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March 2, 2009 | Sara Wolf
Speaking of his latest work for Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, "Max," Ohad Naharin has poetically referenced the universality of gesture and the essence of being -- the usual sort of statements made about the art of dance that don't really say much of anything. In performance at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday evening, the piece was -- gratifyingly -- at once more particular and abstruse, relying as it did on a lexicon of physical gestures that, despite their specificity, added up to gibberish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Jean Lenihan
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater has long bedecked its ensemble in suits (the jazz crowd in "For Bird - With Love") and took a recent turn with androgynous menswear (Camille A. Brown's "The Evolution of a Secured Feminine"). Yet in previous incarnations, these fitted jackets and rakish hats have been of a jazzy, romantic stripe, spurring angled moves and scurrying feet. One imagines a crafty urban vernacular born from fast pedestrians, tight corridors and dizzying heights. Those speedy, showy creatures of past Ailey seasons bore no resemblance to the crumpled, besuited unisex ensemble that came to life Wednesday night at the Music Center premiere of "Minus 16" (1999)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | Valerie Gladstone
Twenty dancers form a semicircle as Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin's recorded voice speaks the first words of the traditional Passover song "Echad Mi Yodea" (Who Knows One), marking the beginning of his work by that name. They sit down, lean forward and bow toward the floor. The Israeli rock group Tractor's Revenge pumps up the tempo with its version of the song. Thrusting out their chests, the dancers tilt backward in their chairs and spread their arms wide, wildly shaking their heads as if possessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | Valerie Gladstone
Twenty dancers form a semicircle as Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin's recorded voice speaks the first words of the traditional Passover song "Echad Mi Yodea" (Who Knows One), marking the beginning of his work by that name. They sit down, lean forward and bow toward the floor. The Israeli rock group Tractor's Revenge pumps up the tempo with its version of the song. Thrusting out their chests, the dancers tilt backward in their chairs and spread their arms wide, wildly shaking their heads as if possessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't ask Batsheva Dance Company director Ohad Naharin to scour his memory about his early days with the company he took over almost a decade ago. "I have the memory of a dead cat," Naharin said, speaking from Seattle, where the company was dancing ahead of its date tonight at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. "It might be good exercise to reconstruct the history of the time since I came to Batsheva. But it's an ongoing process. I've learned a lot about my own work since then."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Set in capital letters, "NOTHING IS PERMANENT" formed the central statement in the four-line biography of Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin in the program booklet at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday. Don't believe it: Whenever you see Naharin choreography in Southern California, it's always, inevitably, the same greatest-hits jumble. Like it or not, you can count on that kind of permanence.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2006 | Susan Josephs, Special to The Times
Three years ago, Ohad Naharin believed he "needed a change," so he stepped down as artistic director of the internationally acclaimed, Tel Aviv-based Batsheva Dance Company. "It was a decision that meant I was really stopping, that I wasn't coming back," he recalls. It was also a decision that lasted about a year and a half. These days, Naharin is once more at the helm of Batsheva, having returned last year to a job he first assumed in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Jean Lenihan
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater has long bedecked its ensemble in suits (the jazz crowd in "For Bird - With Love") and took a recent turn with androgynous menswear (Camille A. Brown's "The Evolution of a Secured Feminine"). Yet in previous incarnations, these fitted jackets and rakish hats have been of a jazzy, romantic stripe, spurring angled moves and scurrying feet. One imagines a crafty urban vernacular born from fast pedestrians, tight corridors and dizzying heights. Those speedy, showy creatures of past Ailey seasons bore no resemblance to the crumpled, besuited unisex ensemble that came to life Wednesday night at the Music Center premiere of "Minus 16" (1999)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2002
Mari Kajiwara, 50, a leading modern dancer with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the Ohad Naharin Dance Company and the Batsheva Dance Company of Israel, died of cancer Dec. 25 in Tel Aviv. Born in New York City, Kajiwara attended its High School of Performing Arts and City College and performed successively with the Glen Tetley and Norman Walker dance companies before joining Ailey's troupe in 1970.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David Ng
Daniel Day-Lewis will soon have a new role to obsessively inhabit -- recipient of an honorary doctoral degree from the Juilliard School in New York. The arts school said it also would bestow commencement honors this year on opera singer Dawn Upshaw, pianist Alfred Brendel, choreographer Ohad Naharin and jazz musician Sonny Rollins. In addition, Juilliard said it would include writer Harriet Heyman and technology venture capitalist Michael Moritz among the honorees at its commencement ceremony on May 24 at Alice Tully Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2009 | Sara Wolf
Speaking of his latest work for Israel's Batsheva Dance Company, "Max," Ohad Naharin has poetically referenced the universality of gesture and the essence of being -- the usual sort of statements made about the art of dance that don't really say much of anything. In performance at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday evening, the piece was -- gratifyingly -- at once more particular and abstruse, relying as it did on a lexicon of physical gestures that, despite their specificity, added up to gibberish.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2006 | Susan Josephs, Special to The Times
Three years ago, Ohad Naharin believed he "needed a change," so he stepped down as artistic director of the internationally acclaimed, Tel Aviv-based Batsheva Dance Company. "It was a decision that meant I was really stopping, that I wasn't coming back," he recalls. It was also a decision that lasted about a year and a half. These days, Naharin is once more at the helm of Batsheva, having returned last year to a job he first assumed in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Set in capital letters, "NOTHING IS PERMANENT" formed the central statement in the four-line biography of Israeli choreographer Ohad Naharin in the program booklet at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday. Don't believe it: Whenever you see Naharin choreography in Southern California, it's always, inevitably, the same greatest-hits jumble. Like it or not, you can count on that kind of permanence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1998 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't ask Batsheva Dance Company director Ohad Naharin to scour his memory about his early days with the company he took over almost a decade ago. "I have the memory of a dead cat," Naharin said, speaking from Seattle, where the company was dancing ahead of its date tonight at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. "It might be good exercise to reconstruct the history of the time since I came to Batsheva. But it's an ongoing process. I've learned a lot about my own work since then."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Modern dance is modern again. Israeli choreographer and company leader Ohad Naharin has developed a millennial training system for his Batsheva Dance Company that frees dancers to move any which way with unprecedented control. He calls that system Gaga, and it's rooted in unblocking the body, releasing untapped reserves of agility and metaphysical connection.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1998 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Batsheva Dance Company, the Tel Aviv-based troupe that took the name of one of its 1964 founders (Baroness Batsheva de Rothchild) and once used the technique of the other (Martha Graham), now has a different guiding light that was seen Wednesday night at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Since 1990, artistic director and chief choreographer Ohad Naharin, a former Graham dancer himself, has brought his own sense of the austere and epic to Batsheva.
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