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Oil Spills New York City

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NEWS
February 17, 1990 | United Press International
New Jersey Gov. Jim Florio and New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo announced plans Friday for a joint study of the damage done by the Exxon oil spill in the Arthur Kill and said Exxon would pay the cost of $660,000. The two governors said their states, New York City, other local governments and the federal Environmental Protection Agency would pool their resources to conduct the study. Exxon will be required to reimburse the government agencies for their costs.
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NEWS
July 11, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mobil Oil Corp. has agreed to clean up a more than four-decade-long seepage that has left about 17 million gallons of oil--6 million more than flowed from the Exxon Valdez--under the streets of New York City. The pool is the result of cumulative oozing from a collection of storage tanks and pipelines alongside a creek in Brooklyn's Greenpoint section, a heavily industrialized neighborhood within sight of the skyscrapers of Manhattan.
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NEWS
December 16, 1989 | United Press International
A barge leaked about 120,000 gallons of fuel oil into New York Bay Friday and patches of it blackened the city shoreline.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Corp. suspended all tanker and barge operations at its massive Bayway Refinery and Bayonne Terminal pending an investigation into the second major oil spill in three months in a busy waterway separating New York and New Jersey. Cleanup crews finished mopping up a spill of 3,500 gallons of heavy oil into the Arthur Kill waterway, and Capt. Robert North, Coast Guard captain of the Port of New York, reported there was "no free-floating oil seen anywhere in the harbor or in Arthur Kill."
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mobil Oil Corp. has agreed to clean up a more than four-decade-long seepage that has left about 17 million gallons of oil--6 million more than flowed from the Exxon Valdez--under the streets of New York City. The pool is the result of cumulative oozing from a collection of storage tanks and pipelines alongside a creek in Brooklyn's Greenpoint section, a heavily industrialized neighborhood within sight of the skyscrapers of Manhattan.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A 300-foot-long barge loaded with 3.1 million gallons of gasoline ran aground on rocks in New York's harbor late Wednesday, spilling hundreds of thousands of gallons of gasoline into the East River flowing alongside some of Manhattan's most densely populated neighborhoods. Firefighters, fearing a spark could touch off major explosions, closed a nearby railroad bridge and a major section of the Triborough Bridge, a main commuter roadway.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and LISA ROMAINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a result of what is being called a "mini-Alaska," Exxon Corp. will have to pay millions of dollars in cleanup costs for allowing a half-million gallons of fuel oil to spill from a pipeline into a busy waterway between New York and New Jersey. The incident was the worst spill to hit the New York metropolitan area in two decades, and as the cleanup continues almost two weeks later, the stench of fuel oil still lingers in the area.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Corp. suspended all tanker and barge operations at its massive Bayway Refinery and Bayonne Terminal pending an investigation into the second major oil spill in three months in a busy waterway separating New York and New Jersey. Cleanup crews finished mopping up a spill of 3,500 gallons of heavy oil into the Arthur Kill waterway, and Capt. Robert North, Coast Guard captain of the Port of New York, reported there was "no free-floating oil seen anywhere in the harbor or in Arthur Kill."
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
About 27,000 gallons of heating oil spilled into a busy waterway Wednesday a few miles from the Statue of Liberty when the fuel was loaded onto a leaking barge at an Exxon Corp. terminal, the Coast Guard said. Exxon offered to help the Coast Guard clean up the spill but said the barge was not an Exxon vessel. The No.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
About 27,000 gallons of heating oil spilled into a busy waterway Wednesday a few miles from the Statue of Liberty when the fuel was loaded onto a leaking barge at an Exxon Corp. terminal, the Coast Guard said. Exxon offered to help the Coast Guard clean up the spill but said the barge was not an Exxon vessel. The No.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | United Press International
New Jersey Gov. Jim Florio and New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo announced plans Friday for a joint study of the damage done by the Exxon oil spill in the Arthur Kill and said Exxon would pay the cost of $660,000. The two governors said their states, New York City, other local governments and the federal Environmental Protection Agency would pool their resources to conduct the study. Exxon will be required to reimburse the government agencies for their costs.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | KAREN TUMULTY and LISA ROMAINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a result of what is being called a "mini-Alaska," Exxon Corp. will have to pay millions of dollars in cleanup costs for allowing a half-million gallons of fuel oil to spill from a pipeline into a busy waterway between New York and New Jersey. The incident was the worst spill to hit the New York metropolitan area in two decades, and as the cleanup continues almost two weeks later, the stench of fuel oil still lingers in the area.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | United Press International
A barge leaked about 120,000 gallons of fuel oil into New York Bay Friday and patches of it blackened the city shoreline.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A 300-foot-long barge loaded with 3.1 million gallons of gasoline ran aground on rocks in New York's harbor late Wednesday, spilling hundreds of thousands of gallons of gasoline into the East River flowing alongside some of Manhattan's most densely populated neighborhoods. Firefighters, fearing a spark could touch off major explosions, closed a nearby railroad bridge and a major section of the Triborough Bridge, a main commuter roadway.
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