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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
After stalling for two months, the Los Angeles City Council bowed Tuesday to public pressure and Mayor Tom Bradley's wishes to kill the Lancer trash-to-energy incinerator once proposed for a plot of land near the Memorial Coliseum in the South-Central area. While the action Tuesday spells an official end to the $235-million Lancer project, it leaves open the possibility that the city might someday--perhaps sooner than later--burn its garbage rather than bury it in hillside canyons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
After stalling for two months, the Los Angeles City Council bowed Tuesday to public pressure and Mayor Tom Bradley's wishes to kill the Lancer trash-to-energy incinerator once proposed for a plot of land near the Memorial Coliseum in the South-Central area. While the action Tuesday spells an official end to the $235-million Lancer project, it leaves open the possibility that the city might someday--perhaps sooner than later--burn its garbage rather than bury it in hillside canyons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1986
Bowing to complaints that the system was tainted, Los Angeles city officials Thursday agreed to reopen the bidding between two firms competing for a lucrative 20-year contract to operate a $235-million trash-burning facility in South-Central Los Angeles. The action was taken after Signal Environmental Systems, one of the bidders, protested that confidential papers it filed with the city were obtained by its rival, Ogden-Martin Corp. No evidence of impropriety was found, a city spokesman said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1986 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Casting a political life jacket to one of its members, the Los Angeles City Council on Friday ordered the search to begin for Westside and San Fernando Valley sites for huge trash-burning plants--a move designed to deflect some of the criticism veteran Councilman Gilbert Lindsay has taken for the decision to place the first such plant in his Central City district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1986 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Rejecting the recommendation of its staff, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday added two local, politically well-connected law firms--including one employing a councilman's son--to a team of lawyers to negotiate terms of the city's proposed $235-million trash-burning plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1986 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
The decision Monday was low-key and non-binding and sounded like another bit of Los Angeles City Hall routine. Senior city department officials were recommending that Ogden-Martin Corp. of New Jersey be hired to build a city trash-burning plant. In fact, however, the recommendation was the final step in a grueling process intended to insulate the richest city contract in years from the political byplay that colors many City Council decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1986 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles City Council Wednesday selected a New Jersey company to build and run a huge trash-burning facility in a poor section of South-Central Los Angeles, but warned that fears about toxic dioxin emissions could block final approval and threaten a city policy to also burn trash in more affluent areas. Known as the Los Angeles City Energy Recovery (Lancer) project, the proposed plant is the first stage in a plan to gradually burn most of the city's trash rather than bury it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
The huge trash incinerator that many city officials want to build in South-Central Los Angeles poses less risk to residents--though not necessarily to politicians--than any other such facility in the country, according to a scientific evaluation released Wednesday. The number of estimated potential cancer cases was so far below other studies, however, that the results were greeted with skepticism as soon as they were released.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
A few miles east of downtown Los Angeles, the state's only working waste-to-energy garbage incinerator puffs away as the lone exception to that rarest of California occurrences--a nationwide trend that refuses to catch on here. The City of Commerce incinerator is small as they go, burning 300 tons of trash a day just off the Santa Ana Freeway.
NEWS
March 9, 1986 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
David Sokol prefers mid-town Manhattan, where he runs Ogden-Martin Corp. from an office high above Park Avenue. But to do business in Los Angeles, he has learned, it helps to make respectful visits in City Hall and buy tickets to fund-raising events held by key members of the City Council. And Sokol, the firm's president, dearly wants to do business here.
NEWS
March 9, 1986 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
In his job with the City of Los Angeles, Michael Miller has taken his nose to Japan and toured the East Coast from New England to Florida. At every stop he sniffed the local garbage. Few envy Miller. His task is to sell a skeptical public on the latest idea in garbage disposal, a concept so old it is new again--burning the foul stuff instead of burying it in the ground.
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