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Oil Pipelines Arctic

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NEWS
April 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six miles out on the polar ice pack--rising out of the silent, frozen sea--stands a 5-acre island and an army of backhoes gouging a massive trench into the ocean floor. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, workers race to complete the first undersea oil pipeline ever attempted in the formidable moonscape of the Arctic Ocean. Delay a few weeks and the ice supporting the heavy cranes will give way to the spring thaw. Hurry and the pipeline won't get buried properly.
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NEWS
April 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six miles out on the polar ice pack--rising out of the silent, frozen sea--stands a 5-acre island and an army of backhoes gouging a massive trench into the ocean floor. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, workers race to complete the first undersea oil pipeline ever attempted in the formidable moonscape of the Arctic Ocean. Delay a few weeks and the ice supporting the heavy cranes will give way to the spring thaw. Hurry and the pipeline won't get buried properly.
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OPINION
February 5, 2014
Re "The future of Keystone XL," Editorial, Feb. 4 The Times writes: "If developed nations had started earlier … oil pipelines and Arctic drilling rigs would hold little attraction. " Given no credit, Jimmy Carter did start early. He is responsible for federal standards to increase fuel efficiency, and he invested in green energy, putting solar panels on the White House. (Ronald Reagan promptly removed them.) Now, about that pipeline. Severe water shortages are inevitable in the next decade, as reservoirs and aquifers are quickly depleted.
OPINION
February 2, 2014
The State Department is probably right to conclude, as it did Friday, that the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline project would have a negligible effect on climate change. Even though the extraction of the oil would certainly cause significant pollution, Keystone XL would be only one of many dirty oil operations around the world. What's more, stopping the pipeline, which is expected to carry 83,000 barrels of oil each day 1,700 miles from the tar sands of Canada to the Gulf Coast, wouldn't stop the extraction.
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