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Ole Henriksen

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April 19, 1991 | MAUREEN SAJBEL
When international fashion models Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington and Linda Evangelista are in Los Angeles, they make a beeline for Ole Henriksen of Denmark, a small skin-care salon on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood. What they and other loyal followers, including Sylvester Stallone, Nastassja Kinski, Maud Adams and Diahann Carroll, have found there is a simple, natural method of skin care. Not the least of the appeal is Ole (pronounced ooh-la) Henriksen himself.
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NEWS
April 19, 1991 | MAUREEN SAJBEL
When international fashion models Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington and Linda Evangelista are in Los Angeles, they make a beeline for Ole Henriksen of Denmark, a small skin-care salon on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood. What they and other loyal followers, including Sylvester Stallone, Nastassja Kinski, Maud Adams and Diahann Carroll, have found there is a simple, natural method of skin care. Not the least of the appeal is Ole (pronounced ooh-la) Henriksen himself.
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TRAVEL
May 23, 2004
Hotel spas continue to open at a rapid rate. Among additions this month: * Kelly's Spa at the Mission Inn, a landmark hotel in Riverside that dates to 1903. The spa, named after Kelly Roberts, one of the owners, has six treatment rooms and two private villas (440 to 480 square feet). (800) 843-7755, www.missioninn.com. * The Well at Miramonte Resort & Spa in Indian Wells, covering 12,000 square feet, has 10 outdoor and nine indoor "relaxation suites." (800) 237-2926, www.thewellatmiramonte.com.
IMAGE
August 31, 2008 | Emili Vesilind, Times Staff Writer
Step away from the tweezers. The tapered, pin-thin eyebrows you've been meticulously sculpting every week since the '90s are looking about as dated as a Menudo T-shirt. Call it recession chic (visiting a brow specialist suddenly feels so indulgent), or further proof that we're moving toward a less coiffed -- even grungy -- era in fashion. But bushy brows are back for fall in a big way. Think Brooke Shields in her skin-tight Calvin Klein jeans, with those thick, healthy arches that veiled smoldering eyes.
NEWS
July 5, 1991 | BETH ANN KRIER
T-SHIRT COLLECTORS' ALERT: The last time it was possible to even think about buying something for $18 designed by artist Peter Shire was back in the mid-'70s. That's when then-undiscovered Shire was selling ceramic mugs, soap dishes and teapots from his funky Echo Park studio. Today, one of Shire's outrageous teapots will set you back some equally outrageous bucks: $2,000 to $6,000 at one of the trendier galleries throughout the world.
HEALTH
January 24, 2014 | By Alene Dawson
In this hyper-fast, crazy-overscheduled, stress-inducing, 24/7 plugged-in reality, baths seem indulgent, even quaint, conjuring images of 19th century paintings of women with their hair swirled high atop their heads in old-timey tubs pouring pails of heated water about them. But a bath may be just what the doctor ordered. "America is a fast-moving society. We have fewer holidays and vacation time than, for example, Europe, and because of technology we're always on the clock," says Ole Henriksen, owner of the eponymous skin care line and West Hollywood spa where he incorporates Japanese bathing rituals.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some people consider Sunset Plaza--a pocket of classy shops and intriguing outdoor cafes along Sunset Boulevard--one of the best kept secrets in the world. Madeleine Gallay, who opened an upscale boutique there two years ago (opposite an equally upscale boutique owned by her ex-husband, Charles Gallay), is convinced "many tourists know Rodeo Drive, they know Melrose Avenue, they even know La Brea Avenue. But they don't know Sunset Plaza. This is not a high-profile place."
IMAGE
November 23, 2008 | Monica Corcoran, Corcoran is a Times staff writer.
In a perfect world, nails wouldn't chip and our follicles would never betray us and spit out gray hairs. But in real life, we need maintenance. American women spent enough on that last year to help make U.S. hair salons a $6-billion business, and that's in addition to what we shelled out to spiff up the rest of us. A year ago, grooming costs didn't raise a perfectly arched brow. Now, we're tallying each treatment and taking matters into our own hands.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | GAILE ROBINSON
Menswear designer Alexander Julian is steamed. He toiled for six months on the wardrobe for Robert Altman's new film, "The Player." And, wouldn't you know it, someone else is getting all the glory. Twice now, the film's star, Tim Robbins, has been described in tony publications as portraying "an Armani-clad studio executive" a description that is almost redundant in this town.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | the fashion staff
MEDFLY MEDLEY:: Hat designer Elizabeth Marcel's "Medfly" hat, at $250, has become the chic set's anti-malathion fashion statement. Dotted with Mediterranean fruit flies (as well as grasshoppers and spiders) crafted of wire wrapped with antique chenille and silk, Marcel reports it is among the bestsellers at The Hat Gallery on Melrose Avenue. Also on the anti-malathion fashion front: a T-shirt with malathion-like droplets on the shoulders and the words, "What Malathion?"
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