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Oil Drilling Southern California

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NEWS
May 1, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration has decided to withdraw 87 remaining tracts off the California coast from its new five-year plan for federal oil and gas leasing on the outer continental shelf. Totaling some 500,000 acres off Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, the tracts had been left vulnerable to development in 1990, when President Bush put the rest of the federal government's offshore tracts along the state's coastline off limits until the year 2000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if earthquakes weren't enough, there's another invisible danger lurking beneath the Los Angeles Basin, from Newport Beach north to Newhall. It is methane--a colorless, odorless, highly explosive gas naturally produced by the 70-odd oil fields on top of which much of the metropolitan area is built. The fields are primarily clustered along the area's major fault lines, where oil seeps out of ruptured rock.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oil companies scrambled Tuesday to assess the damage that they might suffer from President Bush's sweeping decision to delay offshore drilling, but many had already given up hope of tapping any time soon what are believed to be massive underwater reserves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999 | EDWARD J. BOYER and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One witness thought it was "raining fire." The earth was belching flames through cracks in the pavement, tongues of fire marching in a steady progression across a shopping center parking lot on 3rd Street near Fairfax Avenue in West Los Angeles. The methane gas explosion that ripped through a Ross Dress for Less store in March 1985 left 24 people injured and forced the closure of stores in the center for several days.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
In a double defeat for environmentalists, the Senate Appropriations Committee on Wednesday approved a plan to sell Southern California offshore oil leases in 1989 instead of 1990 and voted to delete funds for a study exploring the destruction of the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, effectively killing a proposal for restoring the area. The committee action, taken after little discussion of the two measures, followed a recommendation by the panel's interior subcommittee Monday.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush sidestepped two controversial environmental issues Monday as he took a brief swing along the West Coast. In Portland, Ore., where Bush arrived Sunday night and left Monday morning, the President avoided committing himself on protection for the northern spotted owl, the bird whose fate has been bound up with the future of the Northwest's remaining stands of "old growth" virgin forest. Bush called for "balance" but did not define it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if earthquakes weren't enough, there's another invisible danger lurking beneath the Los Angeles Basin, from Newport Beach north to Newhall. It is methane--a colorless, odorless, highly explosive gas naturally produced by the 70-odd oil fields on top of which much of the metropolitan area is built. The fields are primarily clustered along the area's major fault lines, where oil seeps out of ruptured rock.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two days of grinding hearings, the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday agreed to allow Chevron Corp. to ship Point Arguello crude oil via tanker south along the environmentally sensitive California coast to Los Angeles. The terms pleased environmentalists. But Chevron, which has wanted to use tankers for years, immediately rejected the board's proposal, saying too many strings remained attached.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Calling a surprise proposal to hasten oil drilling off the Southern California coast "mind boggling" and an "outrage," environmentalists, joined by officials from several coastal cities, protested the measure Thursday outside a Los Angeles hotel where Secretary of the Interior Donald P. Hodel spoke. Later, in response to reporters' questions, Hodel said that he, too, opposed the proposal to sell Southern California offshore oil leases in 1989 instead of 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999 | EDWARD J. BOYER and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One witness thought it was "raining fire." The earth was belching flames through cracks in the pavement, tongues of fire marching in a steady progression across a shopping center parking lot on 3rd Street near Fairfax Avenue in West Los Angeles. The methane gas explosion that ripped through a Ross Dress for Less store in March 1985 left 24 people injured and forced the closure of stores in the center for several days.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two days of grinding hearings, the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday agreed to allow Chevron Corp. to ship Point Arguello crude oil via tanker south along the environmentally sensitive California coast to Los Angeles. The terms pleased environmentalists. But Chevron, which has wanted to use tankers for years, immediately rejected the board's proposal, saying too many strings remained attached.
NEWS
May 1, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration has decided to withdraw 87 remaining tracts off the California coast from its new five-year plan for federal oil and gas leasing on the outer continental shelf. Totaling some 500,000 acres off Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, the tracts had been left vulnerable to development in 1990, when President Bush put the rest of the federal government's offshore tracts along the state's coastline off limits until the year 2000.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oil companies scrambled Tuesday to assess the damage that they might suffer from President Bush's sweeping decision to delay offshore drilling, but many had already given up hope of tapping any time soon what are believed to be massive underwater reserves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1990 | ROBERT H. SULNICK, Robert H. Sulnick is executive director of American Oceans Campaign, based in Santa Monica.
At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, we were seduced by oil. The thick, black substance powered our inventions. It made our economy grow. We had no idea that oil was an environmental poison that would one day pollute our air and threaten to spoil our oceans. In the 1920s, we learned that certain properties of oil are uncontrollable: No amount of preparation and care can prevent a well blowout.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush sidestepped two controversial environmental issues Monday as he took a brief swing along the West Coast. In Portland, Ore., where Bush arrived Sunday night and left Monday morning, the President avoided committing himself on protection for the northern spotted owl, the bird whose fate has been bound up with the future of the Northwest's remaining stands of "old growth" virgin forest. Bush called for "balance" but did not define it.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Calling a surprise proposal to hasten oil drilling off the Southern California coast "mind boggling" and an "outrage," environmentalists, joined by officials from several coastal cities, protested the measure Thursday outside a Los Angeles hotel where Secretary of the Interior Donald P. Hodel spoke. Later, in response to reporters' questions, Hodel said that he, too, opposed the proposal to sell Southern California offshore oil leases in 1989 instead of 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1990 | ROBERT H. SULNICK, Robert H. Sulnick is executive director of American Oceans Campaign, based in Santa Monica.
At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, we were seduced by oil. The thick, black substance powered our inventions. It made our economy grow. We had no idea that oil was an environmental poison that would one day pollute our air and threaten to spoil our oceans. In the 1920s, we learned that certain properties of oil are uncontrollable: No amount of preparation and care can prevent a well blowout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1987 | Bob Schwartz
The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday night in favor of a resolution opposing the U.S. Department of the Interior's proposed five-year offshore oil leasing program. The program, as outlined by Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel, would open for possible oil and gas exploration a large area off the Orange County coastline, with a six-mile buffer zone extending seaward from Newport Beach to Dana Point.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
In a double defeat for environmentalists, the Senate Appropriations Committee on Wednesday approved a plan to sell Southern California offshore oil leases in 1989 instead of 1990 and voted to delete funds for a study exploring the destruction of the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, effectively killing a proposal for restoring the area. The committee action, taken after little discussion of the two measures, followed a recommendation by the panel's interior subcommittee Monday.
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