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BUSINESS
March 3, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Chevron Corp. said Thursday that it would spend billions of dollars to lead the development of a giant oil-sand project in Canada's Alberta province. Chevron, which also owns 20% of a nearby oil-sand development controlled by Royal Dutch Shell, plans to build and operate a project capable of producing more than 100,000 barrels of oil a day within 10 years, said James Bates, a vice president at the company's Canadian unit. San Ramon, Calif.
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OPINION
February 9, 2014
Re "The future of Keystone XL," Editorial, Feb. 2 TransCanada hasn't had a spill from our actual oil pipelines. The first Keystone pipeline has safely delivered more than 550 million barrels of oil to U.S. refineries. In 2011 we replaced some fittings at all of our pump stations after some releases occurred; there hasn't been an issue since. Most spills were just a few gallons, and most of the oil remained on our property and was cleaned up without an environmental impact The State Department's latest report reiterated that Keystone XL would be the safest pipeline ever built in the U.S. if TransCanada agreed to 59 additional conditions - and we have.
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WORLD
July 8, 2007 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
The Aurora Mine exudes the odor of petroleum and the look of untapped riches. The open pit mine plunges 250 feet deep and ranges over a couple of square miles, carved out of pine and spruce forest by gigantic machines that operate 24/7, even in the dark of winter at 40 below zero. This is the heart of Alberta's oil sands, a remote Florida-sized region where moose, bears and beavers inhabit watery woodlands atop the world's largest proven petroleum reserves outside Saudi Arabia.
WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
CONKLIN, Canada - Can the Keystone XL pipeline be built without significantly worsening greenhouse gas emissions and climate change? For President Obama, that is the main criterion for granting a federal permit to allow the pipeline to cross from southern Alberta into the United States. Canadian authorities and the oil industry say measures already in place or under consideration to cut greenhouse gases ensure that Keystone XL can pass that test. "We absolutely think we can maintain growth in oil and gas, and achieve greenhouse gas reductions," said Nicole Spears, a climate policy expert with Alberta's Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development.
WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
CONKLIN, Canada - Can the Keystone XL pipeline be built without significantly worsening greenhouse gas emissions and climate change? For President Obama, that is the main criterion for granting a federal permit to allow the pipeline to cross from southern Alberta into the United States. Canadian authorities and the oil industry say measures already in place or under consideration to cut greenhouse gases ensure that Keystone XL can pass that test. "We absolutely think we can maintain growth in oil and gas, and achieve greenhouse gas reductions," said Nicole Spears, a climate policy expert with Alberta's Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Resource Development.
OPINION
July 10, 2007
Re "Canada's black gold glimmers but tarnishes," July 8 Very few have benefited from the oil-sands development in Alberta. The main beneficiaries are oil companies (including those in the U.S.), the United States and the province of Alberta. The rest of Canada receives little from the oil sands. Meanwhile, Canadians watch helplessly as a major hole is being dug into an irreplaceable wilderness area. I've also noticed that U.S.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2009 | Associated Press
Suncor Energy Inc. plans to acquire Petro-Canada for $15.5 billion, uniting two of Canada's biggest oil companies as the nation's energy industry retrenches. If the deal announced Monday is approved, it would create the largest oil company in Canada, with a market capitalization of about $38 billion. That's much smaller than global heavyweights such as Exxon Mobil Corp. and ConocoPhillips, which boast market capitalizations of $326.6 billion and $55.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Paul Richter and Christi Parsons
The Obama administration is preparing to announce a delay in the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline project, according to an official who has been briefed on the plans. The announcement could come as early as Thursday, and would likely delay the politically charged project until after the 2012 presidential election. The State Department has been considering extending the permit process to allow a new assessment of the proposed route of the oil pipeline from Canada to Texas.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday criticized the State Department's environmental impact review of the Keystone XL pipeline, saying there was not enough evidence to back up key conclusions on gas emissions, safety and alternative routes. In a letter to top State Department officials, the agency said it had "environmental objections" to their review, which concluded the pipeline would have minimal impact on the environment. The analysis could complicate efforts to win approval for the controversial $7-billion project.
WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - A new study has detected air pollutants, including carcinogens, in areas downwind of Canada's main fossil fuel hub in Alberta at levels rivaling those of major metropolises such as Beijing and Mexico City. The study by researchers from UC Irvine and the University of Michigan also found a high incidence of blood cancers such as leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among men in the area, compared with the rest of Alberta and Canada. "When you get cancers that can be caused by the carcinogens we are seeing, that is reason for concern," said Isobel J. Simpson, a lead author of the study and a researcher at UC Irvine's chemistry department.
WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - A new study has detected air pollutants, including carcinogens, in areas downwind of Canada's main fossil fuel hub in Alberta at levels rivaling those of major metropolises such as Beijing and Mexico City. The study by researchers from UC Irvine and the University of Michigan also found a high incidence of blood cancers such as leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among men in the area, compared with the rest of Alberta and Canada. "When you get cancers that can be caused by the carcinogens we are seeing, that is reason for concern," said Isobel J. Simpson, a lead author of the study and a researcher at UC Irvine's chemistry department.
WORLD
October 21, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
FORT CHIPEWYAN, Canada - In the Cree language, the word "athabasca" means "a place where grass is everywhere. " Here in Alberta, the Athabasca River slices through forests of spruce and birch before spilling into a vast freshwater delta and Lake Athabasca. But 100 miles upstream, the boreal forest has been peeled back by enormous strip mines, where massive shovels pick up 100 tons of earth at a time and dump it into yellow trucks as big as houses. The tarry bitumen that is extracted is eventually shipped to refineries, many in the United States, to be processed into gasoline, diesel and other fuels.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
SEATTLE - On a narrow central Idaho highway coursing through thickets of ponderosa pines and along a winding river, members of the Nez Perce tribe made their stand. Hundreds gathered along U.S. Highway 12 on Monday and Tuesday and formed a human blockade in an attempt to stop a controversial megaload of equipment bound for the oil tar sands of Alberta, Canada - a load reportedly weighing about 644,000 pounds and stretching over 200 feet. They intended on continuing their protests Wednesday and Thursday nights.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday criticized the State Department's environmental impact review of the Keystone XL pipeline, saying there was not enough evidence to back up key conclusions on gas emissions, safety and alternative routes. In a letter to top State Department officials, the agency said it had "environmental objections" to their review, which concluded the pipeline would have minimal impact on the environment. The analysis could complicate efforts to win approval for the controversial $7-billion project.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
This year President Obama will decide whether to allow construction of the Keystone XL pipeline from Alberta, Canada, to the Gulf of Mexico. Few environmental issues in recent years have engendered so much passion and debate. The pipeline would facilitate the transportation of a particularly thick type of oil, oil sands crude, from Canada to U.S. ports. What is oil sands crude? It is a tar-like substance containing bitumen, extracted from the boreal forests of western Canada by strip mining.
OPINION
April 4, 2013 | By James Hansen
In March, the State Department gave the president cover to open a big spigot that will hitch our country to one of the dirtiest fuels on Earth for 40 years or more. The draft environmental review of the Keystone XL pipeline acknowledges tar sands are nasty stuff for the environment, but concludes that the project is OK because this oil will get to market anyway - with or without a pipeline. A public comment period is underway through April 22, after which the department will prepare a final statement to help the administration decide whether the pipeline is in the "national interest.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
EDMONTON, Canada - With a daughter to feed, no job and $200 in the bank, Detroit pipe fitter Scott Zarembski boarded a plane on a one-way ticket to this industrial capital city. He'd heard there was work in western Canada. Turns out he'd heard right. Within days he was wearing a hard hat at a Shell oil refinery 15 miles away in Fort Saskatchewan. Within six months he had earned almost $50,000. That was 2009. And he's still there. "If you want to work, you can work," said Zarembski, 45. "And it's just getting started.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A long-awaited State Department review of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline released Friday concludes that he project would have minimal impact on the environment, increasing the chances it could be approved in the coming months. The State Department underscored that the study, a supplemental environmental impact statement, is a draft and that it does not offer recommendations for action on the $7-billion project, which would bring petroleum from the oil sands of Alberta, Canada, to refineries on the Gulf Coast of Texas.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A long-awaited State Department review of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline released Friday concludes that he project would have minimal impact on the environment, increasing the chances it could be approved in the coming months. The State Department underscored that the study, a supplemental environmental impact statement, is a draft and that it does not offer recommendations for action on the $7-billion project, which would bring petroleum from the oil sands of Alberta, Canada, to refineries on the Gulf Coast of Texas.
OPINION
December 13, 2012
"Dilbit" - drop the word in casual conversation and listeners might think you're talking about the comic strip engineer who can't get a date. But dilbit actually stands for "diluted bitumen," a heretofore obscure oil industry term that may soon be trending on your search engine as controversy deepens over the Keystone XL pipeline, a project to carry oil from the Alberta tar sands to refineries in Texas that has become the nation's most contentious battle between conservative fossil fuel backers and liberal environmentalists.
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