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September 9, 2011
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
South Bay Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi on Friday announced a bill designed to take the financial heat off Hermosa Beach voters who are being asked to decide whether to allow oil drilling in their city for the first time in more than 80 years. The legislation would allow the city to take out a no-interest loan from the state to help pay off a $17.5-million penalty the city would face if voters in the beach town reject an oil drilling proposal. The assemblyman said he wanted Hermosa Beach residents to vote "without the gun of this financial penalty to their head.
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OPINION
July 11, 2012
Re "Shell Alaska vessel hinders drilling," July 8 Personally, I'm against any drilling in the Arctic. Even if no oil is spilled during Shell's operations this summer, its fleet will release tons of industrial pollutants in the air every year, which would add to the levels of toxic chemicals and acid in the Arctic waters. Environmental and wildlife concerns aside, though, it still doesn't seem reasonable to expend so much costly effort on oil, a finite resource. If making money is a concern, Shell should figure out a way to fill the void when oil runs out. Helen Yi Rancho Cucamonga ALSO: Letters: One ID, one vote Letters: Licensing pet groomers Letters: Contrasting George and Mitt Romney
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - A proposal to charge a tax on oil pumped from the ground in California was approved Thursday by a state Senate panel on grounds that it would help fund higher education in the state. The Senate Education Committee voted, 5-2, to advance the bill that would levy a 9.5% tax to raise $2 billion annually to be divided among state universities and colleges, state parks and human service programs. “California is the only major oil producer in the world that does not collect taxes on oil production,” Sen. Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa)
NATIONAL
June 17, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Here on the open ocean, 12 miles from ground zero of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the gulf is hovering between life and death. The large strands of sargassum seaweed atop the ocean are normally noisy with birds and thick with crustaceans, small fish and sea turtles. But now this is a silent panorama, heavy with the smell of oil. There are no birds. The seaweed is soaked in rust-colored crude and chemical dispersant. It is devoid of life except for the occasional juvenile sea turtle, speckled with oil and clinging to the only habitat it knows.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
A team of top federal prosecutors and investigators has taken the first steps toward a formal criminal investigation into oil giant BP's actions before and after the drilling rig disaster off Louisiana. The investigators, who have been quietly gathering evidence in Louisiana over the last three weeks, are focusing on whether BP skirted federal safety regulations and misled the U.S. government by saying it could quickly clean up an environmental accident. The team has met with U.S. attorneys and state officials in the Gulf Coast region and has sent letters to executives of BP and Transocean Ltd., the drilling rig owner, warning them against destroying documents or other internal records.
OPINION
August 7, 2010
What is a barrel of oil worth? Generally, the answer depends on a number of factors, including the mood of the commodities markets, the grade of the oil and demand at the gas pump. The basic assumption, however, is that the oil has a value because it eventually will be available for use. But in a historic move, Ecuador is asking the world to put a dollar figure on oil that will not be used — oil it intends to protect from excavation. On Tuesday, Ecuador and the United Nations Development Programme began soliciting donations for a trust fund that would remunerate the country if it forgoes drilling in a pristine portion of its Amazon rain forest for 10 years.
NEWS
April 18, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Question: I find that some garages, when doing an oil and filter change, will put in as much as one full quart of oil over the full mark on my dip stick. They say it will not harm the engine, but my automotive owner's manual says in big letters: "Don't Overfill." What harm can it do?--J.M.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Forget about all the butter we Americans are supposed to be consuming, I'm deep into olive oil practically every meal, lavishing a slab of grilled country bread with the intensely fruity Tuscan oil and sopping up every bit of the remains on my plate. This is from my annual shipment of olio nuovo (new oil) from the Rare Wine Co. in Sonoma. The color is an iridescent jade-chartreuse,  gorgeous to behold. This is olive oil more as food than condiment. I float a thread on winter minestrone or pasta fagioli, eat halved avocados with a drizzle of the oil, dip artichoke leaves in a little dish of olio nuovo . I get my fix every year from the Rare Wine Co., which has been bringing in a selection of new oils from Tuscany for almost 20 years now. This year, after tasting the new oils in November, Rare Wine founder Mannie Berk chose oils from half a dozen wine estates in Tuscany.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Veronica Rocha
Glendale police uncovered the second hash-oil operation in as many weeks Tuesday night -- the same night a similar lab exploded at a home in Malibu, injuring one person. Police arrested a man and a woman in connection with the Glendale operation, which was discovered inside a home in the 1200 block of East Lexington Drive during a probation compliance check, police Sgt. Luis Pasache said. "It puts the community at risk," he said, adding that the home is between two apartment buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
An oil operation that sent noxious fumes into a South Los Angeles neighborhood has agreed to spend about $700,000 on upgrades to prevent future hazardous emissions, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday. The settlement capped a four-month investigation by the EPA into Allenco Energy Inc. that was prompted by hundreds of complaints of chemical odors, respiratory ailments, nosebleeds and other health problems in the University Park community, about a half-mile north of USC. "The company must notify the EPA that they have completed the improvements at least 15 days before reopening," said Jared Blumenfeld, the EPA's regional administrator for the Pacific Southwest.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Shan Li
The oil and gas industry creates about 49,000 jobs in Los Angeles County and billions of tax revenue in California. That's according to a new report conducted by the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. and commissioned by the trade group Western States Petroleum Assn., which takes a look at the role of oil and gas on the Golden State economy in 2012. In the county of Los Angeles, more than 17,000 people are employed in oil and gas extraction, while an additional 12,000 work at gas stations, the report said.
WORLD
April 21, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The United Nations on Monday condemned ethnic killings by South Sudan rebels that left hundreds of people dead last week after the fall of an oil town to the opposition forces. The world body said the killings took place in Bentiu, the hub of the country's main oil producing region in the north.  U.N. spokesman Joe Contreras said in a statement that some members of the rebel Sudan Peoples Liberation Movement in Opposition broadcast hate messages on radio after taking control of Bentiu, urging certain ethnic groups to leave town.
OPINION
April 12, 2014
Re "A crude energy puzzle," April 7 Regarding all the happy talk about the oil trove trapped in the Monterey Shale formation, perhaps there really are billions of barrels in recoverable fossil fuel underneath California. But if we burn the stuff, where exactly should we put the carbon dioxide? Last I heard, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide was greater than 400 parts per million. This is a big science experiment because that is an increase from 270 parts per million before the widespread burning of fossil fuels began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Veronica Rocha
Glendale police uncovered the second hash-oil operation in as many weeks Tuesday night -- the same night a similar lab exploded at a home in Malibu, injuring one person. Police arrested a man and a woman in connection with the Glendale operation, which was discovered inside a home in the 1200 block of East Lexington Drive during a probation compliance check, police Sgt. Luis Pasache said. "It puts the community at risk," he said, adding that the home is between two apartment buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Jason Wells
A suspected drug lab at a home in Malibu caught fire and exploded Tuesday, injuring one person who had to be transported to the hospital via helicopter, authorities said. Firefighters responded to the home  in the 1200 block of Encinal Canyon Road shortly before 6:15 p.m. to find it fully engulfed in flames, according to the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Authorities later discovered the substance “honey oil” -- a type of marijuana oil -- at the residence, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Sgt. Fray Lupian told KTLA-TV . A 25-year-old man who was burned in the explosion and ensuing fire was airlifted to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to be treated for his injuries, authorities said.
NEWS
June 4, 2010 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A cap placed atop a gushing well on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico could allow BP officials to begin pumping oil to the surface later Friday, the Coast Guard admiral leading the response to the disaster said, but he warned that strong winds had sent oil surging to the Florida Panhandle and had split the disaster into several slicks that would strain the resources available to clean them up. "The scope of this thing is starting to extend to...
BUSINESS
December 15, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Many automobile owners are spending more than they need on motor oil, believing that it should be changed every 3,000 miles even though almost no manufacturer requires such an aggressive oil-change schedule. The long-held notion that the oil should be changed every 3,000 miles is so prevalent that California officials have launched a campaign to stop drivers from wasting millions of gallons of oil annually because they have their vehicles serviced too often. "Our survey data found that nearly half of California drivers are still changing their oil at 3,000 miles or even sooner," said Mark Oldfield, a spokesman for the California Department of Resources, Recycling and Recovery, which has launched the Check Your Number campaign to encourage drivers to go with the manufacturer's recommendations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Julie Cart
SHAFTER, Calif. - A bustling city is sprouting on five acres here, carved out of a vast almond grove. Tanker trucks and heavy equipment come and go, a row of office trailers runs the length of the site and an imposing 150-foot drilling rig illuminated by football-field-like lights rises over the trees. It's all been hustled into service to solve a tantalizing riddle: how to tap into the largest oil shale reservoir in the United States. Across the southern San Joaquin Valley, oil exploration sites have popped up in agricultural fields and on government land, driven by the hope that technological advances in oil extraction - primarily hydraulic fracturing and acidization - can help provide access to deep and lucrative oil reserves.
WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - It can take Moscow residents two hours in dense traffic to drive the first 10 miles on the highway to St. Petersburg, in the direction of their country cottages surrounded by lakes and birch groves. Then the road's real limitations become apparent. The potholed two-lane route connecting Russia's two largest cities has never been upgraded into a proper highway. Anyone who cares to drive its entire 440-mile length - mostly truckers - will need at least 12 hours. But 5,600 miles away, the government spent more than $1 billion on less than a mile of bridge connecting Vladivostok with Russky Island, previously inhabited only by a military garrison so isolated that four soldiers starved to death in 1992.
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