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Offspring Music Group

BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Orange County punk band Offspring is expected to sign a four-album, multimillion-dollar contract this week with Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment. The deal, which has been in the works since February, could be announced as early as Friday, although some financial details are still unresolved.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1995 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The last thing a band that's been accused of plagiarism wants to do is hear its song on the radio along with the one it allegedly copied . . . unless that band is the Offspring. The Orange County punk group appeared in the studio at KROQ-FM last week and played not one but two records it's been accused of copping for its hit song "Come Out and Play," from the 4-million-selling album "Smash."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The punk band Face to Face is letting bygones be bygones after a bizarre episode at the recent Board in Orange County festival, where Face to Face's singer was knocked off the concert stage by Jason McLean, whose singsong speaking voice intones the "you gotta keep 'em separated" catch phrase on Offspring's hit, "Come Out and Play."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A platinum band makes a lovely 15th anniversary present. That's the gift the Offspring have bestowed on the Orange County punk-alternative scene. The musical movement that began shouting to the world in 1979, when the Crowd became the first Orange County punk band to get airplay on KROQ, has just produced its first million-selling album. If you don't count Nirvana as a punk band, the Offspring's prophetically titled "Smash" may end up the biggest-selling album in punk-rock history.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The national success of the Offspring, whose "Smash" album has lived up to its name by cracking the Top 20 on the Billboard pop chart, represents a new breakthrough for Orange County's grass-roots rock scene. Unfortunately, back on the home front it's business as usual: Another promising alternative-music venue on the chronically anemic club scene is about to fold.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As 1994 began, the Offspring were just another obscure punk band hoping they could make it to the next gig without a mechanical breakdown. The bus motor would seize up on the road to Bakersfield. The transmission would give out en route to Arizona. When they finally got the engine rebuilt, the four band members drove across country on a winter tour, shivering all the way because they couldn't get the heater to work. "It was awful, but it would cost too much to fix it," said drummer Ron Welty.
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