Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOil Industry Colombia
IN THE NEWS

Oil Industry Colombia

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 1, 2000 | Times Wire Reports
A Colombian court has ordered Occidental Petroleum Corp. to halt all work on a promising oil site that the country's native U'wa tribe claims as part of its ancestral lands. Alberto Calderon, president of state oil company Ecopetrol, said the court injunction was handed down Thursday and would effectively block, if upheld on appeal, what he described as "the most important oil prospect this country has."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 29, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of a semi-nomadic people from the cloud forests of northeast Colombia urged Occidental Petroleum Corp. shareholders Friday to sell their stock to protest an oil-drilling project the tribe contends is on its sacred ancestral lands. The normally genteel Oxy annual meeting always begins with the Pledge of Allegiance and ends with a catered lunch, but this year shareholders also were greeted by a crowd of more than 100 chanting, drumbeating, sign-waving activists.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the toughest challenges faced by Colombia's new president, Cesar Gaviria, is how to stop attacks by an armed group whose terrorist tactics have cost the country millions of dollars. The enemy in this case is not the Medellin cocaine cartel but a small band of leftist guerrillas, the National Liberation Army, or ELN. The Marxist-Leninist group has caused serious damage to both the economy and environment through an unrelenting sabotage campaign against petroleum facilities.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2000 | Times Wire Reports
A Colombian court has ordered Occidental Petroleum Corp. to halt all work on a promising oil site that the country's native U'wa tribe claims as part of its ancestral lands. Alberto Calderon, president of state oil company Ecopetrol, said the court injunction was handed down Thursday and would effectively block, if upheld on appeal, what he described as "the most important oil prospect this country has."
NEWS
May 13, 1988
Leftist guerrillas who last week kidnaped 15 foreigners and local journalists in Colombia have now blown up part of the nation's main oil pipeline, spilling about 2,000 barrels of crude oil and interrupting pumping operations, Ecopetrol, the state oil company, reported.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leftist guerrillas were blamed Monday for the abduction on Sunday of five petroleum engineers, including three American citizens working in Colombia. The Medellin cocaine cartel, meanwhile, freed a kidnaped journalist after using him and at least nine other hostages to try to pressure the government into abandoning its anti-drug fight. The state oil company Ecopetrol said that two men and a woman saying they belonged to the National Liberation Army, or ELN, abducted three U.S.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. reportedly has agreed to abandon plans to drill for oil in the disputed Colombian homeland of a semi-nomadic tribe that threatens mass suicide if oil exploration goes forward.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum relishes its reputation for discovering oil and making money in politically turbulent environments. The late Chairman Armand Hammer's cloak-and-dagger adventures in Libya are part of oil industry lore.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1999 | Reuters; Bloomberg News
About 200 militant U'wa Indians in Colombia have seized the Gibraltar-1 test site, an area they claim as ancestral homelands, in an effort to prevent Occidental Petroleum Corp. from drilling for oil there. They pledged to "defend Mother Earth to the death." The 500,000-acre exploration area in northeast Colombia may harbor up to 2.5 billion barrels of crude and could ensure the country's energy needs well into the next century.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. reportedly has agreed to abandon plans to drill for oil in the disputed Colombian homeland of a semi-nomadic tribe that threatens mass suicide if oil exploration goes forward.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1997
Colombia's Ecopetrol and Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum Inc. began to pump and transport oil from eastern Colombia again after guerrilla attacks on a key pipeline shut down activities for six days. Workers from Ecopetrol finished repairs Saturday on the Cano Limon-Covenas pipeline, which carries about one-third of Colombia's oil output to port on the Caribbean coast.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1997 | (Chris Kraul)
Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum Corp. said it resumed oil production at its oil field in Cano Limon, Colombia, on Friday after an eight-day shutdown caused by guerrilla attacks on the 410-mile pipeline that connects the field with a Caribbean shipping depot. In two ambushes, guerrillas killed 30 Colombian soldiers sent to protect workers trying to repair the pipeline.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oil companies have encountered some tough opponents and have suffered their share of black eyes. But never have they come up against a dilemma like the one Occidental Petroleum of Los Angeles faces in the wilds of Colombia. A semi-nomadic tribe called the U'wa, 5,000 strong, is making the ultimate threat--to commit mass suicide by leaping from a cliff--in an attempt to prevent Oxy from drilling for oil in what the tribe claims is U'wa territory.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1996
Saba Petroleum Co. said it has received approval from Ecopetrol, the Colombian governm ent-owned oil company, to drill additional wells on Colombian acreage that Saba acquired last year. Saba said Omimex de Colombia Ltd., the operator, intends to drill up to six wells this year beginning in early October. Ecopetrol said it has also asked Omimex to test the exploratory wells drilled previously by Texaco Inc., the prior owner, on a portion of the undeveloped acreage.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Supporters of a semi-nomadic people from the cloud forests of northeast Colombia urged Occidental Petroleum Corp. shareholders Friday to sell their stock to protest an oil-drilling project the tribe contends is on its sacred ancestral lands. The normally genteel Oxy annual meeting always begins with the Pledge of Allegiance and ends with a catered lunch, but this year shareholders also were greeted by a crowd of more than 100 chanting, drumbeating, sign-waving activists.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1996
Saba Petroleum Co. said it has received approval from Ecopetrol, the Colombian governm ent-owned oil company, to drill additional wells on Colombian acreage that Saba acquired last year. Saba said Omimex de Colombia Ltd., the operator, intends to drill up to six wells this year beginning in early October. Ecopetrol said it has also asked Omimex to test the exploratory wells drilled previously by Texaco Inc., the prior owner, on a portion of the undeveloped acreage.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum relishes its reputation for discovering oil and making money in politically turbulent environments. The late Chairman Armand Hammer's cloak-and-dagger adventures in Libya are part of oil industry lore.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1993 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This nation, long known for its coffee exports, is perched on the edge of an oil boom that could boost its economy and finance improvement of its infrastructure. Pumping recently began in the mammoth Cusiana oil field in the northeastern state of Casanare, a development that adds an estimated 1.5 billion to 2.5 billion barrels to the nation's reserves and may be one of the largest finds in the Americas since fields detected in Alaska's Prudhoe Bay in 1968.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|