Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOil Spills Washington State
IN THE NEWS

Oil Spills Washington State

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Settlements Reached in Northwest Oil Spills: Texaco Refining & Marketing Inc. and U.S. Oil & Refining Co. will pay a total of $14.7 million in penalties and cleanup costs for separate oil spills in Washington state, the Justice Department said. The agreements are the first judicial settlements to be reached under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which was passed after the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March, 1989.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Settlements Reached in Northwest Oil Spills: Texaco Refining & Marketing Inc. and U.S. Oil & Refining Co. will pay a total of $14.7 million in penalties and cleanup costs for separate oil spills in Washington state, the Justice Department said. The agreements are the first judicial settlements to be reached under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which was passed after the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March, 1989.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | Associated Press
Crews on land and at sea worked Saturday to clean up nearly 50,000 gallons of crude oil that spilled onto the ground and into Fidalgo Bay after the blowout of a pump at a refinery. The spilled oil flowed along railroad tracks a few hundred yards and through a culvert, said Lee Reagin, the Texaco refinery's supervisor of human resources. The Coast Guard reported about 3,100 gallons entered Fidalgo Bay, about 80 miles north of Seattle.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crews set up equipment to trap fuel leaking from a Japanese ship that sank in about 500 feet of water 25 miles off the northwest tip of Washington state. The oozing oil formed an 80-mile slick fouling pristine Pacific Northwest beaches, killing sea birds and depositing tar balls on the shore, officials said. Boats towing 600-foot-long booms will collect the slick in a smaller area so skimmers can lap it up, a U.S. Coast Guard spokesman said.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | Reuters
More than 400 birds, including two bald eagles, and three sea otters were mired in oil Monday as Canadian authorities commissioned a submarine to see if the leak from a sunken Japanese ship could be controlled. The birds, mostly murres, were recovered by rescue workers; 139 of them were dead, but the bald eagles and 302 others survived and may be saved.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Waves of frothy oil from a sunken Japanese fishing vessel have begun washing ashore on some of America's most pristine shores, threatening sea otters and tens of thousands of birds, Coast Guard officials said Saturday. More than a dozen oil-drenched birds, both dead and alive, have been found on beaches, said state Department of Wildlife spokesman Doug Zimmer. "They're so coated," Lorraine Durick, a volunteer with the Wild Animal Clinic of Monroe told the Seattle Times. "This stuff is like glue.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crews set up equipment to trap fuel leaking from a Japanese ship that sank in about 500 feet of water 25 miles off the northwest tip of Washington state. The oozing oil formed an 80-mile slick fouling pristine Pacific Northwest beaches, killing sea birds and depositing tar balls on the shore, officials said. Boats towing 600-foot-long booms will collect the slick in a smaller area so skimmers can lap it up, a U.S. Coast Guard spokesman said.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews scrambled to a contaminated beach in Olympic National Park as oil from a sunken Japanese ship continued to slosh ashore, threatening thousands of sea birds and mammals. Globs of oil mixed with kelp began washing ashore four days after the Tenyo Maru collided with another ship and sank off Washington's northwest tip.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | Reuters
More than 400 birds, including two bald eagles, and three sea otters were mired in oil Monday as Canadian authorities commissioned a submarine to see if the leak from a sunken Japanese ship could be controlled. The birds, mostly murres, were recovered by rescue workers; 139 of them were dead, but the bald eagles and 302 others survived and may be saved.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews scrambled to a contaminated beach in Olympic National Park as oil from a sunken Japanese ship continued to slosh ashore, threatening thousands of sea birds and mammals. Globs of oil mixed with kelp began washing ashore four days after the Tenyo Maru collided with another ship and sank off Washington's northwest tip.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Waves of frothy oil from a sunken Japanese fishing vessel have begun washing ashore on some of America's most pristine shores, threatening sea otters and tens of thousands of birds, Coast Guard officials said Saturday. More than a dozen oil-drenched birds, both dead and alive, have been found on beaches, said state Department of Wildlife spokesman Doug Zimmer. "They're so coated," Lorraine Durick, a volunteer with the Wild Animal Clinic of Monroe told the Seattle Times. "This stuff is like glue.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | Associated Press
Crews on land and at sea worked Saturday to clean up nearly 50,000 gallons of crude oil that spilled onto the ground and into Fidalgo Bay after the blowout of a pump at a refinery. The spilled oil flowed along railroad tracks a few hundred yards and through a culvert, said Lee Reagin, the Texaco refinery's supervisor of human resources. The Coast Guard reported about 3,100 gallons entered Fidalgo Bay, about 80 miles north of Seattle.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|