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NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
CARRIZO SPRINGS, Texas - Just a few years ago this was a sleepy town of 5,600, and people eked out a living from the land. They farmed, worked ranches and leased their property to hunters to make a few dollars. Now, an oil and gas boom is transforming the economy of south Texas, turning Carrizo Springs into a busy city of at least 40,000. Texas oil companies, tapping a vast formation called the Eagle Ford shale, have nearly doubled oil production over the last two years and by next year are expected to produce 4 million barrels a day. That would catapult Texas ahead of Iran, Iraq and the United Arab Emirates to become the fifth-biggest oil producer in the world.
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BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
With America's new oil boom forcing more and more crude onto long trains to make up for inadequate pipeline capacity, Warren Buffett's BNSF has opened bids to buy 5,000 safer transport cars. The move follows a series of high-profile rail accidents and spills, including a July derailment that killed 47 in Lac-Megantic, Quebec. Another rail oil tank car incident in February dumped 4,500 gallons of crude in Pennsylvania. Bids will be put out to several tank car manufacturers, according to Roxanne Butler, a spokeswoman for BNSF.
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NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Federal scientists have developed a system that could help prevent some contamination of wetlands and groundwater from oil development in the booming Williston Basin in Montana and North Dakota, according to a new study. Along with oil extracted from deep underground in the Williston Basin comes naturally occurring water called brine that is 10 times more saline than seawater and is dumped into reserve pits. Brine can contaminate local water sources through leaching from the pits, pipeline spills or accidents.  At many area oil wells, 10 barrels of brine are produced for every barrel of oil, making brine disposal a significant issue as Williston Basin oil extraction flourishes.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
CARRIZO SPRINGS, Texas - Just a few years ago this was a sleepy town of 5,600, and people eked out a living from the land. They farmed, worked ranches and leased their property to hunters to make a few dollars. Now, an oil and gas boom is transforming the economy of south Texas, turning Carrizo Springs into a busy city of at least 40,000. Texas oil companies, tapping a vast formation called the Eagle Ford shale, have nearly doubled oil production over the last two years and by next year are expected to produce 4 million barrels a day. That would catapult Texas ahead of Iran, Iraq and the United Arab Emirates to become the fifth-biggest oil producer in the world.
FOOD
February 9, 2013 | By David Karp
As part of a great California olive oil boom, now at least a dozen olive oil vendors are selling at local farmers markets, up from only a couple a decade ago. Most offer a good product, but there are few who, like Michael O'Brien of Paso Gold , provide local, fresh, high-quality, certified organic oil, sold by the farmer himself in the agricultural section of the market. The combination of new varieties from Europe, high-density systems and mechanized harvest led to a surge in plantings of olives for oil, from a few hundred acres two decades ago to about 30,000 today, said Paul Vossen , a University of California farm advisor.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - About sundown one Sunday in September, North Dakota farmer Steven Jensen noticed that his combine was running over wet, squishy earth in a wheat field he was harvesting. When he took a closer look, he saw that oil had coated the wheels and that it was bubbling up about 6 inches high in spots. That was Sept. 29; Jensen contacted authorities immediately. At least 20,600 barrels of oil leaked onto the Jensens' land from a pipeline owned by Tesoro Logistics, one of the largest land-based spills in recent history.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska - It was the down slope of August, and in the icy winds and freezing rain that masquerade as summer on the Arctic coast, Shell Alaska had to move its community barbecue indoors to the school gym. Billed as the oil company's thank-you to the Iñupiat Eskimo village that is about to become a base for offshore drilling operations, the event featured free hamburgers, beans and something rarely seen up in the Far North - plates heaped...
NATIONAL
November 2, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON - On a stretch of ranchland nestled in the North Dakota Badlands, under dark, star-filled night skies, serene landscape and solitude, Theodore Roosevelt formed his strong conservationist ideals more than a century ago. But the night skies around the former president's Elkhorn Ranch, referred to as the "cradle of conservation" by environmentalists and historians, now glow orange. From some of the highest points in what is now Theodore Roosevelt National Park, dozens of natural gas flares are visible not far away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2006
At 3 a.m., oil began gushing from a derrick on a ranch six miles east of Fullerton, setting off Orange County's second oil boom. The ranch was owned by Charles C. Chapman of Fullerton, a Valencia orange grower. Land prices in the Fullerton area skyrocketed and oil became a key to the city's growth in the early 1920s. Chapman was Fullerton's first mayor and chief benefactor of Chapman College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1995
During the Placentia oil boom of 1919, residents were urged to rent out extra rooms or beds to the oil workers who swarmed into the city. Each issue of the Anaheim Gazette devoted an entire page to oil news. By 1921, the city's oil production inspired Union Oil Co. to name one of its new tankers La Placentia. The 457-foot ship could carry 80,000 barrels. Source: "Placentia, A Pleasant Place" by Virginia L. Carpenter
NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Federal scientists have developed a system that could help prevent some contamination of wetlands and groundwater from oil development in the booming Williston Basin in Montana and North Dakota, according to a new study. Along with oil extracted from deep underground in the Williston Basin comes naturally occurring water called brine that is 10 times more saline than seawater and is dumped into reserve pits. Brine can contaminate local water sources through leaching from the pits, pipeline spills or accidents.  At many area oil wells, 10 barrels of brine are produced for every barrel of oil, making brine disposal a significant issue as Williston Basin oil extraction flourishes.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON - On a stretch of ranchland nestled in the North Dakota Badlands, under dark, star-filled night skies, serene landscape and solitude, Theodore Roosevelt formed his strong conservationist ideals more than a century ago. But the night skies around the former president's Elkhorn Ranch, referred to as the "cradle of conservation" by environmentalists and historians, now glow orange. From some of the highest points in what is now Theodore Roosevelt National Park, dozens of natural gas flares are visible not far away.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - About sundown one Sunday in September, North Dakota farmer Steven Jensen noticed that his combine was running over wet, squishy earth in a wheat field he was harvesting. When he took a closer look, he saw that oil had coated the wheels and that it was bubbling up about 6 inches high in spots. That was Sept. 29; Jensen contacted authorities immediately. At least 20,600 barrels of oil leaked onto the Jensens' land from a pipeline owned by Tesoro Logistics, one of the largest land-based spills in recent history.
WORLD
October 21, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
FORT CHIPEWYAN, Canada - In the Cree language, the word "athabasca" means "a place where grass is everywhere. " Here in Alberta, the Athabasca River slices through forests of spruce and birch before spilling into a vast freshwater delta and Lake Athabasca. But 100 miles upstream, the boreal forest has been peeled back by enormous strip mines, where massive shovels pick up 100 tons of earth at a time and dump it into yellow trucks as big as houses. The tarry bitumen that is extracted is eventually shipped to refineries, many in the United States, to be processed into gasoline, diesel and other fuels.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Oil extracted from massive new fields in North Dakota and other states is rolling into California in growing quantities aboard long-haul freight trains, paralleling a surge in crude moving on rail across North America. More than 200,000 barrels of crude per month were imported into California this summer, a fourfold increase from early 2012, according to data compiled by the California Energy Commission. Though the total amount is still small, it marks a little-noticed departure from the state's reliance on its own declining oil patches, the Alaskan North Slope and foreign nations, led by Saudi Arabia.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
CASPER, Wyo. - These are boom times in the resource-rich Cowboy State, courtesy of an oil explosion whose ripples can be felt across the land. Good-paying blue-collar jobs in the petroleum and natural gas fields are as plentiful as pickups here, and the unemployment rate - 4.6% in July - remains far below the 7.4% national average. But critics worry that the prodigious oil output includes a potential byproduct. Despite such fast-dollar success, heavy reliance on a single industry known for its dramatic downturns could one day help paint the state into a precarious financial corner, they say. Many fear the day when Wyoming's oil market fails, as it last did in the mid-1980s, exposing a fundamental flaw in the state's job picture: The lure of the oil dollar has prompted teenagers to skip college, or abandon high school, for the petroleum fields - many without a Plan B if things go bust.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican government said its 1991 budget, submitted to congress Thursday, reflects its commitment to conservative fiscal management. Despite the windfall from the Persian Gulf crisis, the $70-billion budget is based on oil selling at half the current price. The price of oil, which accounts for one-third of the government's income, has skyrocketed since August. It is now selling for about $34 a barrel on world markets.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
In the early days of California's oil boom, derricks crowded beaches, covered hillsides and dominated cityscapes. If a road was in the way of the oil, the road was moved. Nowadays, after years of falling oil production, the state is seeing a new drilling boom because of high petroleum prices. In July, an average of 53 rotary rigs were exploring for crude and natural gas in California, the most for that month in 22 years, according to industry data. Drillers looking to revive old urban oil fields find themselves surrounded by homes and businesses that weren't there way back when, and the companies are negotiating increasingly complex agreements with neighbors and local officials on rules governing aesthetics, noise, hours of operation and much more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - California may be on the brink of another great oil boom. It consequently could be heading into an environmental disaster. A state senator from Agoura Hills is trying to allow the first while heading off the second. Democrat Fran Pavley's oil fracking regulation bill is one of the most significant and controversial that the Legislature is fighting over in the final days of its 2013 session, scheduled to adjourn Sept. 13. Unless you have been buried 10,000 feet underground with all that untapped oil, you've probably read about fracking, formally known as hydraulic fracturing.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2013 | By Shan Li
The chief executive of oil giant Chevron Corp. says that oil and gas producers must regulate themselves more tightly over hydraulic fracturing to address "legitimate concerns" that the practice is unsafe and harmful to the environment. At an event for the Center for Strategic and International Studies, John Watson said the energy industry must work harder to police itself as the public learns more about so-called fracking, the controversial technique that involves injecting large volumes of chemically laced water and sand deep into the ground to release oil or gas. "There are some risks out there.
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