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SCIENCE
May 25, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
As early as Wednesday, BP will begin its first attempt to seal the deep ocean well that is spewing oil into the Gulf of Mexico, using a series of high-risk maneuvers that has never been attempted at such depths. The so-called top kill effort is increasingly crucial for BP, which has come under attack in recent days from Obama administration officials and Gulf Coast states frustrated with the company's inability to cap the well and stop the worsening environmental disaster. BP officials were running diagnostics Tuesday on the blowout preventer above the leaking well, a final step before the effort gets underway.
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NATIONAL
May 16, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall and Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
Biologist Dennis Takahashi-Kelso peered into the cobalt waters of the Gulf of Mexico 20 miles off the Louisiana coast. The only sign of pollution was a plastic bag floating beneath the surface. More than three weeks after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, resulting in a leak spewing 210,000 gallons of crude per day into the gulf, the fouled beaches and dead seabirds that are the hallmarks of catastrophic spills have yet to materialize. But Takahashi-Kelso, who was Alaska's commissioner of Environmental Conservation at the time of the Exxon Valdez disaster, warned: "It's going to be bad."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Jason Wells
A suspected drug lab at a home in Malibu caught fire and exploded Tuesday, injuring one person who had to be transported to the hospital via helicopter, authorities said. Firefighters responded to the home  in the 1200 block of Encinal Canyon Road shortly before 6:15 p.m. to find it fully engulfed in flames, according to the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Authorities later discovered the substance “honey oil” -- a type of marijuana oil -- at the residence, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Sgt. Fray Lupian told KTLA-TV . A 25-year-old man who was burned in the explosion and ensuing fire was airlifted to Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center to be treated for his injuries, authorities said.
NATIONAL
June 3, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall and Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
BP engineers lowered a cap over the top of the company's blown-out well Thursday night, an important step in efforts to contain the thousands of barrels of oil spewing daily into the Gulf of Mexico. "The placement of the containment cap is another positive development in BP's most recent attempt to contain the leak; however, it will be some time before we can confirm that this method will work and to what extent it will mitigate the release of oil into the environment," Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the national incident commander for the spill, said in a written statement.
NATIONAL
July 11, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
In another subsea attempt to control its gushing well, BP began a risky procedure Saturday that could contain all of the oil spewing into the Gulf of Mexico within a week. But the around-the-clock procedure comes with a price: Millions of gallons of oil will flow into the gulf for at least two days until a new cap is mounted. Although it's the latest in a series of attempts to contain the gusher, it's not a final fix. By Saturday afternoon, robots had removed a containment cap from the leaking well, a move that caused oil to freely gush into the ocean.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | Bloomberg
Oil extended the longest rally in two years as tensions with Iran threatened supplies while signs of economic growth boosted the outlook for demand. The Standard & Poor's 500 Index closed at the highest level since June 2008. Crude for April delivery rose for a seventh day, increasing 1.8% to $109.77 a barrel, the highest settlement since May 3. The Standard & Poor's 500 Index increased 0.2% to 1,365.74 after earlier rallying as much as 0.4%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average slipped 1.74 points to 12,982.95, retreating from an almost four-year high.
OPINION
October 25, 2002
The cheapest and best way to defeat terrorism is to become independent of oil. Harry Levin Woodland Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Idled fishermen, oil-slathered pelicans, tar balls washing up on beaches: The daily deluge of sad images from the Gulf of Mexico aren't exactly a choice backdrop for a pro-oil political campaign, especially in an environmentally sensitive California beach town. But on June 8, just seven weeks after the deadly explosion on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, Carpinteria voters will decide on an oil company's bid to expand its operations in the Santa Barbara Channel. If it succeeds, an initiative by Denver-based Venoco Inc. will pave the way for an onshore drilling rig that would extend pipes into the ocean floor and suck out as many as 11,000 barrels of oil a day. Located at a facility Venoco has owned since 1999, the initial exploratory rig would be about 17 stories tall and stay in place for up to a year.
SCIENCE
May 1, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
A first analysis of oil from the Gulf of Mexico spill suggests that it might not be typical Louisiana sweet crude, as was originally thought, but a heavier form of petroleum that could have a much harsher environmental impact and make cleanup much more difficult, one Louisiana oil spill expert warned Friday. Most experts have assumed that the oil slick consists of Louisiana sweet crude because that is the predominant product in the region. The new analysis will make them take a closer look.
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