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NEWS
September 17, 1990 | Reuters
Leaders of the Palestinian revolt urged Baghdad's allies Sunday to cut off oil supplies to the West and send troops to back Iraq against Western forces in the Persian Gulf. The Unified National Leadership for the Uprising in the Occupied Territories made the appeal in a letter read to a conference of pro-Iraqi groups that opened here Saturday. The letter singled out Libya and Algeria.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | From Associated Press
China has agreed to buy Occidental Petroleum Corp.'s 25% stake in the An Tai Bao coal mine and pay off the mine's large foreign debt, a source close to the deal said Monday. The $750-million mine, the largest joint venture between China and a foreign company, was a pet project of the late Occidental Chairman Armand Hammer. Since his death last year at 92, the energy, chemicals and meatpacking concern has been getting out of many undertakings in which Hammer had a special interest.
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BUSINESS
June 10, 1991 | From Reuters
Algeria signed a five-year oil exploration contract Sunday with Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum Corp. Under the contract, the company will invest at least $32 million in prospecting for oil in 8,800 square miles near Hassi R'Mel in the Sahara, the Algerian state oil company Sonatrach said in a statement. The contract was signed while Algeria was under a state of siege after days of violent unrest involving Muslim fundamentalists demanding an Islamic state.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1991 | From Reuters
Algeria signed a five-year oil exploration contract Sunday with Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum Corp. Under the contract, the company will invest at least $32 million in prospecting for oil in 8,800 square miles near Hassi R'Mel in the Sahara, the Algerian state oil company Sonatrach said in a statement. The contract was signed while Algeria was under a state of siege after days of violent unrest involving Muslim fundamentalists demanding an Islamic state.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | From Associated Press
China has agreed to buy Occidental Petroleum Corp.'s 25% stake in the An Tai Bao coal mine and pay off the mine's large foreign debt, a source close to the deal said Monday. The $750-million mine, the largest joint venture between China and a foreign company, was a pet project of the late Occidental Chairman Armand Hammer. Since his death last year at 92, the energy, chemicals and meatpacking concern has been getting out of many undertakings in which Hammer had a special interest.
NEWS
January 31, 1985 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A badly divided Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, desperately trying to regain control of the market, announced a $1 reduction Wednesday in its basic price of $29 a barrel for oil. It was only the second time since its formation that the once-dominant cartel, which shocked the world in 1973 with the first of its series of enormous price increases, had been forced to cut its price.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1989 | From Reuters
OPEC ministers ended five days of talks today with a new output agreement, but the pact appeared flawed and did not look as if it would do much to push up prices. Algeria dissented and called it illegal. Kuwait voiced reservations, as it did with a previous agreement made in June and which it has openly flouted.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Crude oil futures fell in London on Friday amid expectations that a 5-day-old general strike in Nigeria over fuel prices may end this weekend. That would remove a threat that oil exports from Africa's largest producer may be disrupted. Strike leader Adams Oshiomhole, president of the Nigeria Labor Congress, met with Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo on Friday and will discuss a compromise with other union leaders today, Agence France-Presse reported.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | JOELLE STOLZ, Associated Press
Deep in the Algerian Sahara, huge circular fields of wheat, oats and barley are sprouting where the average annual rainfall is zero and where no one has put hoe to the soil for more than 12,000 years. Collapsing world oil prices have transformed parts of this desert where settlements once huddled only near oil rigs. Algeria's Sahara is converting from black gold to what officials call the Green Gold farm revolution.
OPINION
April 26, 2013 | By David Schenker
Security in the Forbidden City across the street from the Great Hall of the People was tight last month when Li Keqiang was installed as premier of China. But the uniformed guards weren't armed with automatic weapons. Instead, they were equipped with fire extinguishers to prevent would-be protesters from self-immolating. China these days is consumed with concerns about domestic stability. Notwithstanding this internal preoccupation, the Middle Kingdom's increasing appetite for Persian Gulf oil has sparked unprecedented Chinese interest in the Middle East.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | Reuters
Leaders of the Palestinian revolt urged Baghdad's allies Sunday to cut off oil supplies to the West and send troops to back Iraq against Western forces in the Persian Gulf. The Unified National Leadership for the Uprising in the Occupied Territories made the appeal in a letter read to a conference of pro-Iraqi groups that opened here Saturday. The letter singled out Libya and Algeria.
NEWS
January 31, 1985 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A badly divided Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, desperately trying to regain control of the market, announced a $1 reduction Wednesday in its basic price of $29 a barrel for oil. It was only the second time since its formation that the once-dominant cartel, which shocked the world in 1973 with the first of its series of enormous price increases, had been forced to cut its price.
NEWS
December 27, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elite French police commandos stormed a hijacked Air France jet at dusk Monday in Marseilles, killing four Muslim extremists who had shot to death three passengers and held 170 others hostage during a 54-hour siege that began across the Mediterranean in Algeria. During the raid, 25 people were injured: 13 passengers, nine members of the special police unit, the pilot and two other crew members.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic bid to check a gush of oil into Persian Gulf waters, U.S. warplanes swept into Kuwait and dropped precision glider bombs on two inland pipeline devices that direct crude toward the offshore Sea Island loading station, U.S. military officials said Sunday. They said it would take a full day to determine whether the nighttime raid by F-111 fighter-bombers on key parts of Kuwait's premier oil facility was successful. "I think that we've been successful, but only time will tell," Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of allied forces in the Persian Gulf, told reporters in Riyadh.
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