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Oil Paintings

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1987 | Lily Eng \f7
Two oil paintings worth $12,800 were stolen last week from an art gallery specializing in contemporary art, police said Monday. The impressionist-style artworks by Marco M. Sassone apparently were stolen sometime Jan. 11 or 12 from the Diane Sassone Art Gallery in Laguna Beach, but were not reported missing until Monday, Laguna Beach Police Sgt. Ray Lardie said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Allan M. Jalon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - "A snake swallowing an elephant" is how the Chinese artist Wu Guanzhong described himself. The snake was the Chinese artist in him, and the elephant was Western art. The stylistic fusion that made him one of China'sleading modern artists is on view at the Asia Society Museum here in "Revolutionary Ink: The Paintings of Wu Guanzhong," which also reflects the artist's long life amid the turmoil of China's 20th century. Wu died in 2010 at 90, and these works from his last decades - depicting nature and architecture, some more naturalistic, others mostly abstract - show his easy cohabitation of two cultural hemispheres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1985 | PATRICIA KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles police have served a search warrant on a Granada Hills home and seized more than 50 paintings, drawings and lithographs that an artist claims belong to him. The artist, Helmut Preiss, 44, formerly of Vienna, who now lives in West Hollywood, told authorities that the works were being illegally held by a man who had contracted to sell them but never paid him any money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2010
Johnny Sellers Hall of Fame jockey Johnny Sellers, 72, a hall of fame jockey who rode Carry Back to victory in the 1961 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, died Friday at a nursing home in Arkansas, his son Mark told the Daily Racing Form. A Los Angeles native who grew up in Oklahoma, Sellers also won the 1965 Belmont Stakes with Hail to All. He was the leading thoroughbred jockey in 1961 and finished his riding career in 1977 with 2,787 victories. Sellers later became a bloodstock agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Amid his pensive, engrossing paintings now at Roberts & Tilton, Noah Davis has planted something of a joke: a tight, U-shaped mini-exhibition space formed by temporary walls covered in scuffed gray fabric. Three small oil paintings hang within but are impossible to see well. "Stacked Cubicles/My Last Art Fair" offers an uncharacteristic moment of levity from Davis, a knowing poke at the crowded and often claustrophobic conditions of art fairs, a self-deprecating snicker at his allotted sliver of visibility.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2013 | By Richard Simon
The capital is full of portraits of government officials, sometimes more than one of the same person. Elliot Richardson has four - one for each department he headed in the 1970s, including the Defense Department, where he was secretary for just four months. Donald H. Rumsfeld has two on display at the Pentagon, one for each of his stints as Defense secretary. Scores of others - Cabinet members, congressional leaders, heads of agencies such as NASA and the National Science Foundation and military leaders - are immortalized in oil paintings, an enduring tradition that has become part of the nation's historical record.
BOOKS
November 15, 1987 | Kristiana Gregory
The day this book came in the mail, three adults monopolized it while our children begged for a look. "Just a sec," we kept saying. We were so captivated by the artwork that we stood in the kitchen staring at the pages, vaguely aware that the kids were in the next room catapulting off the furniture. Thomas Locker's oil paintings are worthy of all the synonyms of "superb," and it's certainly a temptation to list them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1990 | KIRSTEN LEE SWARTZ
More than 25 years ago, Roland Roy encountered one too many victims of violent crime. As a rookie cop on the Honolulu police force, Roy despised the violence and decided to switch to art after a picture he sketched of a murder suspect led to an arrest. Today, his paintings hang in galleries across the country and, this month, in a restaurant in Ventura to benefit victims of domestic abuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH
To hear Lee J. Wexler tell it, the art of watercolor painting has a slight image problem. Wexler, the president of the National Watercolor Society, believes the medium is often misunderstood or taken too lightly by the art community at large. Watercolors are invariably credited for their "evanescent, delicate beauty and demanding technique," but it can be a hollow compliment.
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