saturday praised American forces in Bosnia as "warriors for peace" and commiserated with them about the local weather conditions, calling them "veterans of the Tuzla mud."
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gathered on the same American C-141 aircraft bound for a meeting with President Clinton on Saturday were mortal enemies, victims of the Bosnian war and its survivors. Alija Izetbegovic, the Muslim president of Bosnia-Herzegovina, was accompanied by members of his government, including Foreign Minister Muhamed Sacirbey. Not far from Izetbegovic sat the Serbian mayors of two Bosnian Serb bastions, Banja Luka in the north and Ilidza, a suburb of Sarajevo.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | Reuters
President Clinton is considering a visit to Bosnia-Herzegovina to meet U.S. troops there in late January, but only if it is appropriate, White House officials said Friday. They said a decision on a trip had not yet been made and that one would wait for a report from Defense Secretary William J. Perry. Perry is scheduled to visit Bosnia on Wednesday to meet American troops who are among a 60,000-member NATO force massing there to implement a Bosnian peace accord signed earlier this month.
NEWS
September 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Nations denied that it told Pope John Paul II to cancel his visit to Sarajevo. The Pope's visit to the capital, planned for today, was called off after Bosnian Serbs refused to guarantee his safety and fired mortars around the city. Bosnia's Muslim leaders accused U.N. officials of recommending that the visit be put off, but the U.N. Protection Force said it had merely warned the Vatican of the risks.
NEWS
September 7, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It started with papal resolve to carry an offering of peace and reconciliation to a city racked by war. But the gesture quickly lapsed into a nasty game of brinkmanship, and on Tuesday it was Pope John Paul II who blinked. "We will be with you," the Pope promised the people of tortured Sarajevo earlier this year. "We will be ever more with you." But only in spirit. A prayed-for one-day papal visit to the battle-scarred Bosnian capital scheduled for Thursday died aborning Tuesday: too dangerous.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton flies into this war-scarred capital today, joining leaders from more than 30 other nations to launch an ambitious plan to lift Europe's poor and politically troubled southeastern region into the continent's mainstream. The project, initially the brainchild of German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer, is known as the Balkan "stability pact."
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a backdrop of battle-ready attack helicopters and armored vehicles, President Clinton on Saturday praised American forces in Bosnia as "warriors for peace" and commiserated with them about the local weather conditions, calling them "veterans of the Tuzla mud."
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | From Reuters
U.N. officers warned Monday that Pope John Paul II's planned visit to Sarajevo posed grave security risks. "The Pope's life will be at risk and the lives of those around him will be at risk as well," said a U.N. official who asked not to be named. The 74-year-old pontiff is due to travel to the capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina on Thursday, but the Vatican has indicated the trip still may be canceled because of security concerns.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | From Reuters
Pope John Paul II said Saturday that he hopes to go ahead this week with a planned visit to Sarajevo, only hours after Bosnian Serbs said they could not guarantee his safety. "I truly hope, if there are sufficient guarantees for the security of the local population, to be able to go to that city which has been battered--and which is so dear to me--as a pilgrim of peace," said the pontiff, 74, who plans to arrive in Sarajevo on Thursday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|