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February 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Biogen Inc. won U.S. approval to sell a treatment for psoriasis that lacks side effects of older drugs and could bring it $500 million in annual sales. Amevive, an injected medicine, won Food and Drug Administration clearance for patients with a form of the skin disease called moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis. The drug is expected to face competition from Amgen Inc.'s arthritis drug Enbrel, which is being studied as a psoriasis treatment.
July 27, 1986
In answer to reader Janis David's question, "Where's the cat" in Letters June 22, in reference to my article on house swapping June 8, Bubbles, our Siamese, more perceptive than her family, moved next door to our neighbors' shortly after she met the exchangers. Numerous people have inquired about this; I should have put it in my article. JUDITH SPECHT Malibu
June 27, 1986
Members of Congress may try to deny the harsh truth of the matter, but they have finally given President Reagan carte blanche to wage his dirty little war against Nicaragua. Reagan wanted the House of Representatives to approve $100 million in military aid for the contra rebels in Nicaragua so that they could continue their war against the Sandinista government there.
March 19, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
It is late Friday morning, and our hearts have started beating again. The dreaded words were right there in the morning paper: " Vin Scully hospitalized." It happened so close to deadline that the story could not satisfy the axioms of journalism and say what, why and how. Now we know. He fell at home and hit his head. But he is OK. The good news got out there quickly. It marks the first time we have been happy for the existence of the Internet. And then it hits us. Would any other member of the Dodgers — any other member of any sports franchise in Los Angeles — be deemed so important that a newspaper felt compelled, and correctly so, to print a man-enters-hospital story with no other details?
May 15, 2012 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission, teetering on the brink of financial ruin, approved a controversial deal Monday to surrender day-to-day control of the historic venue to USC. The 8-1 vote would virtually end public stewardship of the 88-year-old stadium, a jewel of its South Los Angeles neighborhood built to honor World War I veterans and financed with public money. USC has long sought control of the Coliseum, decrying the property's outdated condition as unfit for the school's Trojan football team, which plays there.
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