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BUSINESS
February 11, 1991 | Times staff and wire reports
INDONESIA: Indonesia is benefiting from the Persian Gulf crisis, if its soaring oil exports are an indication. The nation exported $1.31 billion in oil and gas in November, up a whopping 85% from a year earlier. Its exports for the month, including oil and gas, reached $2.63 billion, providing a trade surplus of $317 million. The price of oil surged after Iraq invaded Kuwait last August. Oil and gas accounted for 40% of Indonesia's export earnings in 1990.
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BUSINESS
February 11, 1991 | Times staff and wire reports
INDONESIA: Indonesia is benefiting from the Persian Gulf crisis, if its soaring oil exports are an indication. The nation exported $1.31 billion in oil and gas in November, up a whopping 85% from a year earlier. Its exports for the month, including oil and gas, reached $2.63 billion, providing a trade surplus of $317 million. The price of oil surged after Iraq invaded Kuwait last August. Oil and gas accounted for 40% of Indonesia's export earnings in 1990.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1988 | From Reuters
President Suharto of Indonesia appointed a new energy secretary on Monday, replacing former OPEC president and longtime oil-price moderate Subroto in a sweeping cabinet shake-up. The new minister of mines and energy is Ginandjar Kartasasmita, a Japanese-educated martial arts enthusiast. Ginandjar, 46, was chairman of the Investment Coordinating Board in the old cabinet and is seen by foreign businessmen as a tough negotiator and strong nationalist.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The 13,000 islands and islets of Indonesia form an immense basket across the bottom of Southeast Asia, brimming with resources, diverse cultures and 175 million people. But for decades this potential powerhouse has seemed a relative void on the geopolitical map, a black hole from which nothing emanates. What cynics say of Brazil in the Americas could hold true for Indonesia in Asia: It's the country of tomorrow, and always will be.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1987 | From United Press International
Indonesia, hit hard by the recent drop in oil and gas prices, is scrambling to boost exports of other products. With a population of 167 million, many desperately poor, the Southeast Asian archipelago nation has long depended on revenue from oil and gas for development income. Last year's decline in oil prices triggered a 30% drop in the country's total foreign exchange earnings and brought oil and gas income to less than 50% of government income for the first time in 13 years.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | KENNETH L. WHITING, Associated Press
Although it has plenty of oil, natural gas, coal and other sources of energy, Indonesia is considering a nuclear power plant as a backstop against the day when the other resources won't be enough. Supporters of the nuclear option say the country has little choice because demand for electricity on the main island of Java is expected to increase more than sixfold by the year 2015. Java is home to more than 60% of Indonesia's 180 million people and uses 80% of its energy.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The 13,000 islands and islets of Indonesia form an immense basket across the bottom of Southeast Asia, brimming with resources, diverse cultures and 175 million people. But for decades this potential powerhouse has seemed a relative void on the geopolitical map, a black hole from which nothing emanates. What cynics say of Brazil in the Americas could hold true for Indonesia in Asia: It's the country of tomorrow, and always will be.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Mobil Corp. must face a lawsuit by villagers in Indonesia who say the company contributed to human rights abuses by government security forces. U.S. Judge Louis Oberdorfer in Washington denied a motion by Exxon and ExxonMobil Oil Indonesia to dismiss the suit, saying there was evidence Indonesian security forces under contract with the companies committed atrocities. The villagers sued in 2001, claiming that Indonesian soldiers working for the Irving, Texas, company committed murder, torture and rape in Aceh province, where the company operates a government-owned oil and natural gas field and a pipeline.
OPINION
November 30, 2009 | By Jeff Corwin
There is a holocaust happening. Right now. And it's not confined to one nation or even one region. It is a global crisis. Species are going extinct en masse. Every 20 minutes we lose an animal species. If this rate continues, by century's end, 50% of all living species will be gone. It is a phenomenon known as the sixth extinction. The fifth extinction took place 65 million years ago when a meteor smashed into the Earth, killing off the dinosaurs and many other species and opening the door for the rise of mammals.
OPINION
March 28, 2007
Re "Britain demands Iran free 15," March 24 Does anyone believe it is a coincidence that the Iranian navy snatched 15 British servicemen in Iraqi waters just before the U.N. Security Council unanimously passed a resolution imposing heavier sanctions on Iran for the continuing development of nuclear weapons? Does anyone believe that it is coincidental that, after Hamas and Hezbollah kidnapped Israeli soldiers, Iran did the same with British soldiers? Iran gets PR value, and it can use the soldiers for propaganda purposes and as hostages for potential exchange for political purposes.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | KENNETH L. WHITING, Associated Press
Although it has plenty of oil, natural gas, coal and other sources of energy, Indonesia is considering a nuclear power plant as a backstop against the day when the other resources won't be enough. Supporters of the nuclear option say the country has little choice because demand for electricity on the main island of Java is expected to increase more than sixfold by the year 2015. Java is home to more than 60% of Indonesia's 180 million people and uses 80% of its energy.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1988 | From Reuters
President Suharto of Indonesia appointed a new energy secretary on Monday, replacing former OPEC president and longtime oil-price moderate Subroto in a sweeping cabinet shake-up. The new minister of mines and energy is Ginandjar Kartasasmita, a Japanese-educated martial arts enthusiast. Ginandjar, 46, was chairman of the Investment Coordinating Board in the old cabinet and is seen by foreign businessmen as a tough negotiator and strong nationalist.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1987 | From United Press International
Indonesia, hit hard by the recent drop in oil and gas prices, is scrambling to boost exports of other products. With a population of 167 million, many desperately poor, the Southeast Asian archipelago nation has long depended on revenue from oil and gas for development income. Last year's decline in oil prices triggered a 30% drop in the country's total foreign exchange earnings and brought oil and gas income to less than 50% of government income for the first time in 13 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991 | PAM MILLER
A 42-year-old Ventura man has been convicted on charges of federal wire and mail fraud in connection with business dealings with Mobil Oil of Indonesia, an FBI spokesman said. Howard B. Nicholls, formerly president of National Equipment and Supply Co. in Ventura, was convicted after having employees substitute less-expensive and less-reliable equipment for items ordered by Mobil, said FBI spokesman Gary Auer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER HEREDIA
A 44-year-old Ventura man has pleaded guilty to two counts of mail fraud and one count of wire fraud in connection with business dealings with Mobil Oil of Indonesia, the U. S. attorney's office said. Howard Bruce Nicholls, former president of the now-defunct National Equipment and Supply Co. in Ventura, pleaded guilty Monday to the charges, Assistant U. S. Atty. Daniel O'Brien said Wednesday.
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