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NEWS
January 2, 1999 | From Reuters
At least 19 people have been shot dead in ethnic Ijaw areas since the expiration of an ultimatum to oil firms to leave, witnesses said Friday. Militant Ijaw youths alleging pollution and deprivation of wealth demanded that oil company workers leave by Dec. 30, at which time clashes erupted between soldiers and protesters in Yenegoa, capital of the country's biggest oil-producing state, Bayelsa. "Between yesterday and today, about 12 people have died and the protests have continued.
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NEWS
June 8, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Troops were told to shoot curfew breakers in Nigeria's oil industry hub of Warri after a fourth day of arson and killing blamed on ethnic rivalries brought the death toll to 10. State authorities imposed a 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. curfew and troops were told to shoot anybody caught breaking it. Barely a week after taking office to end 15 years of military rule, elected President Olusegun Obasanjo said he would visit the area this week and then come up with policies to bring lasting peace.
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NEWS
November 13, 1995 | From Reuters
An enraged international community Sunday heaped pressure on Nigeria for hanging nine minority-rights activists but ruled out oil sanctions as an immediate option against its military government. That exemption angered Nigerian human rights activists who argued that the oil industry is controlled by a tiny clique of people in power who are draining off national oil revenues for personal use.
NEWS
February 24, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights activists Tuesday accused multinational oil companies of complicity in human rights abuses carried out by this country's military regime in the oil-rich Niger Delta, charging that the firms have made no effort to condemn or intervene in the atrocities. A report issued by the U.S.-based Human Rights Watch placed responsibility for abuses committed in the tumultuous region equally with the government of Gen. Abdulsalami Abubakar and the oil firms.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Labor Leader Denies Nigerian Oil Strike Broken: The fired president of Nigeria's white-collar oil union denied reports that most members of the union were heeding a back-to-work decree from military ruler Sani Abacha. "The claim . . . is a hoax," Bola Owodunni told Reuters. "Only people on essential duties have resumed, and they are mostly management staff." Industry officials, meanwhile, said it was too early to tell if the 7-week-old protest was over.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police sealed off key trade union buildings in Lagos, enforcing Nigerian military ruler Gen. Sani Abacha's crackdown on striking oil workers trying to drive him from power. Oil union leaders, sacked from their posts by Abacha on Wednesday, vowed to continue their six-week strike, which has disrupted fuel deliveries and paralyzed the economy. Sources said the effect of Abacha's crackdown would not be known until Monday because of a holiday weekend starting today.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Strike Hurt Nigerian Oil Production: Crude oil production in Nigeria fell about 330,000 barrels a day last month because of the unsuccessful strike by oil workers seeking democracy, according to the International Energy Agency. The Paris-based agency, an arm of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, estimated that the West African nation pumped 1.5 million barrels a day in August during the strike, which was launched to force the military government of Gen.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | From Associated Press
Frustrated by lack of support from other Nigerians, thousands of oil workers returned to their jobs Monday and ended a two-month strike for democracy. It was a victory for Gen. Sani Abacha's military regime, which took a hard line against the strikers and other democracy activists despite the devastating effects of fuel shortages on the West African nation's faltering economy. The junta had arrested some leaders and forced others into hiding.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The military government deployed more troops in the oil-producing Niger River Delta, where youth protests are threatening the nation's revenue base. Residents said military checkpoints were set up in the area, where up to 26 people have died in a week of protests by ethnic Ijaw youths demanding a greater share of the region's wealth.
NEWS
January 2, 1999 | From Reuters
At least 19 people have been shot dead in ethnic Ijaw areas since the expiration of an ultimatum to oil firms to leave, witnesses said Friday. Militant Ijaw youths alleging pollution and deprivation of wealth demanded that oil company workers leave by Dec. 30, at which time clashes erupted between soldiers and protesters in Yenegoa, capital of the country's biggest oil-producing state, Bayelsa. "Between yesterday and today, about 12 people have died and the protests have continued.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An upsurge of trouble in Nigeria's oil-rich Niger Delta has been testing the new military rulers' tolerance of dissent, forcing them to deal with the aspirations of impoverished ethnic groups and further endangering an already weak economy. In the recent history of the world's sixth-largest oil producer, competing demands for the wealth generated by black gold often have made it seem more of curse than a blessing.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reuben Onyewikpe Loveday, a farmer in the depressed swamplands of the Niger River Delta, nostalgically remembers the days when he could make a healthy living off his three acres of land. Bountiful yields of yams, cassava and plantains and reliable catches from his fish pond used to guarantee him about $8,000 a year--a handsome sum in a country where the annual per capita income hovers around $320.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1995
Western Oil Firms Enter Nigeria Pact: Shell Oil Co. and other companies signed an agreement with the Nigerian military government to invest in a $3.5-billion natural gas plant. Shell said it will not stop investing in the West African nation, despite international condemnation of the regime after the executions of playwright Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other anti-government activists. Nigerian courts had convicted the activists in four killings.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to use his moral authority and global prestige, President Nelson Mandela said Wednesday that he will lead a campaign for an international oil embargo against the military regime in Nigeria in a push for immediate democratic reforms. Mandela is the first major political leader to call for such severe sanctions against the repressive rulers of Africa's most populous nation following the executions Friday of author Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other political activists.
NEWS
November 13, 1995 | From Reuters
An enraged international community Sunday heaped pressure on Nigeria for hanging nine minority-rights activists but ruled out oil sanctions as an immediate option against its military government. That exemption angered Nigerian human rights activists who argued that the oil industry is controlled by a tiny clique of people in power who are draining off national oil revenues for personal use.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the steamy Niger River delta, with thick mangrove swamps and chocolate-brown rivers stretching to the horizon, drilling supervisor Funsho Amoo shouts to be heard above the hissing steam, thumping machinery and groaning metal of a Shell oil rig. "This well produces 2,000 barrels a day," Amoo hollers beside a giant hoist that shudders and shrieks as it pushes pipe into the muck. "But something is damaged, so we are repairing the pipe."
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