Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOil Drilling California
IN THE NEWS

Oil Drilling California

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | MARK LAWRENCE and FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writers
A joint congressional committee, resolving differences between the Senate and House over proposed offshore oil drilling in the West, decided Tuesday not to allow the sale of any leases in the next year for two large areas of the California coast and another area on the Alaska coast. Both candidates in the California Senate race immediately took credit for prompting the action, which environmentalists hailed as a major victory in the struggle to protect the California coast from drilling.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 20, 2010
WellPoint's errors Re "Undone by the numbers," Column One, July 16 The terms hero, warrior and battlefield are too often used in reference to sports. A hero is someone who ignores his own well-being and perseveres to help others. David Axene is an American hero. Disregarding his own ill health, he worked tirelessly to find errors in WellPoint's 39% increase for healthcare premiums to save precious dollars for those that have so few these days. This man deserves the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
They are the most traditional-looking Indians in Santa Barbara County. Many wear their hair in braids and dress in full Indian regalia at public hearings. Some have assumed names such as White Bear and Mushu. They have more political power, county officials say, and have made more money monitoring construction sites for Chumash artifacts than any other Indian group in the area.
NEWS
June 23, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A federal judge has effectively blocked new oil drilling off the California coast, ruling that state officials must first decide whether such drilling would impair the surrounding environment. The landmark decision by a U.S. District Court judge in Oakland bars exploration in undeveloped tracts in federal waters off the state's coast until the California Coastal Commission reviews the impact on water quality, marine life, air quality and scenic vistas.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | JANET WILSON and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Adding fuel to the fierce debate about oil drilling off California's coast, U.S. Coast Guard laboratory tests have concluded that tar balls found on an Orange County beach in June probably came from a massive offshore oil-drilling complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state report that says the amount of oil recovered from the Feb. 7 tanker spill off Huntington Beach was vastly overstated should send a message to President Bush not to permit any new oil drilling off the Southern California coast, a top state official said Tuesday. State Controller Gray Davis, chairman of the State Lands Commission, said in Los Angeles that "more oil drilling means more oil tankers and, Mr. Bush, we don't need more tankers. . . . The Huntington Beach accident was enough."
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal agency overseeing offshore oil development announced Friday that it will temporarily suspend plans for new drilling off California's coast to allow more time to study the proposals. The decision by the U.S. Minerals Management Service leaves in place a six-year prohibition of new oil exploration in 40 undeveloped leases along the Central Coast until Aug. 16.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | ERIC BAILEY and GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a decade of calm, California's long-running battle over offshore oil is about to flare anew. Federal officials are expected this month to grant oil companies permission to press ahead with development of 40 sea-bottom leases off the Central Coast, a majority of them in untapped waters off southern San Luis Obispo County. Renewed exploration could kick off later this year, with construction beginning in 2005 on the first of four proposed oil platforms in federal waters. Gov.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move heralded by environmentalists, President Bush on Thursday pledged to create an ocean sanctuary that virtually guarantees one-quarter of California's coastline permanent protection from offshore oil and gas drilling. The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, which will encompass an area bigger than the state of Connecticut, stretches from San Francisco Bay south to San Simeon Creek in San Luis Obispo County.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California cities and counties may owe their employees as much as $2 billion for unpaid overtime work, under a ruling the Supreme Court let stand Tuesday. Los Angeles County officials said the ruling affects 23,000 of its 78,000 full-time employees and could cost the county $170 million. The decision covers all public employees who may have been considered exempt from overtime pay but whose wages can be docked if they miss a few hours of work.
NEWS
May 5, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Bush administration's decision to weaken federal protection of roadless regions of national forests could throw open to development an unspoiled section of the Los Padres National Forest that contains untapped oil reserves. The sprawling Los Padres, the only national forest in California with appreciable oil and gas reserves, already produces 700,000 barrels of oil per year, primarily from a field near Fillmore.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis announced Tuesday that California has filed a lawsuit against the federal government to block extensions for offshore oil leases that could eventually be used to dramatically expand production off the Central Coast. The lawsuit demands that the state be allowed to scrutinize the 36 disputed oil tracts prior to any federal actions.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a step to block a new round of oil drilling off the Central Coast, the California Coastal Commission signaled its willingness Wednesday to go to court to stop development of decades-old oil leases. Meeting in Los Angeles on Wednesday, commissioners decided in closed session that "if we have to, we'll file suit," said Executive Director Peter Douglas.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | JANET WILSON and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Adding fuel to the fierce debate about oil drilling off California's coast, U.S. Coast Guard laboratory tests have concluded that tar balls found on an Orange County beach in June probably came from a massive offshore oil-drilling complex.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY and GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The California Coastal Commission will send a letter to federal officials asserting the state's authority to begin an immediate review of plans to dramatically expand oil drilling off the state's Central Coast, officials said Thursday. Members of the coastal panel said a change in federal law gives them the right to review offshore oil drilling leases that skirted state scrutiny when they were first approved nearly 20 years ago. At that time, the U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal agency overseeing offshore oil development announced Friday that it will temporarily suspend plans for new drilling off California's coast to allow more time to study the proposals. The decision by the U.S. Minerals Management Service leaves in place a six-year prohibition of new oil exploration in 40 undeveloped leases along the Central Coast until Aug. 16.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Exxon and Santa Barbara County officials announced Wednesday that they have reached an agreement to clear the way for the largest American offshore oil and gas development outside of Alaska's Beaufort Sea. Known as the Santa Ynez Unit, the $2.5-billion to $3-billion project covers 91,000 acres in federal waters seven to nine miles off Point Conception on the Santa Barbara County coast.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The seascape along the Santa Barbara Channel has been colored for decades by surfers, pelicans, freighters and offshore oil drilling platforms. Four of the oil rigs are nicknamed Heidi, Hope, Hazel and Hilda. These Erector-set-like hunks of metal stand 80 feet above the water, weigh 6 million pounds and together have pumped up 63 million barrels of crude oil for Chevron. And by August, they should be gone.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An oil-drilling platform nine miles off the Orange County coast has been shut down so investigators can determine if an underwater pipeline leaked oil over the weekend. Platform Eureka will remain closed until the suspected leak in a pipeline 700 feet beneath the ocean surface is found and mended, federal officials said Monday. A remote control submarine will be deployed today to scrutinize the pipeline for a leak.
NEWS
June 7, 1999 | ERIC BAILEY and GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After a decade of calm, California's long-running battle over offshore oil is about to flare anew. Federal officials are expected this month to grant oil companies permission to press ahead with development of 40 sea-bottom leases off the Central Coast, a majority of them in untapped waters off southern San Luis Obispo County. Renewed exploration could kick off later this year, with construction beginning in 2005 on the first of four proposed oil platforms in federal waters. Gov.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|