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Olaf Palme

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NEWS
February 2, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
The clump of roses on the busy Stockholm sidewalk seems a modest memorial to Sweden's best-known statesman and late prime minister, Olof Palme. But in the months since last Feb. 28, when an assassin's bullet killed Palme as he walked home from a movie theater with his wife, countless thousands of Swedes have come to stare at the flowers that mark the spot where their prime minister fell.
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NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
An appeals court on Friday agreed to a new trial for Christer Pettersson, who was convicted in the slaying of Prime Minister Olof Palme, the national TT news agency said. Pettersson, a 42, was sentenced to life in prison last month after his conviction. He denied shooting Palme and appealed. The prosecution also appealed because it wanted to convict Pettersson of attempted murder in the wounding of Palme's widow, Lisbeth.
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NEWS
July 3, 1988
A Swedish police inspector suspected of having smuggled illegal eavesdropping equipment for a secret inquiry into the murder of Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986 has been arrested, Swedish radio reported. It said Carl Ostling, 35, would be charged with having smuggled the equipment on behalf of Ebbe Carlsson, a publisher with close links to the ruling Social Democrats who led the abortive investigation.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | Associated Press
A 41-year-old Swede with a long criminal record pleaded innocent Friday to charges of killing Prime Minister Olof Palme in a case that has frustrated this orderly nation for nearly three years. Christer Pettersson was arraigned at Stockholm District Court, and a judge ordered him held for further questioning. Press reports hailed his arrest Wednesday as a breakthrough in the investigation. Palme, a four-term prime minister who championed leftist causes and disarmament, was killed Feb.
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | From Reuters
A Moscow street is to be named after slain Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme, the newspaper Moskovskaya Pravda said Friday. It said a passageway in the Lenin Hills area of the Soviet capital would be named in honor of Palme, who was shot dead in Stockholm in February, 1986. His killer remains unknown.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
An appeals court on Friday agreed to a new trial for Christer Pettersson, who was convicted in the slaying of Prime Minister Olof Palme, the national TT news agency said. Pettersson, a 42, was sentenced to life in prison last month after his conviction. He denied shooting Palme and appealed. The prosecution also appealed because it wanted to convict Pettersson of attempted murder in the wounding of Palme's widow, Lisbeth.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | Associated Press
A 41-year-old Swede with a long criminal record pleaded innocent Friday to charges of killing Prime Minister Olof Palme in a case that has frustrated this orderly nation for nearly three years. Christer Pettersson was arraigned at Stockholm District Court, and a judge ordered him held for further questioning. Press reports hailed his arrest Wednesday as a breakthrough in the investigation. Palme, a four-term prime minister who championed leftist causes and disarmament, was killed Feb.
NEWS
July 3, 1989 | From Times wire services
A witness today testified he saw the man charged with killing Prime Minister Olaf Palme at a train station around the time Palme was shot outside a movie theater. Algot Asell, 68, was the first witness in the trial to support the alibi of the defendant, Christer Pettersson. Pettersson denies killing Palme. The prosecution said it would call witnesses to cast doubt on Asell's credibility. Asell said he saw Pettersson waiting for a train at the Marsta station between 11 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. on Feb.
OPINION
March 9, 1986
With the death of Sweden's Prime Minister, Olof Palme, the cause of peace lost a needed friend and spokesman. What twisted mind, what soulless human being could have coldbloodedly assassinated him, and for what reason? On Dec. 14, 1985 I was privileged to be one of the thousands who locally attended the Beyond War Peace Award Ceremony when six heads of state were honored for their participation in the Five Continent Peace Initiative calling for an end to the nuclear threat. Olaf Palme was one of the honorees.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
At the end, fat tears sparkled in the eyes of Daniel Ortega when his wife hugged him from behind and kissed his cheek. But with a stoicism that marked a dignified and reflective speech resembling nothing more than a valedictory, the defeated president and revolutionary guerrilla commander held them back. His chin quivered for an instant at his closing exhortation today to continue "Forward!" If he had blinked, the tears would have trickled down his face.
NEWS
July 3, 1988
A Swedish police inspector suspected of having smuggled illegal eavesdropping equipment for a secret inquiry into the murder of Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986 has been arrested, Swedish radio reported. It said Carl Ostling, 35, would be charged with having smuggled the equipment on behalf of Ebbe Carlsson, a publisher with close links to the ruling Social Democrats who led the abortive investigation.
NEWS
June 27, 1987 | From Reuters
A Moscow street is to be named after slain Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme, the newspaper Moskovskaya Pravda said Friday. It said a passageway in the Lenin Hills area of the Soviet capital would be named in honor of Palme, who was shot dead in Stockholm in February, 1986. His killer remains unknown.
NEWS
February 2, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
The clump of roses on the busy Stockholm sidewalk seems a modest memorial to Sweden's best-known statesman and late prime minister, Olof Palme. But in the months since last Feb. 28, when an assassin's bullet killed Palme as he walked home from a movie theater with his wife, countless thousands of Swedes have come to stare at the flowers that mark the spot where their prime minister fell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1986
You asked the right question in your editorial (April 10), "Why Not Negotiate?," but, not surprisingly, you didn't come up with an answer. For, of course, with the mind-set of this Administration and many hawks on the Democratic side of the aisle there is no answer except a continuous and unremitting escalation of the arms race in a never-ending (and never-reaching) search for nuclear superiority over the Soviet Union. This mindless determination for "superiority" is the natural byproduct of 40 years of Cold War of which President Reagan is only the current presiding maestro.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1991 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Chutzpah has always been a major element of the avant-garde. The assertion that a product of self-indulgence is art merely because it's the artist's product--"It's art because I said it's art"--is a peculiar manifestation of it. See Warhol, Cage, the later Dali, etc. "Voliera" (The Aviary) by Sylvano Bussotti--composed 1986-89 according to completely inadequate program information--is a series of pieces, most with titles of various birds, "for a differentiated group of soloists."
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