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Oil Drilling Arctic

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Displaying a giant banner protesting global warming, Greenpeace, the confrontational environmental group that has known better days, on Wednesday brought its campaign against oil exploration in the arctic to downtown Los Angeles. Two activists climbed 13 stories up Atlantic Richfield's 51-story building before unfurling a banner featuring a polar bear and reading "Arctic Oil: Global Warming, Chill the Drills."
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NATIONAL
August 30, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration has given permission to Shell Oil to begin what it calls “preparatory work” in its controversial effort to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean off the coast of Alaska. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said the permission will allow Shell to install a blowout preventer ahead of exploratory oil drilling. The preparatory work involves drilling to install the needed equipment, but the drilling will avoid pockets of oil and gas, Salazar said. Shell still has other hurdles to cross before it can actually drill for oil -- and winter deadlines are looming.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 1987 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union has offered an oil-drilling concession to Occidental Petroleum, its first to a private company, Occidental Chairman Armand Hammer said Friday. The project would be carried out at an Arctic site where Soviet technology isn't good enough to raise oil, Hammer said. Hammer, the industrialist whose ties with the Soviets date to business activities there in the 1920s, said Occidental is negotiating terms of the project.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
One of the last significant hurdles to offshore oil drilling in the Arctic has been cleared with approval of a plan for dealing with a nightmare scenario - an oil spill at the top of the world. The Obama administration on Friday approved Shell Gulf of Mexico Inc.'s plan for responding to an accident should it occur in the Chukchi Sea. The company hopes to begin exploratory drilling there, 70 miles off the northwest coast of Alaska, in June. The issue of how to clean up a spill in the remote waters, 1,000 miles from the nearest U.S. Coast Guard base, has proved to be the biggest impediment to opening the most significant new frontier in U.S. energy development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1995
In your July 10 article about oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, drilling proponents advocate spending large sums of money to permanently alter a pristine wilderness, resulting in at best 30 years of oil or at worst the "world's most expensive dry hole." In either case this country eventually ends up just as dependent on foreign oil as we are today. The resources required to open up ANWR to oil drilling would be far better spent on the development of practical, affordable electric vehicles.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
One of the last significant hurdles to offshore oil drilling in the Arctic has been cleared with approval of a plan for dealing with a nightmare scenario - an oil spill at the top of the world. The Obama administration on Friday approved Shell Gulf of Mexico Inc.'s plan for responding to an accident should it occur in the Chukchi Sea. The company hopes to begin exploratory drilling there, 70 miles off the northwest coast of Alaska, in June. The issue of how to clean up a spill in the remote waters, 1,000 miles from the nearest U.S. Coast Guard base, has proved to be the biggest impediment to opening the most significant new frontier in U.S. energy development.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration has given permission to Shell Oil to begin what it calls “preparatory work” in its controversial effort to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean off the coast of Alaska. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said the permission will allow Shell to install a blowout preventer ahead of exploratory oil drilling. The preparatory work involves drilling to install the needed equipment, but the drilling will avoid pockets of oil and gas, Salazar said. Shell still has other hurdles to cross before it can actually drill for oil -- and winter deadlines are looming.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley, Tribune Washington Bureau
In a rare recent case of siding with the oil industry, the Obama administration has asked a federal judge to allow some exploratory steps toward drilling for oil and gas in the Arctic Ocean. Late last month, a district judge in Alaska blocked all drilling-related activities in the Arctic's Chukchi Sea, citing gaps in the government's environmental impact assessments for drilling leases auctioned off during the George W. Bush administration. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar responded Friday by asking the court to narrow the ruling to allow drilling giant Statoil, which owns several Chukchi leases, to begin seismic testing in the area.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Note to future visitors of the Kansas State Capitol: Next time, you might want to leave your improvised explosive devices at home. Even if they're, um, fireworks. Police are still mum about the particulars of a Wednesday bomb scare in which they reenacted “Hurt Locker” on an illegally parked truck outside the statehouse. On its surface, the incident had all the hallmarks of a potential act of domestic terrorism. During a contentious and highly visible political debate happening in the Legislature, a suspicious truck covered in aggressive bumper stickers was found in a place it didn't belong.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2012 | By Ian Duncan
The Maryland House of Delegates narrowly approved legalization of gay marriage late Friday, clearing the way for final passage next week and the expected signature of  Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley. That would make Maryland the eighth state with a law on the books legalizing gay marriage, though it would have to survive an expected attempt to block it by referendum. In debate before the vote, Delegate Anne Kaiser, one of seven openly gay members of the House, said that she wanted, "Marriage.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley, Tribune Washington Bureau
In a rare recent case of siding with the oil industry, the Obama administration has asked a federal judge to allow some exploratory steps toward drilling for oil and gas in the Arctic Ocean. Late last month, a district judge in Alaska blocked all drilling-related activities in the Arctic's Chukchi Sea, citing gaps in the government's environmental impact assessments for drilling leases auctioned off during the George W. Bush administration. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar responded Friday by asking the court to narrow the ruling to allow drilling giant Statoil, which owns several Chukchi leases, to begin seismic testing in the area.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
The Senate on Wednesday narrowly rejected President Bush's bid to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling, dealing a blow to a White House that has argued increasing domestic energy production is critical to national security. Drilling supporters pointed to the war with Iraq as underscoring the need to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Displaying a giant banner protesting global warming, Greenpeace, the confrontational environmental group that has known better days, on Wednesday brought its campaign against oil exploration in the arctic to downtown Los Angeles. Two activists climbed 13 stories up Atlantic Richfield's 51-story building before unfurling a banner featuring a polar bear and reading "Arctic Oil: Global Warming, Chill the Drills."
BUSINESS
April 25, 1987 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union has offered an oil-drilling concession to Occidental Petroleum, its first to a private company, Occidental Chairman Armand Hammer said Friday. The project would be carried out at an Arctic site where Soviet technology isn't good enough to raise oil, Hammer said. Hammer, the industrialist whose ties with the Soviets date to business activities there in the 1920s, said Occidental is negotiating terms of the project.
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