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Oil Drilling Utah

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BUSINESS
March 29, 1997 | Associated Press
Conoco has received final permission from Utah to begin drilling for oil Tuesday on state land in the nation's newest national monument, Grand Staircase-Escalante. The approval last week has prompted environmentalists to lodge protests with Conoco and its parent, DuPont Co. Utah law does not allow a legal challenge to such drilling permits. But members of the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance said they hope to convince the companies that drilling in the area would be a public relations disaster.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 1997 | Associated Press
Conoco has received final permission from Utah to begin drilling for oil Tuesday on state land in the nation's newest national monument, Grand Staircase-Escalante. The approval last week has prompted environmentalists to lodge protests with Conoco and its parent, DuPont Co. Utah law does not allow a legal challenge to such drilling permits. But members of the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance said they hope to convince the companies that drilling in the area would be a public relations disaster.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008 | Diane Haithman
Artist Nancy Holt, the widow of artist Robert Smithson, is encouraging others in the arts world to protest plans for exploratory oil drilling in Utah's Great Salt Lake that may have an impact on her late husband's 1,500-foot-long, 15-foot-wide environmental artwork "Spiral Jetty." The giant "earthwork," built in 1970 of mud, salt crystals, basalt rocks and water on the northeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake, near Rozel Point, is considered perhaps Smithson's most important work.
NATIONAL
August 17, 2003 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
When President Bush nominated Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency, he praised Leavitt's skills as a consensus builder. He particularly credited Leavitt for corralling 13 governors and 13 Indian tribal leaders, as well as environmental activists and industry leaders, behind one plan to clear the haze obscuring scenic views across the West. On this issue, environmentalists and utility executives alike give Leavitt high marks.
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