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Oil Spills Japan

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NEWS
February 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Families of people who died while cleaning up spilled oil off Japan's west coast will each receive about $8,200 in compensation, the government said. The announcement came soon after reports of a fifth death that may be related to cleanup efforts--a 68-year-old heart attack victim who died after a full day cleaning up the oil. Thousands of fishermen, firefighters and others are helping the coast guard clean up an estimated 1.
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NEWS
July 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
A supertanker gashed its hull near Japan's busiest port Wednesday and dumped about 390,000 gallons of light crude that drifted toward rich fishing grounds. By early today, the 11-mile-wide slick had reached land in three places along the industrial shoreline of Yokohama and Kawasaki just south of Tokyo. More than a dozen people--mostly children--were sickened by the fumes.
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NEWS
February 1, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even atop the black, craggy cliffs that loom 250 feet above the thrashing Japan Sea, through heavy wind and lashing snow, the stench of oil here is piercing. "I can smell the oil on my own breath," said Yoshinobu Nishi, 55, a fisherman. "Come summer, I bet this beach will really stink." Nishi and his neighbors spent four days scraping noxious goop from the rocks of a wild and lovely but now oil-coated bay on the Noto Peninsula, an isolated, scenic hump on the back of western Japan.
NEWS
February 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Families of people who died while cleaning up spilled oil off Japan's west coast will each receive about $8,200 in compensation, the government said. The announcement came soon after reports of a fifth death that may be related to cleanup efforts--a 68-year-old heart attack victim who died after a full day cleaning up the oil. Thousands of fishermen, firefighters and others are helping the coast guard clean up an estimated 1.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | From Associated Press
An oil spill affecting hundreds of miles of scenic Japanese shoreline drifted toward seaside nuclear power plants Friday, threatening to clog vital cooling systems. Coast guard and fishing ships rushed to set up a boom around parts of the spill near the entrance to Wakasa Bay to keep the oil from the power plants ringing the bay. Officials of Kansai Electric Power Co.
NEWS
January 9, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Braving howling winds and sleet, the weathered fishermen and women of this picturesque town on the remote underbelly of Japan's western coast on Wednesday pondered a future as black as the oily slop despoiling their sea. "We fishermen are going to die," declared Akira Shimizu, 62, as he and others scooped out buckets of fuel oil leaked from a Russian tanker that broke in two and partially ran aground last week. "We can't make money off this polluted stuff. Who can we complain to?"
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
A supertanker gashed its hull near Japan's busiest port Wednesday and dumped about 390,000 gallons of light crude that drifted toward rich fishing grounds. By early today, the 11-mile-wide slick had reached land in three places along the industrial shoreline of Yokohama and Kawasaki just south of Tokyo. More than a dozen people--mostly children--were sickened by the fumes.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The battle against one of Japan's worst oil spills grew more difficult as massive new slicks whipped by heavy winds quadrupled the coastline affected. Strong winds, high waves and poor visibility along much of the rugged coastline continued to hamper cleanup efforts. So far, the western prefectures of Hyogo, Kyoto, Fukui and Ishikawa have been affected by the 962,000-gallon leak caused by the breakup of a Russian tanker carrying fuel oil.
NEWS
April 12, 1990
A cargo ship crashed into the side of an oil tanker in western Japan on Wednesday and caused a two-mile-long oil spill, a Maritime Safety Agency official said. The 499-ton freighter Sumiryu Maru smashed into the 121-ton No. 10 Waei Maru, which was refueling a ferry in Osaka Bay, the official said. The amount of oil leaked was not immediately available.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even atop the black, craggy cliffs that loom 250 feet above the thrashing Japan Sea, through heavy wind and lashing snow, the stench of oil here is piercing. "I can smell the oil on my own breath," said Yoshinobu Nishi, 55, a fisherman. "Come summer, I bet this beach will really stink." Nishi and his neighbors spent four days scraping noxious goop from the rocks of a wild and lovely but now oil-coated bay on the Noto Peninsula, an isolated, scenic hump on the back of western Japan.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | From Associated Press
An oil spill affecting hundreds of miles of scenic Japanese shoreline drifted toward seaside nuclear power plants Friday, threatening to clog vital cooling systems. Coast guard and fishing ships rushed to set up a boom around parts of the spill near the entrance to Wakasa Bay to keep the oil from the power plants ringing the bay. Officials of Kansai Electric Power Co.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The battle against one of Japan's worst oil spills grew more difficult as massive new slicks whipped by heavy winds quadrupled the coastline affected. Strong winds, high waves and poor visibility along much of the rugged coastline continued to hamper cleanup efforts. So far, the western prefectures of Hyogo, Kyoto, Fukui and Ishikawa have been affected by the 962,000-gallon leak caused by the breakup of a Russian tanker carrying fuel oil.
NEWS
January 9, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Braving howling winds and sleet, the weathered fishermen and women of this picturesque town on the remote underbelly of Japan's western coast on Wednesday pondered a future as black as the oily slop despoiling their sea. "We fishermen are going to die," declared Akira Shimizu, 62, as he and others scooped out buckets of fuel oil leaked from a Russian tanker that broke in two and partially ran aground last week. "We can't make money off this polluted stuff. Who can we complain to?"
NEWS
April 12, 1990
A cargo ship crashed into the side of an oil tanker in western Japan on Wednesday and caused a two-mile-long oil spill, a Maritime Safety Agency official said. The 499-ton freighter Sumiryu Maru smashed into the 121-ton No. 10 Waei Maru, which was refueling a ferry in Osaka Bay, the official said. The amount of oil leaked was not immediately available.
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