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Oil Yugoslavia

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NEWS
December 14, 1999 | Reuters
The European Union plans new heating oil deliveries this week to two towns controlled by opponents of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, hoping for less severe border delays than the first shipment encountered. Trucks carrying fuel to ease winter hardship in the southern Serbian towns of Nis and Pirot were held up by Yugoslav customs officials for almost two weeks and arrived only last Tuesday.
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NEWS
December 14, 1999 | Reuters
The European Union plans new heating oil deliveries this week to two towns controlled by opponents of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, hoping for less severe border delays than the first shipment encountered. Trucks carrying fuel to ease winter hardship in the southern Serbian towns of Nis and Pirot were held up by Yugoslav customs officials for almost two weeks and arrived only last Tuesday.
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NEWS
April 19, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As NATO announced evidence Sunday of 43 new mass burial sites in the Serbian province of Kosovo, the United States and its allies moved toward ratcheting up their pressure on Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic by imposing an oil blockade. "We are talking with our NATO allies about taking stricter action in order to limit the amount of oil that goes in," said Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As NATO announced evidence Sunday of 43 new mass burial sites in the Serbian province of Kosovo, the United States and its allies moved toward ratcheting up their pressure on Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic by imposing an oil blockade. "We are talking with our NATO allies about taking stricter action in order to limit the amount of oil that goes in," said Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States on Saturday joined the European economic sanctions against Yugoslavia and will co-sponsor a U.N. resolution that could lead to an oil embargo, President Bush said. But he expressed skepticism that the measures would bring an end to the ethnic bloodshed there. The step was the strongest yet by the United States to bring pressure on the warring Serbs and Croats, whose battles have taken thousands of lives.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Half a century after the alliance was created as a bulwark against Soviet aggression, the leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization put down a new marker Saturday, agreeing that it can use military force to prevent the abuse of human rights anywhere in Europe.
NEWS
January 6, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed guards keep order as desperate students, housewives and pensioners stand in line all night to be told in the morning when to come back. At the appointed time, a day or two later, each "customer" returns for another all-day vigil, braving hours on the frosty streets of Belgrade to wait with thousands of others to enter Dafiment Bank.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization on Tuesday approved sending a heavily armed force of 45,000 to 50,000 troops to the borders of war-devastated Kosovo, but U.S. officials insisted that the peacekeepers will enter the province only with the consent of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. "The operations plan calls for this force to operate in a permissive environment. End of story," a Western diplomat said.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The banking system has broken down. Unemployment and inflation are soaring. The passing of summer mutes the pathos of missing tourists and shuttered hotels but not their impact. Ethnic violence is ravaging the economic heart of Yugoslavia, long the most dynamic nation in Eastern Europe. In cold economic terms, the accelerating national tragedy has one simple cause: Yugoslavs, consumed by regional xenophobia, would rather fight each other than grow together in one country.
NEWS
April 22, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. government gave the green light Wednesday to renewed NATO planning for ground troops in Kosovo as British Prime Minister Tony Blair, emerging as the alliance's most outspoken hawk, pressed President Clinton to accept his plan for an eventual invasion against a weakened Yugoslav army.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States on Saturday joined the European economic sanctions against Yugoslavia and will co-sponsor a U.N. resolution that could lead to an oil embargo, President Bush said. But he expressed skepticism that the measures would bring an end to the ethnic bloodshed there. The step was the strongest yet by the United States to bring pressure on the warring Serbs and Croats, whose battles have taken thousands of lives.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and PAUL RICHTER and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States and its NATO allies gave their full support Monday to a longshot Russian effort to find a way out of the Kosovo crisis--as long as it meets their demands that Yugoslavia pull its forces out of the province and allow refugees to return under an international peacekeeping force. Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott, the Clinton administration's top Russia-watcher, is scheduled to meet in Moscow today with Russia's trouble-shooter for the Balkans, Viktor S.
NEWS
April 26, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Leaders of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, wrapping up their 50th anniversary summit here, pledged Sunday to use all necessary force to defend the embattled countries on Yugoslavia's borders if the Kosovo war infects the rest of the Balkans.
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