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SPORTS
January 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
A jockey and two horse owners are among five who have been banned from Beulah Park for 60 days for possible involvement in race fixing, according to a published report. The Columbus Dispatch reported in its Sunday editions that stewards at the suburban Columbus thoroughbred track had barred jockey James Robert Henson; Henson's agent, Charles Bright; owners Michael Bianchetti and Douglas Hobson, and trainer Daniel A. Frasher.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001
Ed Weaver, 90, a former Ohio State athletic director who greatly expanded the school's athletic program, died Wednesday at Ohio State University Medical Center. A native of Marysville, Ohio, and an Ohio State graduate, Weaver became the school's third athletic director in 1970 after working in university finance, alumni relations and the athletic department. He stepped down in May 1977 after more than 30 years with the school.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2001
Ed Weaver, 90, a former Ohio State athletic director who greatly expanded the school's athletic program, died Wednesday at Ohio State University Medical Center. A native of Marysville, Ohio, and an Ohio State graduate, Weaver became the school's third athletic director in 1970 after working in university finance, alumni relations and the athletic department. He stepped down in May 1977 after more than 30 years with the school.
SPORTS
January 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
A jockey and two horse owners are among five who have been banned from Beulah Park for 60 days for possible involvement in race fixing, according to a published report. The Columbus Dispatch reported in its Sunday editions that stewards at the suburban Columbus thoroughbred track had barred jockey James Robert Henson; Henson's agent, Charles Bright; owners Michael Bianchetti and Douglas Hobson, and trainer Daniel A. Frasher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In business, they were partners, and in the courtroom they sat side by side--accused of killing a man to use his corpse in a $1.5-million life insurance scam. But on Wednesday, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury could not decide if John Barrett Hawkins--who made off with most of the money--deserved equal blame. They convicted his business partner, Melvin Eugene Hanson, of murder, but deadlocked over whether Hawkins was guilty of the same crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In business, they were partners, and in the courtroom they sat side-by-side, both accused of killing a man to use his corpse in a $1.5-million life insurance scam. But on Wednesday, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury could not decide if John Barrett Hawkins--who made off with most of the money--deserved equal blame. They convicted his partner, Melvin Eugene Hanson, of murder, but deadlocked over whether Hawkins was guilty of the same crime.
SPORTS
February 8, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Bruce Fleisher began his Senior PGA career impressively, winning the season-opening Royal Caribbean Classic by two strokes Sunday at Key Biscayne, Fla. The victory made Fleisher the fifth player to win in his senior-tour debut, joining Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player and George Archer. "I can't express what I'm feeling right now," Fleisher said after winning in front of many friends and family from his hometown of Miami.
SPORTS
May 10, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Torey Lovullo was sitting on the bench Sunday afternoon, frantic over his car that he had left stranded on Interstate 5, when he looked up and winced in anguish. Angel second baseman Damion Easley had just been hit in the left hand by Oakland pitcher Shawn Hillegas' pitch in the third inning, and now, of all days, Lovullo was being called into the game. "I was in a state of panic, anyway," Lovullo said, "and when that happened, I said, 'This just isn't my day.'
SPORTS
September 3, 1985 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
You'd think the football would be better here, what with a killer booster club and the institution's record of finding jobs for all its grads. Who wouldn't want to play the game here? Some of the players get paid $450 a month, up-front as can be. Also, clothes are free and they're pretty nice. Hey, NCAA! Are you listening? Of course, there is a downside to playing for the U.S. Naval Academy, and we're not talking about the mandatory study period--7:30-11 p.m.--either.
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