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Oil Rigs

SPORTS
October 5, 1994 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The foot-long rockfish, reddish-brown with bulging black eyes, swam up to the bubble-blowing intruder and, face to face, shot him what seemed an angry glare. The diver flinched and the fish was gone, having darted into the safety of the reef. David O. Brown, and two associates from the underwater documentary team of the Santa Barbara-based Passage Productions, continued their narrated dive, the purpose of which was to show off the abundance of life at the foot of an oil platform called Hazel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite eloquent pleas from sport fishermen and divers, the State Lands Commission on Friday approved dismantling artificial Belmont Island off Seal Beach and moving its rock base to the state's Bolsa Chica Artificial Reef. Opponents had argued that the former oil production facility provides a reef-like habitat for scores of sea creatures. "I'm saddened to see the political process does not put together the science needed to see . . .
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | SALLY ANN CONNELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They seem unsinkable, these steel behemoths that could stand forever as marvels of 20th-century engineering. But offshore oil platforms have a life span. After the oil is gone, the question becomes what to do with the man-made islands. That issue is a hot topic as oil companies tussle with environmentalists and state lawmakers over the future of 40 undeveloped oil leases off California's Central Coast, some of the last undersea plots up for grabs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2001 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers aboard this vast, rumbling network of pipes and compressors call her an animal--a volatile creature with good days and bad. Her moods swing, her pressures shift and her lifeblood flows from black pools two miles below the sea floor. This is Platform Gail, one of the largest and most sophisticated offshore oil rigs in California--a small city sitting in almost 800 feet of ocean nine miles off the coast of Port Hueneme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1985
The editorial "Truce on Offshore Oil" (Aug. 12) should have been entitled "Arrogant Contempt for Public." Can The Times stand there and tell us we should be happy about the rottenness of our leaders and the hopeless caviling of our representatives? I would like to see how far the oil companies would get if they proposed offshore drilling on the French Riviera. They would have to flee for their lives. Well, this is our Riviera, and it is the jewel in the crown of California. If one oil well is drilled it's the same as 100. There is no difference.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
John H. Loudon, 90, head of the mammoth Anglo-Dutch oil company Royal Dutch/Shell Group for 14 years. Known as "the grand old man of Shell," Loudon was director general of the firm from 1951 until 1965 and won international admiration for steering Shell through the turbulent problems in the Middle East caused by the 1956 closing of the Suez Canal. He initiated executive training programs for local staff, retaining Shell's influence despite growing nationalism.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Environmental Writer
Under pressure from the U.S. Minerals Management Service, the Coast Guard has withdrawn a suggestion to create a five-mile-wide ocean corridor to allow growing numbers of ships to pass safely through oil and gas fields off the California coast earmarked for development. The MMS, the Interior Department agency that leases offshore oil and gas tracts in federal waters, objected that a five-mile-wide corridor would preclude the construction of drilling platforms in potentially rich oil and gas fields and cost the government billions of dollars in lost lease sales.
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