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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's now conventional wisdom that television coverage of Oklahoma University law professor Anita Hill--appearing powerless when verbally harassed by male U.S. Senators--was the catalyst for this political season's powerful surge of female candidates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg
A spate of convicts has earned freedom following "Frontline" films by Ofra Bikel that raised public awareness about their plights. "When injustices in the system receive this kind of attention, the public will respond," attorney Mark Montgomery said in February, when his client, 21-year-old Terence Garner, was released from a North Carolina prison and granted a new trial less than a month after Bikel's "An Ordinary Crime" offered strong evidence of...
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg
A spate of convicts has earned freedom following "Frontline" films by Ofra Bikel that raised public awareness about their plights. "When injustices in the system receive this kind of attention, the public will respond," attorney Mark Montgomery said in February, when his client, 21-year-old Terence Garner, was released from a North Carolina prison and granted a new trial less than a month after Bikel's "An Ordinary Crime" offered strong evidence of...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It's now conventional wisdom that television coverage of Oklahoma University law professor Anita Hill--appearing powerless when verbally harassed by male U.S. Senators--was the catalyst for this political season's powerful surge of female candidates.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wheels of justice turn slowly, and occasionally they can run right over you. Tonight's edition of "Frontline" focuses on a man it claims bears the tread marks to prove it. Terence Garner sits in a North Carolina prison cell today facing at least 30 more years of confinement for a 1997 robbery and shooting that many familiar with the case say he did not commit. Now, that being said, most people are aware that prisons have no shortage of inmates who make the same claim.
NEWS
May 1, 2003 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Clyde Charles spent 18 years in a Louisiana prison before DNA testing finally cleared him of rape. The day he walked free, he was greeted by euphoric relatives and attorneys, along with a media horde that captured the scene for the evening news. Hopes for his future ran high. "It was such a joyous moment," says lawyer Barry Scheck of the Innocence Project, which has freed scores of wrongly convicted prisoners. "Everybody was all out there, 'We're going to help Clyde!'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The puzzling, paranoid, nightmarish phenomenon that was the McMartin child abuse trial is repeating itself in the quiet town of Edenton, N.C. And no, this is not a movie-of-the-week. In the meticulous, gut-churning two-hour report, "Innocence Lost," that producer Ofra Bikel has compiled for "Frontline" (tonight at 9 p.m., Channels 28 and 15; 10 p.m. on Channel 50), the loaded word McMartin is never mentioned.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's unfortunate that psychiatrists and so-called experts in MPDs (multiple personality disorders) Drs. Bennett Braun and Roberta Sachs refused to speak on the record to "Frontline" producers Ofra Bikel and Rachel Dretzin for their report "The Search for Satan." They have a lot to answer for. Bikel has long been "Frontline's" chief investigator of exotic psychiatric therapies and their controversial and sometimes damaging effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2001
Re Howard Rosenberg's "Elian: Through the Looking Glass" (Feb. 5): One point Rosenberg seems to miss completely is that the media created the feeding frenzy in the first place around the Miami relatives who were probably just trying to do what they thought was best for their traumatized nephew. But worse still is the fact that he uncritically buys into all or many of the mischaracterizations of Elian's U.S. relatives and the Cuban American community that the media here cooked up to create a simplistic situation that the public could more easily swallow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
VCR alert! Overlapping each other tonight are two highly worthy programs that view crime from dramatically different perspectives. One is ABC's returning "NYPD Blue." The other is a stunning "Front-line" documentary about men convicted of murder and other serious crimes being later exonerated by DNA evidence. Either that or being forced to remain in prison because of states refusing to accept this scientific data that appears to exclude the convicted inmates from involvement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the four grueling, tension-filled hours of producer Ofra Bikel's "Innocence Lost: The Verdict" unfold, it may or may not change your opinions about child abuse cases, but it almost certainly will make you very, very uneasy. Not about child abusers. The massive three-years-and-counting multiple trials involving Bob and Betsy Kelly and their assistants who ran the Edenton, N.C.-based child-care center, Little Rascals, raise far more questions than they answer about alleged abuses.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the stories of battered women and AIDS sufferers can be made into compelling Hollywood dramas that propel some people to action, couldn't the same expectation be had for those involving the plight of starving children in Somalia or prisoners in Serbian-run concentration camps? That's what the Geneva-based United Nations commissioner for refugees hopes. The agency has taken the unprecedented step of asking a select number of Writers Guild of America members to travel under U.N.
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