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BUSINESS
July 4, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wyle Electronics Inc., a major semiconductor and computer parts distributor and one of Orange County's largest companies, said Thursday it has agreed to be acquired by the giant German industrial concern Veba AG for $810 million in cash. The deal was portrayed as a strategic move that would create an electronics distribution powerhouse with global reach and sales of about $3 billion annually.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 1985 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
State utility regulators on Friday adopted long-awaited regulations that allow natural gas utilities to haul gas for large industrial customers beginning Jan. 1. The new regulations are designed to help utilities compete with interstate pipeline companies that want to capture a big chunk of the lucrative California natural gas market. Currently, utilities act only as middlemen, buying gas from natural gas producers and selling it to consumers.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2005 | Melinda Fulmer, Times Staff Writer
Helped by strong sales of "Star Wars" merchandise, toy maker Hasbro Inc. reported a 56% jump in second-quarter profit Monday while rival Mattel Inc. posted disappointing results as costs rose and its Barbie franchise continued to sputter. It was the seventh straight quarter of sliding sales for Mattel's largest product line. A makeover last year designed to make the blond icon more appealing to older girls hasn't stemmed the downturn.
OPINION
May 1, 2007
Re "Is 86 cents a ride really too much?" Opinion, April 27 Roger Snoble, the chief executive officer of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, asserts that county taxpayers have been heavily subsidizing Metro riders. I'm skeptical. This statement ignores many of the indirect costs of individual car use, leaving us with a faulty picture of who's really being subsidized. If we take into account the costs of lack of parking availability, traffic congestion and. most important, air pollution illnesses and global warming, the equation starts to look a little different.
OPINION
October 19, 2002
Thank you for "Clean Air Is the State's Right" (editorial, Oct. 14). We have been fighting the big auto manufacturers on this very issue for years. Our electric car has over 6,500 miles on it after about nine months of use. Clean, reliable, zero-emissions, one-penny-each, charge-at-home, no-visits-to-the-gas-station miles -- consuming no oil, Iraqi or otherwise. People give us the thumbs-up on the road, smile or wave. When was the last time that happened to an SUV driver? I think they're more used to a different type of gesture.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
The National Transportation Safety Board reported Thursday that the captain of the Exxon Valdez was legally drunk when he was tested some 10 hours after his tanker hit a reef last week, causing the worst oil spill in U.S. history. After the NTSB's announcement, Exxon officials confirmed that they had fired the captain, 42-year-old Joseph Hazelwood, although investigators could not determine whether he had been drinking on the job.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Two Kuwaiti petroleum tankers were reborn as American ships without fanfare Tuesday as three U.S. Navy vessels hovered protectively nearby to escort them through the Persian Gulf to Kuwait. The American flag was hoisted in brief ceremonies aboard the 401,000-ton Al Rekkah, one of the world's largest supertankers, which then formally became known as the Bridgeton, and the smaller Gas Minagish, which became the Gas Prince.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1998 | WALTER HAMILTON
With Asia-related profit worries causing heartburn up and down Wall Street, what's it take for a stock to go up these days? In a nutshell, earnings consistency. Despite the market's partial rebound Tuesday, stock prices are likely to remain under pressure in coming weeks until Wall Street gets a handle on the extent of profit damage caused by Asia.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Wal-Mart has been coming under a lot of fire lately. Two of its suppliers were found to have been making goods in a factory where 112 people died in Bangladesh , and employees throughout the country walked out of the store on one of the busiest retail days of the year to protest bad working conditions. But the company, never a crowd favorite at worker-solidarity gatherings, may be trying to improve its image. In a speech to the National Retail Federation in New York on Tuesday, Chief Executive Bill Simon said the company would hire any returning veteran who wanted a job. He also said the company would buy more products from the U.S. and help more employees become full time.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 28-year-old driver never even flinched the other day when his passenger, trying to make a little joke, asked whether he could find the latest Red Hot Chili Peppers rock 'n' roll album in this ancient city-turned-Arab bastion of Soviet-style socialism. " 'Blood Sugar Sex Magik'?" he replied, lowering his Porsche sunglasses and raising the eyebrows of a rock connoisseur. His passenger nodded, stunned. "No problem."
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