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BUSINESS
March 8, 1985 | JANE APPLEGATE
As part of its new strategy to sell certain assets, Fluor Corp. announced Thursday it is selling its interests in 18 oil and gas production tracts in the Gulf of Mexico to Shell Offshore Inc., a subsidiary of the Shell Oil Co., for $80 million. The cash sale is expected to be completed before the end of Fluor's second quarter and will not result in any earnings gain or loss, the company said. Fluor retains an interest in 88 additional exploratory tracts in the Gulf of Mexico.
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NATIONAL
September 15, 2010 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The trucks came at night, ferrying load after load of oil-field waste from Alabama to the US Liquids disposal facility in this tiny south Louisiana settlement. For the oil company, it was an easy decision: Exxon's drilling and production waste was classified as hazardous under Alabama law. Its disposal there would cost about $100 a barrel. In Louisiana, however, the chemical waste could be dumped into open pits at a cost of $8 a barrel. The US Liquids plant is across a two-lane highway from Clarice Friloux's property, which backs up to an alligator-filled bayou.
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NEWS
October 10, 1988 | United Press International
Tenneco Inc. has reached agreement to sell substantially all segments of its Tenneco Oil Co. subsidiary for more than $7.3 billion, the company said today. Chevron Corp. said it would buy Tenneco's Gulf of Mexico oil and natural gas reserves, production facilities and leasehold interests for about $2.6 billion. Maverick Texas oilman T. Boone Pickens' Mesa Limited Partnership agreed to purchase Tenneco's Mid-Continent division for $715 million in cash, and Seagull Energy Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2010 | Steve Lopez
I don't mean to disturb your holiday weekend just when you're trying to scrub that grease off the barbecue grill. But I thought now was a good time to remind you that in two months, you'll have an important choice to make about the air you breathe. In November, you'll be asked whether California should continue on the path to becoming one of the world's environmental leaders. Or give up the good fight and pray that the global warming deniers are right. I'm talking about Proposition 23, which comes to us courtesy of some of the finest corporate citizens America has to offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992
What would it take for the Serbian leaders directing the Bosnia genocide to be referred to as the "Butchers of Baghdad"--oil interests? So much for "higher moral ground." EILEEN McDARGH, Laguna Niguel
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1990
A telling item in the Aug. 8 Times: The U.S. may agree to sell Saudi Arabia 40 F-15 fighters in a deal heretofore blocked through the efforts of lobbyists of the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee. Isn't it interesting how our policy toward a country suddenly changes when we need it? As America hurriedly seeks to forge a world consensus on Iraq's aggression in the Middle East, it wonders why Jordan is reluctant to join in the chorus of condemnation, and why Saudi Arabia is reluctant to accept our forces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1991
I would not mind the fighter-jet noise drowning out my TV at night or waking me in the middle of the night if I thought it was even remotely connected to the defense of our great country. However, the increased activity at the El Toro Marine base, whose fighters wantonly buzz our urban community around the clock, shows very little regard for the safety and security of our neighborhood. The noise also tells me that the flower of our youth is being trained to impose the will of our government around the world by naked military power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1985
The Reagan Administration's decision to relax standards on minimum fuel economy requirements exemplifies the hypocrisy of our national energy policy. In reality, the Reagan Administration serves the interests of the oil companies and the car manufacturers, particularly General Motors and Ford. In an attempt to justify changing his position on limiting offshore leasing, Secretary of the Interior Donald Hodel points out that the current oil glut is only temporary and we must continue drilling off of California's coast.
OPINION
December 2, 2001
Eric Margolis' Nov. 28 commentary proclaims that "Russia Checkmated Its New Best Friend," that is, U.S. global interests and, specifically, those in Central Asia. Margolis claims that Russia has presently achieved victory in Afghanistan through its proxy, the Northern Alliance, resulting in the U.S. and Pakistan being cut off from Central Asian resources, specifically the oil-rich Caspian Basin. These conclusions are based on unsupportable and unreasonable assumptions. The false premise is that Russian interests are diametrically opposite to those of the U.S. both globally and regionally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1987
Secretary of Interior Donald Paul Hodel (Letters, July 6) exhibits the duplicity typical of this Administration regarding conservation of the environment and of wildlife. Under him and his predecessors, our natural resources, our national parks and forests have been managed primarily as profit generators. The parks have been opened up and much of their wildlife destroyed for the benefit of commercial establishments. Billions of tax dollars have purchased access roads through national forests for the benefit of logging interests.
NATIONAL
June 23, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Federal judges in gulf states have been extensively invested in the oil and gas industries for decades, and those interests threaten to create a logjam for the 150-plus lawsuits and legal challenges prompted by the BP spill. Seven of the 12 federal judges of the Eastern District of Louisiana already have cited potential conflicts of interest in bowing out of cases brought by fishermen, charter operators, tourist services and families of those killed in the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico.
WORLD
September 1, 2009 | Henry Chu
Amid continued allegations of political deal-making, Scottish officials said today that the early release of the only man convicted in the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am jet over Scotland was motivated solely by humanitarian and judicial concerns, not commercial ones. British interests in Libya's large oil and gas reserves were irrelevant to the decision to release Abdel Basset Ali Megrahi, a suspected Libyan spy found guilty in 2001, said Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland's deputy first minister.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2006 | From Reuters
Top U.S. executives are concerned that rising oil prices and interest rates, as well as a possible easing in consumer spending, could bring slower economic growth, according to a pair of surveys released Wednesday. "There is no doubt that high energy prices, especially in the last several months, have posed a challenge to the economy and the nation's leading companies," said Hank McKinnell, chairman of the Business Roundtable and chief executive of drug maker Pfizer Inc.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2005 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
Opposing offshore drilling for oil and gas has traditionally been a bipartisan affair in Florida, where the $57-billion annual tourism industry is greatly dependent on unsullied, inviting beaches. But an announcement by Gov. Jeb Bush may signal the end of that political unity -- and a split in his own party. The Republican governor has endorsed a plan, part of a bill proposed by a California congressman that would allow, among other things, oil rigs 125 miles off the coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2002 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the objections of businesses and oil interests, an Assembly committee on Friday endorsed a bill requiring employees to report cases of fraud by their corporate bosses and imposing severe fines on executives for falsifying financial reports. The bill by Sen. Martha Escutia (D-Whittier) squeaked out of the Judiciary Committee with no votes to spare and was sent to the Appropriations Committee for further screening. Democrats voted for it, but Republicans refused to vote.
OPINION
December 2, 2001
Eric Margolis' Nov. 28 commentary proclaims that "Russia Checkmated Its New Best Friend," that is, U.S. global interests and, specifically, those in Central Asia. Margolis claims that Russia has presently achieved victory in Afghanistan through its proxy, the Northern Alliance, resulting in the U.S. and Pakistan being cut off from Central Asian resources, specifically the oil-rich Caspian Basin. These conclusions are based on unsupportable and unreasonable assumptions. The false premise is that Russian interests are diametrically opposite to those of the U.S. both globally and regionally.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2010 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The trucks came at night, ferrying load after load of oil-field waste from Alabama to the US Liquids disposal facility in this tiny south Louisiana settlement. For the oil company, it was an easy decision: Exxon's drilling and production waste was classified as hazardous under Alabama law. Its disposal there would cost about $100 a barrel. In Louisiana, however, the chemical waste could be dumped into open pits at a cost of $8 a barrel. The US Liquids plant is across a two-lane highway from Clarice Friloux's property, which backs up to an alligator-filled bayou.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan equated President George Bush with a "warlord" Saturday, saying that the "vital interest" and reason for the U.S. presence in the Middle East was oil. Farrakhan, speaking to reporters at a press conference in San Diego, said he hopes it is not "the intent of Mr. Bush and the warlords to destroy Saddam Hussein." The outspoken Chicago-based minister said the deployment of more than 50,000 U.S.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the United States and Russia have found some common ground on weapons control and international terrorism, Russian President Vladimir V. Putin mingled with cowboy capitalists Wednesday, seeking their investments and touting the two countries' shared interest in Russia's vast oil fields.
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