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BUSINESS
August 17, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Vietnam to Brazil, from Papua New Guinea to the Soviet Union, oil companies are leaving no stone unturned in the search for new, potentially long-lived oil reserves. The search for new oil fields gains urgency with the current Middle East crisis, which points up once again the world's reliance on oil from that politically unstable region. But is there enough new oil out there to effectively cut into the oil hegemony of the Persian Gulf states?
NEWS
January 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
From Wagga Wagga to Wee Waa, Andamooka to Lightning Ridge, towns in the vast Australian Outback depend on small planes to deliver the mail, dust crops, round up cattle, shuttle schoolchildren, bring in doctors and evacuate patients with medical emergencies. But 11 days ago, half the nation's light aircraft were grounded because of contaminated aviation fuel that thickens when it contacts copper and brass engine parts, raising the risk of clogged fuel lines and motors stalling in flight.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | MIKE PENNER
Midnight Oil is playing today's Olympic closing ceremony. That clinches a victory for the Olympic closing ceremony over the Olympic opening ceremony. Midnight Oil is Australia's greatest rock band. Not Men At Work or INXS or, egad, the Little River Band. Formed in Sydney more than 20 years ago, the Oils are great in the old-school sense, almost quaint now, that rock bands ought to be socially conscious and stand for something beyond record and T-shirt sales.
WORLD
June 2, 2008 | Ned Parker, Times Staff Writer
Australian troops ended their main combat mission in Iraq on Sunday, handing over their responsibilities in southern Iraq to U.S. forces. An estimated 550 Australian troops, who served in a training and backup role to Iraqi forces in the provinces of Dhi Qar and Muthanna, made the transfer in a ceremony at Camp Talil outside Nasiriya, said Capt. Chris Ford, a British military spokesman in southern Iraq. Meanwhile, U.S.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From Vietnam to Brazil, from Papua New Guinea to the Soviet Union, oil companies are leaving no stone unturned in the search for new, potentially long-lived oil reserves. The search for new oil fields gains urgency with the current Middle East crisis, which points up once again the world's reliance on oil from that politically unstable region. But is there enough new oil out there to effectively cut into the oil hegemony of the Persian Gulf states?
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
The emu, the bird of the hour, was conspicuously absent when exotic bird fanciers from throughout Southern California gathered in Pomona to exchange bird talk. "They're just now laying eggs," explained emu guru Charlaine Line. She and husband Richard have five breeding pairs at C R EMUS in Lucerne Valley. That's about $40,000 worth of emus on today's escalating market. A female lays 30 to 40 eggs a year, but it's the male's job to sit on them until they hatch--in about 60 days.
TRAVEL
March 10, 1991 | PAMELA MARGOSHES, Margoshes is a Washington, D.C.-based free-lance writer who has lived in the Philippines, Hong Kong and Australia.
My husband and I had been warned extensively about going to Suva, the steamy Fijian capital. One travel agent told me, "Suva is really sleazy now. It's gone completely downhill since the coup (three years ago). Why don't you go to Vanuatu instead." Tourists generally head right for Fiji's posh resorts, either on the west coast of Viti Levu (the main island, on which Suva is also located) or for what's called the Coral Coast, on the southwest side of Viti Levu.
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