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Oil Spills Texas

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NEWS
June 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Microbes began eating their way through an oil slick Friday as officials counted on an experimental method to help with the cleanup from the wrecked Norwegian tanker Mega Borg. "If it works in the sea like it works in (the) laboratory, we're going to solve the problem of oil spills in this country," said Texas Land Commissioner Garry Mauro, who has promoted the use of microbes. However, the concept is receiving mixed reviews in the scientific community.
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NEWS
May 28, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The company responsible for an oil slick that workers contained in Galveston Bay has a history of trouble with barges buckling and breaking open. The Buffalo 286, owned by Buffalo Marine Service Inc., dumped thousands of gallons of oil in the Houston Ship Channel before limping into a port five miles away. On March 18, a barge belonging to the same firm buckled and spilled more than 5,000 barrels of fuel oil into Galveston Bay.
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NEWS
March 19, 1996 | Associated Press
A barge carrying 714,000 gallons of crude oil broke open Monday just outside the Houston Ship Channel, spilling a ribbon of oil at least 5 miles long into Galveston Bay. The heavy intermediate fuel oil began streaming from the Buffalo Marine Service Inc. barge into an area between Pelican Island and Bolivar Peninsula about 1 p.m., the Coast Guard said. By late evening, the current had pulled the oil south along the coast.
NEWS
March 19, 1996 | Associated Press
A barge carrying 714,000 gallons of crude oil broke open Monday just outside the Houston Ship Channel, spilling a ribbon of oil at least 5 miles long into Galveston Bay. The heavy intermediate fuel oil began streaming from the Buffalo Marine Service Inc. barge into an area between Pelican Island and Bolivar Peninsula about 1 p.m., the Coast Guard said. By late evening, the current had pulled the oil south along the coast.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | United Press International
A 538-foot Norwegian tanker lost power and collided with a tugboat and two barges, dumping more than 100,000 gallons of light crude oil into Houston's ship channel, officials said. The crash occurred late Friday 3 1/2 miles east of Texas City, piercing the hull of one of the barges and spilling the oil into the water, said Petty Officer Mike Sams of the Coast Guard's Marine Safety Office in Galveston.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | From United Press International
Gov. Bill Clements declared Galveston Bay a disaster area Wednesday as crews worked to clean up the 500,000 gallons of spilled heavy oil that threatened commercial fishing grounds and sensitive marshlands. The No. 2 fuel oil spilled Saturday from one of three barges that collided with a Greek tanker, and by Wednesday the slick covered a 17-mile-wide area and was washing up on shore.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | Associated Press
A spill of 5.1 million gallons of oil in the Gulf of Mexico from a burning Norwegian tanker in 1990 caused virtually no long-term environmental damage, a study says. The spill from the Mega Borg created a 30-mile slick, but less than 125 gallons washed ashore, the Texas Water Commission reported Wednesday. It credited a quick response to the spill and favorable weather conditions.
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Shifting winds pushed an oil slick from the supertanker Mega Borg northeastward Sunday, buying officials a little more time to prepare for when it reaches shore, the Coast Guard said. Officials alerted communities north of Galveston to Louisiana that the tar balls may not be far away. They predicted late Sunday that tar balls from the spill would hit land Tuesday.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Workers using skimmers and absorbent pads mopped up sections of a 40,000-gallon oil spill but said it still threatened a wildlife habitat along Galveston Bay. A 10-mile stretch of the Gulf Coast Intracoastal Waterway remained closed as well. A 10-inch pipeline ruptured before midnight Thursday when Amoco Pipeline Co. workers were transferring light crude oil to a barge at the company's High Island terminal in Galveston's east bay, a company spokesman said.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A 50,000-gallon, five-mile-long slick of oil from two damaged barges in Galveston Bay was moving away from shore as cleanup crews worked to deflect it from environmentally sensitive waterfowl habitats, the Coast Guard said. Other vessels were backed up in the Houston Ship Channel, closed since the barges collided Saturday with the Liberian tanker Shinoussa.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After days of flood and fire, traffic moved through the Houston Ship Channel and crews said they were ahead of schedule in their efforts to clean up 200,000 gallons of spilled fuel and oil. The channel was closed last week because of flooding caused by torrential rains. It has been reopened since waters began receding and a sunken tugboat was removed from near the mouth of the San Jacinto River.
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | from Associated Press
Gooey crude oil and gasoline, some of it burning, stretched 20 miles down the flood-swollen San Jacinto River, keeping cleanup crews busy Saturday but hopeful of avoiding serious environmental damage. "It's a lot of nasty stuff," said Coast Guard Capt. Richard Ford, coordinator of the cleanup. "I am really hopeful that we will collect a lot of oil there today and we will see a substantial improvement in the next 24 hours.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | Associated Press
A spill of 5.1 million gallons of oil in the Gulf of Mexico from a burning Norwegian tanker in 1990 caused virtually no long-term environmental damage, a study says. The spill from the Mega Borg created a 30-mile slick, but less than 125 gallons washed ashore, the Texas Water Commission reported Wednesday. It credited a quick response to the spill and favorable weather conditions.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Workers using skimmers and absorbent pads mopped up sections of a 40,000-gallon oil spill but said it still threatened a wildlife habitat along Galveston Bay. A 10-mile stretch of the Gulf Coast Intracoastal Waterway remained closed as well. A 10-inch pipeline ruptured before midnight Thursday when Amoco Pipeline Co. workers were transferring light crude oil to a barge at the company's High Island terminal in Galveston's east bay, a company spokesman said.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | Associated Press
More than 40,000 gallons of crude oil spilled from an Amoco Pipeline Co. barge loading facility, and 4,200 gallons seeped into the intracoastal canal before it was contained, Amoco officials said Friday. Amoco spokesman Jim O'Leary said a line failed while workers were loading a barge around midnight Thursday, causing about 1,000 barrels, or 42,000 gallons, to escape. When workers noticed a drop in line pressure, they shut off the flow, he said.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | United Press International
A 538-foot Norwegian tanker lost power and collided with a tugboat and two barges, dumping more than 100,000 gallons of light crude oil into Houston's ship channel, officials said. The crash occurred late Friday 3 1/2 miles east of Texas City, piercing the hull of one of the barges and spilling the oil into the water, said Petty Officer Mike Sams of the Coast Guard's Marine Safety Office in Galveston.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For three tense days, many feared that the crippled Norwegian tanker Mega Borg could leave a wake of oil three times larger than last year's 11-million-gallon Exxon Valdez spill. Now those fears are easing, but the political fallout is just beginning. From the Galveston City Council to environmentalists in Washington, the Mega Borg explosion has added yet more fuel to the controversy over offshore oil operations and development.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Galveston Bay reopened to fishing Saturday, a week after a tanker-barge collision in the environmentally sensitive waterway that authorities now concede spilled far more oil than previously thought. The state health department declared the entire bay open for taking of fin fish but, concerned about the continuing effects of the spill, maintained a ban on shellfish harvesting across much of the bay.
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