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Oil Spills Santa Barbara County

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NEWS
October 1, 1997 | SCOTT STEEPLETON and FRANK CLIFFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A team of veterinarians and wildlife experts worked Tuesday to treat at least 24 oil-soaked seabirds while, offshore, hundreds of Coast Guard and oil industry personnel sought to contain the spread of the 2-day-old spill from a pipeline in the Santa Barbara Channel. Estimated at 200 to 500 barrels, the spilled oil has been washing ashore along a five-mile stretch of beach near the mouth of the Santa Ynez River on the Air Force base.
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NEWS
January 28, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was at a strand of California beach in the little resort town of Summerland that the search for oil broke free of the land and plunged into the sea. Lured by discoveries of crude in Ojai and Los Angeles, the wildcatters came west and threw up hundreds of derricks on the hills and streets of the hamlet east of Santa Barbara. Driven by ingenuity and greed, oilmen a century ago marched the derricks right into the surf like towering wooden soldiers, opening the oceans to petroleum prospecting.
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NEWS
February 14, 1990 | MAURA DOLAN and LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS
For reasons ranging from Mother Nature to Orange County's dense human population, the Huntington Beach oil spill is not expected to go down in history as one of the nation's major environmental disasters. Even if more oil had spilled, the ecological consequences of such an accident near an already developed shoreline would be less dire than the effects of a similar spill in a pristine and remote region such as Alaska.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | SCOTT STEEPLETON and FRANK CLIFFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A team of veterinarians and wildlife experts worked Tuesday to treat at least 24 oil-soaked seabirds while, offshore, hundreds of Coast Guard and oil industry personnel sought to contain the spread of the 2-day-old spill from a pipeline in the Santa Barbara Channel. Estimated at 200 to 500 barrels, the spilled oil has been washing ashore along a five-mile stretch of beach near the mouth of the Santa Ynez River on the Air Force base.
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was at a strand of California beach in the little resort town of Summerland that the search for oil broke free of the land and plunged into the sea. Lured by discoveries of crude in Ojai and Los Angeles, the wildcatters came west and threw up hundreds of derricks on the hills and streets of the hamlet east of Santa Barbara. Driven by ingenuity and greed, oilmen a century ago marched the derricks right into the surf like towering wooden soldiers, opening the oceans to petroleum prospecting.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alarm went out Wednesday just shy of dawn as oil company workers dumped 15 tons of rice hulls into the choppy Santa Barbara channel to simulate a 105,000-gallon oil spill. Within two hours, oil cleanup crews were dispatched out of Santa Barbara and Port Hueneme harbors to corral the mock slick--made of biodegradable rice hulls--and to learn whether they have what it takes to tackle the real thing. Oil spill specialists, environmental officials and the U.S.
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
An estimated 2,000 gallons of crude oil spilled Thursday morning from an Exxon Co. oil platform in the Santa Barbara Channel, fouling a 20-mile stretch of offshore waters. Cleanup crews dispatched by Exxon set up booms that seemed to contain the slick, and skimmers are sucking up the oil under the oversight of the Coast Guard and state officials.
NEWS
May 3, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
An estimated 2,000 gallons of crude oil spilled Thursday morning from an Exxon Co. oil platform in the Santa Barbara Channel, fouling a 20-mile stretch of offshore waters. Cleanup crews dispatched by Exxon set up booms that seemed to contain the slick, and skimmers are sucking up the oil under the oversight of the Coast Guard and state officials.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The alarm went out Wednesday just shy of dawn as oil company workers dumped 15 tons of rice hulls into the choppy Santa Barbara channel to simulate a 105,000-gallon oil spill. Within two hours, oil cleanup crews were dispatched out of Santa Barbara and Port Hueneme harbors to corral the mock slick--made of biodegradable rice hulls--and to learn whether they have what it takes to tackle the real thing. Oil spill specialists, environmental officials and the U.S.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | MAURA DOLAN and LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS
For reasons ranging from Mother Nature to Orange County's dense human population, the Huntington Beach oil spill is not expected to go down in history as one of the nation's major environmental disasters. Even if more oil had spilled, the ecological consequences of such an accident near an already developed shoreline would be less dire than the effects of a similar spill in a pristine and remote region such as Alaska.
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