Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOil Drilling
IN THE NEWS

Oil Drilling

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
In the wake of a huge oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico, Assemblyman Pedro Nava (D-Santa Barbara) is expected to lead a hearing Friday in Hermosa Beach on the state's ability to help cities challenge massive oil-drilling projects near homes, schools and parks. Among those called to testify before the Assembly Committee on Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials, which Nava chairs, are officials from Hermosa Beach, Culver City and Carpinteria, which are involved in costly legal battles over drilling.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The oil-rich city of Carson has imposed an emergency moratorium on all new drilling, halting efforts by a petroleum company to bore more than 200 wells near homes and a state university. The drilling ban, which runs for 45 days but could be extended up to two years, was driven by a fear that Occidental Petroleum would employ hydraulic fracturing to coax oil from one of the city's vast oil fields. Occidental has repeatedly denied it will use fracking, an extraction technique that involves blasting a mix of water, chemicals and sand deep into the ground to fracture rock formations and free trapped oil. Critics contend the practice can contaminate groundwater or even trigger earthquakes when water is injected underground.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The oil-rich city of Carson has imposed an emergency moratorium on all new drilling, halting efforts by a petroleum company to bore more than 200 wells near homes and a state university. The drilling ban, which runs for 45 days but could be extended up to two years, was driven by a fear that Occidental Petroleum would employ hydraulic fracturing to coax oil from one of the city's vast oil fields. Occidental has repeatedly denied it will use fracking, an extraction technique that involves blasting a mix of water, chemicals and sand deep into the ground to fracture rock formations and free trapped oil. Critics contend the practice can contaminate groundwater or even trigger earthquakes when water is injected underground.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
CARRIZO SPRINGS, Texas - Just a few years ago this was a sleepy town of 5,600, and people eked out a living from the land. They farmed, worked ranches and leased their property to hunters to make a few dollars. Now, an oil and gas boom is transforming the economy of south Texas, turning Carrizo Springs into a busy city of at least 40,000. Texas oil companies, tapping a vast formation called the Eagle Ford shale, have nearly doubled oil production over the last two years and by next year are expected to produce 4 million barrels a day. That would catapult Texas ahead of Iran, Iraq and the United Arab Emirates to become the fifth-biggest oil producer in the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1999
Re "Oil Drilling Battle Looms Over Tracts Off Central Coast," June 7. When it comes down to choosing between $2 a gallon for gas and having more drilling platforms off the California coast, I'll take the platforms any day. Our coast is no more environmentally sensitive than the Gulf of Mexico coast, and they seem to be doing fine. NORMAN HEATH, Oxnard
NATIONAL
February 17, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
One of the last significant hurdles to offshore oil drilling in the Arctic has been cleared with approval of a plan for dealing with a nightmare scenario - an oil spill at the top of the world. The Obama administration on Friday approved Shell Gulf of Mexico Inc.'s plan for responding to an accident should it occur in the Chukchi Sea. The company hopes to begin exploratory drilling there, 70 miles off the northwest coast of Alaska, in June. The issue of how to clean up a spill in the remote waters, 1,000 miles from the nearest U.S. Coast Guard base, has proved to be the biggest impediment to opening the most significant new frontier in U.S. energy development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The city of Whittier and a conservation group have reached an agreement to allow a controversial oil-drilling project under a nature preserve, a proposal that immediately drew fire from opponents. Under the settlement, the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, a regional government entity dedicated to preserving open space and wildlife, is to receive up to $11.25 million a year from the city of Whittier's royalties from the oil. The authority will use the money to buy and preserve land elsewhere in the county.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- In spite of a White House veto threat, the Republican-controlled House on Friday launched a new effort to open up the California and Atlantic coasts to oil drilling. The measure is a long shot in the face of fierce opposition in the Democratic-led Senate and from the White House. Still, Republicans are eager to stoke the debate over offshore drilling and highlight differences between the parties over energy policy heading into next year's election battles for control of the House and Senate.
OPINION
April 1, 2010 | By David Helvarg
President Obama's decision to have Interior Secretary Ken Salazar open vast new areas of federal ocean waters to offshore oil drilling is no surprise. In his State of the Union address, the president explained that his vision for a clean energy future included offshore drilling, nuclear power and clean coal. Unfortunately, that's like advocating a healthy diet based on fast-food snacking, amphetamines and low-tar cigarettes. If the arguments you hear in the coming days for expanded drilling sound familiar, it's because they've been repeated for generations.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The U.S. government violated the law when it opened millions of acres of the Arctic Ocean to offshore oil drilling, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, possibly delaying plans by companies such as Royal Dutch Shell to drill off the northwest coast of Alaska in the near future. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled that the Interior Department did not properly evaluate the impact of oil development in the Chukchi Sea when it sold more than $2.6 billion in development leases in the environmentally sensitive area in 2008.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Shell's decision to give up on Arctic Ocean oil drilling for 2014 is good news for the environment. Now if only the oil companies - and the Obama administration - would give up altogether on the idea of drilling in such a remote and harsh place . Yes, there are arguments for ramping up domestic oil production to reduce our dependency on foreign oil, but the bigger issue is our dependence on oil, period. It's mind-boggling that we talk about trying to reduce global warming caused by burning fossil fuels while at the same time pursuing policies that will bring us more fossil fuels to burn, and at a cheaper price.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The U.S. government violated the law when it opened millions of acres of the Arctic Ocean to offshore oil drilling, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, possibly delaying plans by companies such as Royal Dutch Shell to drill off the northwest coast of Alaska in the near future. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco ruled that the Interior Department did not properly evaluate the impact of oil development in the Chukchi Sea when it sold more than $2.6 billion in development leases in the environmentally sensitive area in 2008.
WORLD
November 8, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Political science professor Sergei Medvedev, a longtime lover and explorer of the Arctic, drew the ire of Russian President Vladimir Putin when he recently called for international protection of the icy northern region in the face of economic development plans. Last month, Putin called Medvedev, who teaches at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, "a moron. " The incident prompted a nationwide discussion of the Arctic and coincided with the arrest of 30 Greenpeace activists protesting a Russian oil drilling project in the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
The 2014 gubernatorial campaign officially began Tuesday, with tea party favorite Tim Donnelly, a Republican assemblyman from the Inland Empire, announcing that he is running for governor. "I want to let Jerry Brown know that … not only are we coming for him, but the people of the state of California are coming for their freedom back," Donnelly said, flanked by his wife, three of their five children and dozens of supporters at a sawdust-covered furniture factory in Baldwin Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2013 | By Seema Mehta and Louis Sahagun
Los Angeles County leaders voted unanimously Tuesday to oppose a plan to drill for oil in publicly owned parkland in the Whittier hills, saying the proposal would undermine open space protection throughout the county. "Oil and open space don't mix," Supervisor Gloria Molina said after the vote, noting that the land was purchased with taxpayer money earmarked for conservation efforts. "We've purchased hundreds of acres of land across Los Angeles County using millions of Prop. A dollars.
WORLD
October 23, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Russian officials on Wednesday dropped piracy charges against Greenpeace activists who were jailed last month after protesting oil drilling in the Arctic, charging them instead with hooliganism. An investigation led officials to issue the less severe charges of hooliganism, which carry a maximum penalty of seven years, instead of piracy, which could mean up to 15 years in prison, Russia's Investigative Committee said in a statement. “A big volume of work was conducted by the investigators, which established an objective picture of the events that happened,” investigative committee spokesman Vladimir Markin said late Wednesday on the agency's website.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - Six months after federal officials chastised Shell Oil for its faulty offshore drilling operations in the Arctic, the company has yet to explain what safeguards it has put in place or when it plans to resume exploring for oil in the vulnerable region. Shell's 2012 return to offshore Arctic exploration after a generation away was marred by high-profile problems, including hefty fines for polluting the air and a drilling rig that ran aground. The company canceled its 2013 drilling season, and its 2014 operations are in question.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|